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40% teenagers don't pass English or Maths Watch

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    I think the problem probably relates to the individual more than anything else. Heck, most of them don't even try. I've spoken to a fair few people that failed English/Mathematics initially and none of them are incapable just extremely lazy! At least from what I've witnessed.

    Can't really force them to pass. Best you can really do is nag them to death.
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    So once you turn 15 stop reading? I agree writing skills since a large portion of the exams are essays, which comes from tutoring, I seriously believe, and independent practice, and of course reading more yes at 15 so you advance your comprehension and write like you're not a child. People say to learn how to write "read read read."
    I'm obviously not saying you should stop reading once you turn 15. I'm saying that whatever you do at that point, a more significant factor in your performance will be your experience before that. Besides which, if you didn't much like reading at 13, you are unlikely to become a bookworm at 15.

    Writing skills are not something that can be revised particularly effectively. They're something that you develop gradually over a long period.
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    (Original post by loveleest)
    I always find it hilarious when people can't pass English GCSE.
    It's SO easy to pass it, how can you not pass a language you speak in everyday?
    I don't agree with that. Many kids fail because their school is failing. Teachers are a big factor and motivation to even learn is another. The way we speak English is different to English we learn at school in terms of structure and the way we convey it.
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    (Original post by Rhythmical)
    I don't agree with that. Many kids fail because their school is failing. Teachers are a big factor and motivation to even learn is another. The way we speak English is different to English we learn at school in terms of structure and the way we convey it.
    Yeah, I agree. School is a huge factor. In my school we only got 48% pass rate whilst I know other school's that got 70-80%
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    (Original post by loveleest)
    Yeah, I agree. School is a huge factor. In my school we only got 48% pass rate whilst I know other school's that got 70-80%

    Yeah my school's percentage is less than that. If they can't pass the normal GCSE English then they can either do the iGCSE or Functional Skills. English is always a difficult one to revise for, it's mainly about skills and if you aren't passionate about it or don't make the effort then you will struggle.
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    (Original post by Imperion)
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    I would love to see politicians like that tbh
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    I'll tell you what I think is an outrage, the amount of Chinese students who need dictionaries in their exams. If that's the case then the native English students should be allowed one as well, why do they get special treatment they could have notes and stuff in it. Also the eu students failing to pay back loans this is an outrage why don't their own countries fund their studies
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    Well for english, I was in bottom set. And the class used to mess around everyday however I managed to get an A for English Literature and a B for english language. This was better than the majority of the year and better than top set. I don't understand how teachers put you in groups just for behaviour and not work. Yes my behaviour sucked, but I was intelligent enough to get good grades even though my attitude sucked. However being in a set with other people with bad attitudes, it felt like i was the clever one and they were just idiots.

    Maybe it is a teaching problem as well? Indeed it is harder to revise for english, but it is possible to revise for it, e.g sentence structures. Revising for poems and their meaning (english literature). If classes were smaller, less interruptions?
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    (Original post by loveleest)
    English GCSE is easy as hell and if you fail it then you didn't put any effort into it.
    I didn't revise what so ever and I managed to get an A/B, so what is your excuse then?
    If it was so easy why didn't you get an A*
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    (Original post by paul514)
    Must do better need ABB to get anywhere decent


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    lol paul why you scaring people who told you abb is the grail otherwise youre in trouble?
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    If it was so easy why didn't you get an A*
    I did get an A* In one of my exams, my coursework bang me down.
    I did realise what I said sounded a bit ignorant though.
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    (Original post by loveleest)
    I disagree. I got an A/B in English GCSE, but my brother didn't even get a C, so what have you got to say about that?
    The same


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    Because of the way grade boundaries work, no matter how high someone scores, if everyone else scores higher, they won't get a good grade. So there are always going to be people failing English and Maths.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I'm obviously not saying you should stop reading once you turn 15. I'm saying that whatever you do at that point, a more significant factor in your performance will be your experience before that. Besides which, if you didn't much like reading at 13, you are unlikely to become a bookworm at 15.

    Writing skills are not something that can be revised particularly effectively. They're something that you develop gradually over a long period.
    Yea all right I'm not saying don't read as a child? I'm clearly emphasising that you read, I never specified which ages, just...read. What I'm saying though is that I agree practice makes perfect which is why I said for them to practice and provided my suggestions on how to: that being (this goes for any pupil at any age)...reading more, writing more, studying more, I said that.
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    Well people are stupid.

    The better question is whether that is a bad thing? Do they really need to pass GCSE maths and English to succeed in life?

    Personally, I don't think they do.
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    Well people are stupid.

    The better question is whether that is a bad thing? Do they really need to pass GCSE maths and English to succeed in life?

    Personally, I don't think they do.
    But passing them unlocks more opportunities in life? no?
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    But passing them unlocks more opportunities in life? no?
    I highly doubt that someone barely on the passing side has that many more options than someone who barely failed.

    But yes, I do agree that in general you are correct. The better you perform at school, your options are at least not worse.

    I did say though that they can still succeed. They might have fewer options, but it's not impossible.
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    I highly doubt that someone barely on the passing side has that many more options than someone who barely failed.

    But yes, I do agree that in general you are correct. The better you perform at school, your options are at least not worse.

    I did say though that they can still succeed. They might have fewer options, but it's not impossible.
    Success isn't also down to grades. Everyone has their own success stories, e.g someone having a baby. In their own mind, they're successful. So I agree with you too, grades don't contribute to success at a massive standard.
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    The system is terrible they need to encourage and enthuse not force and threaten. "You got to learn this or you will fail the exam" just causes resent and a loss of faith in their own ability.
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    Is this really a problem? Some people aren't suited to being academic in the slightest and have skills that are practical.

    I think what should happen is a change in culture towards hard work, not making the exams easier.
 
 
 
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