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    (Original post by vincrows)
    Don't even think of playing with the statistic game, as it won't work.

    But being a mature applicant means there's a good chance you'll be pooled to one of the mature colleges. But as I said, as long as you're good enough, you'll be in Cambridge.
    Your academic capability and potential is the only thing that matters. Nothing else.
    Well there may be a little merit in statistics in Thomb's case as there have been no architects accepted at any of the mature colleges (except LucyCav, not an option for him, despite his hair... ) in the last 5 years.

    Edit to add: Thomb I do think it would be worth you asking the 21+ Admission Tutor about this and see what her advice is. There may be something specific to Architecture... (I know you are already on her thread).
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Well there may be a little merit in statistics in Thomb's case as there have been no architects accepted at any of the mature colleges (except LucyCav, not an option for him, despite his hair... ) in the last 5 years.

    Edit to add: Thomb I do think it would be worth you asking the 21+ Admission Tutor about this and see what her advice is. There may be something specific to Architecture... (I know you are already on her thread).
    Think it's more to do with there're so few places for Architecture and just a few mature colleges rather than mature colleges not accepting architecture applicants.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    Think it's more to do with there're so few places for Architecture and just a few mature colleges rather than mature colleges not accepting architecture applicants.
    Yes for sure. But would be good to get the AT's view. e.g. Philosophy, a similarly sized course, seems to have more "success" at mature colleges.
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    Well I'm going to aim for Cambridge and I like the course because it is academic. Do you think applying to an oversubscribed college like Kings would detract from my application in any way?
    Architecture is very competitive at all Colleges. Don't forget about the Winter Pool! Last year we rejected all our direct applicants to Architecture and took from the Pool instead so just because you apply to a very popular college doesn't mean you stand less of a chance! Application statistics and specialism of Fellows are some of the only 'wrong' ways to approach college choice - the University website has more info.

    I'd normally say that an open application is fine too but Architecture is one of the courses where Colleges have slightly different requirements in terms of subjects preferences so given your circumstances I'd make sure to contact the Admissions Offices of Colleges you're interested in to explain your situation. I've given you advice in our thread about Peterhouse in our thread, but this is only for Peterhouse, not the University in general..


    (Original post by Thomb)
    Also I'm a mature student would I be better off at a mature students college?
    This is a very personal question that only you can answer. Certainly don't rule them out and try and visit on an open day if you can.
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    I saw someone mentioned that a mature student would most likely be pooled for mature colleges. Is this true?

    I have a place for postgraduate study (MPhil Epidemiology), I listed Clare and Trinity as my preferred colleges, unfortunately I was unsuccessful at both (I think they must be pretty full at this time of the year). I'm guaranteed to be offered a college, but now my application will be pooled and sent to 3 other colleges. Will they take into consideration what I listed as my preferences when pooling me? For example colleges that are similar to clare or trinity in terms of location or size?
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    (Original post by FCB)
    I saw someone mentioned that a mature student would most likely be pooled for mature colleges. Is this true?

    I have a place for postgraduate study (MPhil Epidemiology), I listed Clare and Trinity as my preferred colleges, unfortunately I was unsuccessful at both (I think they must be pretty full at this time of the year). I'm guaranteed to be offered a college, but now my application will be pooled and sent to 3 other colleges. Will the consider what I listed as my preferences when pooling me? For example colleges that are similar to clare or trinity in terms of location or size?
    This thread is really a discussion for undergrad applicants. PG is rather different.

    You might do better asking here
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3533661
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    (Original post by FCB)
    I saw someone mentioned that a mature student would most likely be pooled for mature colleges. Is this true?

    I have a place for postgraduate study (MPhil Epidemiology), I listed Clare and Trinity as my preferred colleges, unfortunately I was unsuccessful at both (I think they must be pretty full at this time of the year). I'm guaranteed to be offered a college, but now my application will be pooled and sent to 3 other colleges. Will they take into consideration what I listed as my preferences when pooling me? For example colleges that are similar to clare or trinity in terms of location or size?
    The way they select/deselect postgraduate applicants and allocate them to a college is very different from undergraduate.
    Only the postgraduate admission office of the department you applied to can answer that sort of question.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    The way they select/deselect postgraduate applicants and allocate them to a college is very different from undergraduate.
    Only the postgraduate admission office of the department you applied to can answer that sort of question.
    Well as far as I can tell, the department that actually runs the MPhil programme has no input on the college allocation process, they just recommend my application to the board of graduate studies for an offer of a place. I would imagine it's the BoGS that are involved in sending my application to the individual colleges.

    Thanks for the feedback, I just thought the way open/pooled applications were allocated would be similar between undergrad and postgrad.
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    (Original post by FCB)
    Well as far as I can tell, the department that actually runs the MPhil programme has no input on the college allocation process, they just recommend my application to the board of graduate studies for an offer of a place. I would imagine it's the BoGS that are involved in sending my application to the individual colleges.

