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    How's this plan? Do people agree with these points? Thank you 2014 Question 1: Towhat extent was instability in England, in the years 1547-1558, brought aboutby religious changes? It was brought about by religious changes;1. 1549: Guy – ‘the closest thing England came to aclass war’. This year was a crisis point (link to other factors such as threatof French invasion, some soldiers garrisoning Scotland) due to Westernrebellion. ‘Prayer Book’ rebellion arguably religious in origin, due tointroduction of new Prayer Book and William Body the commissioner beingmurdered for investigating church property 1547. Brought about also by continuingreligious changes which those in Cornwall/Devon had been forced to endure foryears. However, note that other motives drove the rebels also, such associo-economic grievances (i.e. sheep tax).2. Wyatt’s rebellion 1554 – arguably religious in origin.If they’d breached the city’s defences, her reign may have been over. It showedthat Protestants couldn’t be annoyed. Moreover, showed popular suspicion ofmarriage to a Catholic, Phillip II of Spain, and all that would entail. Wyatt’srebellion truly threatened Mary, and some of her own soldiers mutinied.3. There was substantial opposition to the restorationof Catholicism under Mary. For example, as religion was enshrined in statutelaw, Mary depended on members of the political elite to get her religiousreforms through parliament. However, many of these people had benefitted financiallyfrom the acquisition of monastic lands (brought about by the Protestant reformation)and they didn’t want to surrender their ‘ill-gotten gains’. About 80 MPs voted againstthe repeal of Edwardian religious laws. Moreover, her religious changes createdproblems for the Church, with more than ¼ of clergy in London/Norwich beingdeprived of their posts for being married. It suffered severe manpower problemsas a result. Nevertheless, there were a number of other factors toconsider:1. Socio-economic tension played a big part in the instabilitywitnessed during Somerset’s protectorship. His desire to reassert the ancient claimof Edward I to suzerainty over the Scottish throne and to unite crowns ofScotland/England caused much instability in the realm. Firstly, he was forcedto debase the coinage to raise £537,000 which was needed to fund expensivegarrisons in Scottish borders. This increased inflationary pressures (madeworse by context of Henry VIII’s legacy). His aggressive approach to Scotlandincreased chances of a French invasion (link to heightened threat of 1549rebellions as soldiers were pre-occupied due to fear of French invasion). Allthis served to cause further resentment amongst Privy Council at Somerset’sautocratic style of government. 2. The succession crisis of 1553 – EVI was takenill in Feb 1553 and his health declined rapidly. HVIII had set out in his willthat if Edward were to die without issue, then Mary was to succeed him.Northumberland wanted to prevent this as he knew Mary would restore the countryto Catholicism. Thus, the ‘Devise’ began to take shape. Dale Hoak: originalidea for it should be attributed to Edward and not Northumberland. EVI namedLady Jane Grey as his successor. Jane married Northumberland’s son GuildfordDudley in 1553 and E/M were once again declared illegitimate. But, Devise wasn’tlegally watertight, and E died before parliament could be summoned to setSuccession Act of 1544 aside. Mary gathered support quickly, despite Jane beingproclaimed queen. Northumberland’s naval force mutinied and joined Mary.3. Mary never produced an heir. Not only did thisundermine her authority, but it also made Catholic succession look unlikely. Hermarriage to Phillip II of Spain was a failure for a number of reasons,including not producing an heir, and also dragging Mary into the Franco-Spanishwar which resulted in the loss of symbolically crucial Calais. Some argue thatMary got involved with war partly as it meant that Phillip would have to cometo England and spend time with her if England were to aid in the Spanishvictory. She was desperate for an heir, but Philip hated England (rain, lack ofwelcome at court, aged wife) so he resolved to spend as little time there aspossible.0 b˕�^��
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    Would anyone have a look at this? Too narrative or a good balance between arguments and evidence? Clear enough or confusing to read? It's in the context of whether government was disillusioned, but it's a one-sided argument right now.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    It cannot be denied that later government experienced huge shortcomings. The Privy Council began to lose its most skilled members, such as Leicester who died in 1588 or The Chancellor of the Exchequer Walter Mildmay in 1589, which exacerbated issues that Elizabeth now faced financially as the war with Spain was costly to sustain, and those issues contained to Parliament were intensified due to a lack of skilled Parliamentary managers, or 'mediocrities (AGR Smith). It is therefore of little surprise that discontent over monopolies pervaded the 1597-8 Parliament and came to dominate that in 1601. The atmosphere of cooperation and loyalty to the Queen that had lingered in the 1589 Parliament – which granted her a double subsidy – was practically nonexistent by this time as MPs gained control of proceedings and refused to grant a subsidy until the crown's most unpopular monopolies were revoked, leading Guyto justifiably assert that this Parliament was the 'most fractious'of Elizabeth's reign. Though she herself saved it from collapse in her 'Golden Speech', the very fact that she had to personally intervene indicates that the Parliamentary disillusionment had reached its climax and aforementioned financial problems were in crisis as MPs could threaten to delay financial aid. Even in 1593 there were signs of turmoil as the Queen had to imprison Wentworth for breaching the royal prerogative, whereas Parliament had done so in 1576 - a stark contrast in its loyalty to the crown between the two periods and 'a crude reminder of the realities of royal power' by the 1590s (AGR Smith). Without a doubt the Privy Council's position was fragile, particularly considering the factional antagonism between Cecil and Essex that limited its efficiency, and Parliament was at the peak of disillusionment by the end stage of 1601 which had augmented throughout the 1590s.
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    (Original post by QueenOfNachos)
    Do you think the religion theme will only be limited to the Mid-Tudor period or span across the period of Edward, Mary and Elizabeth?
    They would never have a question which spanned across all of their reigns (eg 1547-1603). Spec separates dates into 1547-1558, 1559-1571, 1572-1588, 1589-1603, and questions stay largely within these date ranges. They may overlap a little, and if they ask a Mid-Tudor question, whilst it's likely they will stick between 47-58, they could also extend it to the implementation of Elizabeth's settlement and ask who most effectively implemented their religious policy?
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    This thread is really helpful, thank you everyone
    What questions do you guys think are most likely to come up?
    I was thinking perhaps mid tudor : either gov. or religion (latter more likely)
    and then Liz- breadth either French FP or Parliament, depth either Mary QOS (this could either be the FP related q, religious q, or government themed q of the paper? - AQA roughly have one Q of each theme per paper ish) or a factional rivalry depth Q - although that would be v mean

