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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    The HEFCE, the organisation which tracks all of the 'university leaver' data for the country.

    Link to original article: http://blog.hefce.ac.uk/2015/07/08/u...-the-data-say/
    Which unis are these (arrowed)?!

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    (Original post by jneill)
    Which unis are these (arrowed)?!

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    No idea, I think he had to anonymously present the data. Might be able to suss it out if you looked for high grad prospects + low average UCAS points in the 2015 Computer Science rankings.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    No idea, I think he had to anonymously present the data. Might be able to suss it out if you looked for high grad prospects + low average UCAS points in the 2015 Computer Science rankings.

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    Please hold the line caller....

    ...sorry to keep you.


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    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    I said the average salary overall is 'about' 40k (Which is far higher than the 27k average salary), I went on to say that from some unis you could be earning that much upon graduation. Imperial's figure of 38k is definitely in that ball park.

    Secondly, my initial post was concerning the following statement.

    Which is completely incorrect, I wouldn't want OP to get the wrong idea and do a degree in games programming or some other trash. My following posts were regarding the questions put to me by other users.
    CS grads are not appreciated by employers
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Not at universities with good courses - i.e. where students have a) high average UCAS points achieved on entry [1] or b) universities with courses that employers love to hire from.

    Everyone recycles this same line over and over again, when it's in essence just BS. The statistics take into account poorly designed 'IT' courses, universities with subpar students, and for the most part a severe lack of initiative on students to pick up programming skills in their spare time. Absolutely EVERYONE I know who took the time to solidify their CS theoretical knowledge (i.e. they did well at uni) and cultivate a background in programming has ended up doing very well for themselves.

    Case in point, one of my mates at uni has recently landed a grad software engineer job at Facebook London, his package is ~£65k base salary + 0 - £10k bonus + ~£32k/year in stock grant. This guy spent his time going to hackathons, working on side projects as well as honing in his knowledge of traditional CS concepts like data structures and algorithms in order to pass his interviews.

    Most 'normal' grad employers still pay very well (think £25k+) for software engineers coming in with the right attitude, skillset and ability. The industry, and job sector is one of the fastest growing out of any others out there.

    So no, the degree is a perfectly respectable one with solid prospects for those whom put in the effort to develop their skills outside of uni. The problem is too many people don't, ultimately getting turned down from positions that need to get filled.

    [1] Evidence:


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    This is the point I'm trying to make to the OP, who doesn't seem to understand the importance of Maths in Computer Science. Obviously if you're going to a top CompSci university you're probably going to have employers practically begging to have you... but probably not if you're going to a course that accepts people with a grade C in A Level Maths or without A Level Maths in the first place.
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    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    CS grads are not appreciated by employers
    source?
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    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    source?
    Google is my source.
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    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    Google is my source.
    I think Google probably employ a few CS grads.
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    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    Google is my source.
    You clearly have experienced little academic rigor. Besides, google is made of CS graduates, people who work there enjoy mountains of benefits.
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    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    Google is my source.
    Toolish response to be honest.

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    (Original post by Minionmum)
    Hi
    My son is doing computer science at Northumbria in Newcastle - he only has a C in maths - also at Derby and Coventry you only needed a C last year - I think Bournemouth or Brighton (definitely one of those two ) only needed a C last year as well- did you do the maths module in your BTEC ? some unis will accept that in lieu of a B in maths - my son wanted to do this but the college wouldn't teach that,preferring to go with the animation module because more students wanted to do that one.Don't listen to anyone who starts to bang on about "ex-poly unis" not being any good for computer science - that's rubbish.
    I live at Derby anyways and thanks for the advice
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    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    Google is my source.
    Have you checked the job requirements for a software engineer at Google?
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    (Original post by alldayniqqa)
    Have you checked the job requirements for a software engineer at Google?
    LMAO, what planet are you on, dem jobs are rare.
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    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    LMAO, what planet are you on, dem jobs are rare.
    You idiot it was a reference to your post.
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    (Original post by alldayniqqa)
    You idiot it was a reference to your post.
    They want CS, not all companies want CS. They've had bad experiences with grads not knowing any practical skills.
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    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    They want CS, not all companies want CS. They've had bad experiences with grads not knowing any practical skills.
    Thats because some grads are lazy and expect the course to teach them everything they know. One reason why people say CS has one of the highest unemployment rates out of all STEM degrees.
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    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    I just firmed imperial. Their average graduate salary is 38k for computer science. You underestimate the high demand for skilled graduates in this field.
    Population of 25 students with salary data.

    Of the 40 graduates who provided any data 4 are unemployed and only ~25 are employed the rest are in further study.
    https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search
    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    Even if you did the BEng and made 33k upon graduation, that's higher than the UK average salary, which is pretty good in my opinion. Especially considering its just a starting salary and that after just a few years you would be earning a lot more.
    Population of 15 students providing salary data reached by averaging salary data over the last 2 years.

    Of the full population of graduates 1/4 of the 15 grads was unemployed.
    https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search

    For a course were 100% of entrants have over 440 tariff points and have a good base in London to get high paying London waged employment that's shockingly bad - the high rates of further study don't imply a vocational course valued by employers, they imply a course that is academically rigorous but missing key employable characteristics.

    (Original post by jneill)
    Please hold the line caller....

    ...sorry to keep you.


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    (Original post by PQ)
    Population of 25 students with salary data.

    Of the 40 graduates who provided any data 4 are unemployed and only ~25 are employed the rest are in further study.
    https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search

    Population of 15 students providing salary data reached by averaging salary data over the last 2 years.

    Of the full population of graduates 1/4 of the 15 grads was unemployed.
    https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search

    For a course were 100% of entrants have over 440 tariff points and have a good base in London to get high paying London waged employment that's shockingly bad - the high rates of further study don't imply a vocational course valued by employers, they imply a course that is academically rigorous but missing key employable characteristics.


    It's ALWAYS Aston
    You're using statistics you don't deem valid to justify a stance. Come again?
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    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    You're using statistics you don't deem valid to justify a stance. Come again?
    She's not saying 'it's invalid', she's saying a sample size of ~11 and ~25 out of a graduating class that's at least 10-20x of the latter is hardly representative.

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    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    You're using statistics you don't deem valid to justify a stance. Come again?
    No - I'm emphasising the the population with salary data is a subset of the overall graduating class. Unemployed or further study graduates aren't even ASKED for their salary/income information.

    If only 2/3 of a degree graduates are employed then it doesn't matter how much those graduates are paid - it doesn't indicate that the course is desirable to employers.
 
 
 
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