    Thanks for the feedback, I just thought the way open/pooled applications were allocated would be similar between undergrad and postgrad.
    Yes, the department recommend to each college and its up to an individual college to accept or not.
    It's really very different procedure from undergraduate application and it's much less transparent how they select/deselect, too.
    So, nobody in an Internet forum like this can give you much reliable advice, except for those general things, I'm afraid.
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    (Original post by Peterhouse Admissions)
    Your choice needs to be about the course. Forget about rankings. Do you like the look of the Natural Sciences course? How do you feel about having to study other experimental sciences in the first year (not just physics)? Do you think you'd get on with the supervision style of teaching?

    Many students decide that they do in fact prefer the course content elsewhere, or don't think the supervision system would work for them. As long as this is a genuine and informed choice this is fine. Nobody is helped by elevating Oxbridge as the be-all and end-all of universities. Also, many very bright candidates aren't successful in getting an offer because we think they wouldn't suit the course as delivered here, or the supervision style of teaching.

    Remember that the college you pick is only a preference and you might end up somewhere else, so don't agonise over the choice too much - it's not that important (heresy!) provided you have researched the admissions requirements for the college you apply to. Remember also that your college doesn't have a big effect on the teaching you receive - you'll be supervised by experts wherever you go, lots of the teaching is centralised or at least shared across many colleges and by the time you specialise in your third and fourth year, you'll be found the appropriate supervisor regardless of College. Forget about rankings, really. Most colleges have old and new bits - being founded in 1284 doesn't mean that all of our accommodation is centuries old - some of it is less than 2 years old!

    Having said it doesn't matter....
    https://www.pet.cam.ac.uk/natural-sciences

    The best way to find out about colleges is to come on an open day.
    Great advice. Perhaps the OP should give consideration to applying to Porterhouse.
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    My sixth form took us to visit a college a few months ago and I am very keen to apply.
    However, the college has no DOS or fellows for my chosen subject. Would that make difference and how?
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    (Original post by crablet)
    My sixth form took us to visit a college a few months ago and I am very keen to apply.
    However, the college has no DOS or fellows for my chosen subject. Would that make difference and how?
    What subject and college is it?
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    What subject and college is it?
    Geography at Caius.
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    (Original post by crablet)
    Geography at Caius.
    Seems fine:

    Geography at Caius

    Caius admits three or four students in Geography each year. Dr David Nally is the Director of Studies for geographers at Caius. He is a Human Geographer, and he arranges the supervisions with expert staff for students. In the first year, students can expect about three supervisions each fortnight. Many of these supervisions will be with the Director of Studies although others may be with people who are specialists in the various subject areas covered in the first–year courses. In the second and third year, supervisions may be about one per week and students will probably see a wider range of people than in the first year. Lectures are provided in the Department and are the same for all students, regardless of College. As a Geographer at Caius, you will find yourself studying and socialising in a very dynamic, friendly and inter–disciplinary environment.
    from here.

    Seems like they've got two (external) DoS's for geography at Caius so you won't be impeded in anyway nor will there be any difference.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Seems fine:



    from here.

    Seems like they've got two (external) DoS's for geography at Caius so you won't be impeded in anyway nor will there be any difference.
    Many thanks for your help.
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    (Original post by crablet)
    Many thanks for your help.
    No problem. Good luck with your application.
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    (Original post by crablet)
    My sixth form took us to visit a college a few months ago and I am very keen to apply.
    However, the college has no DOS or fellows for my chosen subject. Would that make difference and how?
    Have you read this?

    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...sing-a-college
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    Many thanks for the link.
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    (Original post by _Avi)
    Okay - so I want to apply to Cambridge but not sure what college to apply for. Not so keen about an open application so trying to find out what would be the best college for me. I've heard Trinity is the "best" so that would be my first option. But I would like to know if there's a college better suited to me.

    I want to study Physics, maybe until PhD level. I have a great interest in sport - my favourite sport being cricket and I would like to play cricket during my time at uni. I like going to the gym so the college would have to have good gym facilities. Apart from this, stuff like good internet and kitchen facilities is all I need. If someone can please help me and advise me on what to do, I would be very grateful.

    Thanks 👍
    Hey, What I am about to say only applies to if you want to do theoretical physics really

    If your end goal is to purse a phd in theoretical physics then the best place to go in the UK is the the maths course at cam, it allows entry to their part III which is in practice the only way to do a phd in theoretical physics there (and it is arguably the best place in the world to do a theoretical physics phd)

    Also part III is some of the best prep for a theoretical physics phd (assuming you chose the theory modules in the later years)
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Hey, What I am about to say only applies to if you want to do theoretical physics really

    If your end goal is to purse a phd in theoretical physics then the best place to go in the UK is the the maths course at cam, it allows entry to their part III which is in practice the only way to do a phd in theoretical physics there (and it is arguably the best place in the world to do a theoretical physics phd)

    Also part III is some of the best prep for a theoretical physics phd (assuming you chose the theory modules in the later years)
    So to obtain a PhD in Theoretical Physics, I would have to do Maths (which I don't mind, but would prefer to do Physics)? There is no option through the Natural Scienes course? Also, what is this "Part III" that you mention? Part III of the Natural Sciences course?
 
 
 
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