    anyone else think what im saying has any sense to it?
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    This thread is very helpful, felt like there were hardly any people taking this history paper!

    I think there is a possibility that the causes of the war with Spain may come up, as last year it was simply the effects of the war as an "expensive failure". Last year the challenges to Elizabeth's religious settlement also came up, but a Puritan/Catholic threat question may be on the paper as there hasn't been a direct question asking how these two religious groups challenged Elizabeth's authority as 'Supreme Governor'. Does anyone have any ideas about the type of question that could be asked about French foreign policy? Really worried about this exam, they could put anything on the paper!
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    (Original post by elen90)
    Would anyone have a look at this? Too narrative or a good balance between arguments and evidence? Clear enough or confusing to read? It's in the context of whether government was disillusioned, but it's a one-sided argument right now.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    It cannot be denied that later government experienced huge shortcomings. The Privy Council began to lose its most skilled members, such as Leicester who died in 1588 or The Chancellor of the Exchequer Walter Mildmay in 1589, which exacerbated issues that Elizabeth now faced financially as the war with Spain was costly to sustain, and those issues contained to Parliament were intensified due to a lack of skilled Parliamentary managers, or 'mediocrities (AGR Smith). It is therefore of little surprise that discontent over monopolies pervaded the 1597-8 Parliament and came to dominate that in 1601. The atmosphere of cooperation and loyalty to the Queen that had lingered in the 1589 Parliament – which granted her a double subsidy – was practically nonexistent by this time as MPs gained control of proceedings and refused to grant a subsidy until the crown's most unpopular monopolies were revoked, leading Guyto justifiably assert that this Parliament was the 'most fractious'of Elizabeth's reign. Though she herself saved it from collapse in her 'Golden Speech', the very fact that she had to personally intervene indicates that the Parliamentary disillusionment had reached its climax and aforementioned financial problems were in crisis as MPs could threaten to delay financial aid. Even in 1593 there were signs of turmoil as the Queen had to imprison Wentworth for breaching the royal prerogative, whereas Parliament had done so in 1576 - a stark contrast in its loyalty to the crown between the two periods and 'a crude reminder of the realities of royal power' by the 1590s (AGR Smith). Without a doubt the Privy Council's position was fragile, particularly considering the factional antagonism between Cecil and Essex that limited its efficiency, and Parliament was at the peak of disillusionment by the end stage of 1601 which had augmented throughout the 1590s.
    I think these phrases are signs of great anaylsis "the very fact that... indicates" "even in... there were signs of... whereas" and judgement "it cannot be denied that" "without a doubt"

    I would say just keep it very tightly focused on what you view "shortcomings" or "dillusionment" to be, eg. if you think divisions in policy is a part of the government's shortcomings then make it a bit more explicit. "discontent over monopolies were a clear indication of the Privy Council's increasing divisions, and thus shortcomings, as the conflict weakened the unity and productivity of decisions such as ..." or "due to the declining number of skilled councillors, Elizabeth's government was weakened by 'mediocrities' who were disillusioned with Elizabeth's more traditional aims and ambitions." - maybe i'm a bit repetitive but that sort of thing
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    (Original post by cookieCC)
    This thread is very helpful, felt like there were hardly any people taking this history paper!

    I think there is a possibility that the causes of the war with Spain may come up, as last year it was simply the effects of the war as an "expensive failure". Last year the challenges to Elizabeth's religious settlement also came up, but a Puritan/Catholic threat question may be on the paper as there hasn't been a direct question asking how these two religious groups challenged Elizabeth's authority as 'Supreme Governor'. Does anyone have any ideas about the type of question that could be asked about French foreign policy? Really worried about this exam, they could put anything on the paper!
    the only thing is, causes of the Spanish war have come up as questions frequently before so I thought it might be a bit exhausted as a question? or maybe as evidence they like it and could use it again agh so much
    but puritan/catholic would be lovely
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    (Original post by a_bit_of_a_noob)
    the only thing is, causes of the Spanish war have come up as questions frequently before so I thought it might be a bit exhausted as a question? or maybe as evidence they like it and could use it again agh so much
    but puritan/catholic would be lovely
    That's true, however, the factors they have previously asked about in regards to the deterioration of Anglo-Spanish relations is the Netherlands, disputes concerning overseas trade, and the actions of the English. There is a possibility they could ask about relations with France causing the war or even religion being the main factor? I'm not sure, but it definitely would be a nice question to have!
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    According to my history teacher, who is an examiner/marks the papers etc, they're so busy trying to sell next years paper to examiners that they wont have put too much effort into changing our exams and they are in too much trouble as it is to try and rock the boat. So expect more or less the same but with a twist. So how dangerous was MQS in regards to foreign policy or something.
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    (Original post by Kitta)
    According to my history teacher, who is an examiner/marks the papers etc, they're so busy trying to sell next years paper to examiners that they wont have put too much effort into changing our exams and they are in too much trouble as it is to try and rock the boat. So expect more or less the same but with a twist. So how dangerous was MQS in regards to foreign policy or something.
    Does that mean they know the questions for this paper? Or do they mark a different paper to the course they teach
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    (Original post by redwhiteandbrit)
    Hiya! Our teacher reckons they could be sneaky and throw in a question themed around Mary Q. Scots, or also one about domestic government under Elizabeth. Foreign policy might be the breadth question. I'm dreading this exam though - it's the day after geography so my head will be filled with case studies not dates!!
    Hi, I also have my geo exam the day before, are you doing Edexcel?
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    Is anyone else struggling to write essays within the timing? What kind of structure can I use to try and write in the time?☺️


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    Does anyone have an essay or essay plan centered on the Eliz's foreign policy in the last years??? Trying to revise it but a lot of it is narrative so I want to see what bits of information to include
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    (Original post by Student0724)
    Does anyone have an essay or essay plan centered on the Eliz's foreign policy in the last years??? Trying to revise it but a lot of it is narrative so I want to see what bits of information to include
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1465217178.370234.jpg
Views: 238
Size:  162.5 KB I've done this mind map with the last years at the bottom, hope this helps and sorry for any spelling mistakes 😂


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    I'm doing this exam and i'm really nervous for it. I have AS Edexcel Unit 2 Politics on Thursday afternoon and then this history on Friday morning. My teacher has predicted that ...
    Mid-Tudor religion
    Elizabeth's Government
    Elizabeth and religion (possibly Puritans?)
    Elizabeth's foreign policy (1558-85)
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    (Original post by cookieCC)
    Does anyone have any ideas about the type of question that could be asked about French foreign policy?
    (Original post by cookieCC)
    There is a possibility they could ask about relations with France causing the war or even religion being the main factor?
    Hey,

    Just cause you mentioned French FP, my teacher drafted this for me as an example of the type of question they'd ask about it:

    "How important were relations with France in helping Elizabeth achieve her foreign policy aims?"
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    (Original post by Student0724)
    Does anyone have an essay or essay plan centered on the Eliz's foreign policy in the last years??? Trying to revise it but a lot of it is narrative so I want to see what bits of information to include
    Hi,

    I have been making an extensive timeline of the whole of Elizabeth's reign. I'll pop down what I've got 1589-1603 FP wise:

    1589
    ◦Henry of Navarre crowned Henry IV of France. (Elizabeth reluctantly sends him 3,600 troops in support against the Catholic League.)
    ◦Counter Armada - Drake’s expedition to Portugal with three aims:
    ◾Destroy any remaining Armada ships
    ◾Support rebels in Lisbon against Philip II
    ◾Take the Azores

    1590
    ◦Elizabeth sends second force to Henry IV with success in Brittany.
    ◦Maurice of Nassau becomes established leader of the Dutch Protestants.

    1592
    ◦Drake’s expedition with an abortive attack on Lisbon and profitable plundering.◦Battle of Flores - Successful pillaging and capture of Madre de Dios, Spanish treasure ship.
    ◦Death of the Duke of Parma.
    1593
    ◦Henry of Navarre converts to Catholicism
    ◦The Levant Company founded to continue diplomatic relations with the Ottoman Empire. Patent for currants granted by Elizabeth.
    ◦Unprofitable plundering expeditions by Hawkins.

    1594
    ◦Spanish expelled from all Northern Provinces of the Netherlands.
    ◦Elizabeth sends 4,000 men to Brittany in an attempt to capture Brest.

    1595
    ◦Beginning of Tyrone’s Rebellion. Spanish support causes uneasiness.

    1596
    ◦Capture of Cadiz by Raleigh and Howard
    ◦United Provinces gain independence.

    1597
    ◦Azores expedition, which failed

    1598
    ◦Essex turns his back on the Queen after she ignores his advice on Ireland for Cecil’s, which she slaps him for.
    ◦Cumberland’s private enterprise venture in Puerto Rico.
    ◦Battle of Yellow Ford - English defeated. Tyrone asserts control over Ulster.

    1599
    ◦Essex appointed Lord Lieutenant to Ireland.
    ◾He disobeys her by making a truce with Tyrone rather than heading north into Ulster.
    ◾Suspended from the Privy Council.

    1600
    ◦The East India company founded to contest Spanish domination of the spice trade.

    1601
    ◦Essex Rebellion - he fails and is executed with poor support.
    ◦Battle of Kinsale. 3,000 Spanish troops. Mountjoy successful.
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    How would you guys deal with this question:

    "Both national and local government suffered from fundamental weaknesses in the years 1571-1588." ATVOTV.

    Factor wise, I've got local leaders (lord lieutenants and JPs), ministerial power/Elizabeth's control, factional rivalry and rebellions as loose headings. Anything I'm desperately missing?
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    (Original post by katinthehat)
    How would you guys deal with this question:

    "Both national and local government suffered from fundamental weaknesses in the years 1571-1588." ATVOTV.

    Factor wise, I've got local leaders (lord lieutenants and JPs), ministerial power/Elizabeth's control, factional rivalry and rebellions as loose headings. Anything I'm desperately missing?
    All I can think of is that in terms of government, this period saw the largest resistance in terms of religious opposition? Puritan attempts at reform in government from 1571 (Alphabet Bills) to 1587 (Anthony Cope's move to introduce Turners 'a Bill and a Book') and such religious divisions could lead to weakness? How likely would a governmental question come up that requires knowlegde of local gov.? Other than Council of the North's invovlement in Northern Rebellion (not even in this time frame), I'm struggling a bit to think.

    Could maybe split into 'internal opposition to religion', 'foreign policy' - Ireland, taxation subsidies and disputes over intervention, 'divisions over Elizabeth's security' - Mary QOS, Marriage and succession

    but really not sure, so please amend anything I've recommended
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    (Original post by Thebeast97)
    I'm doing this exam and i'm really nervous for it. I have AS Edexcel Unit 2 Politics on Thursday afternoon and then this history on Friday morning. My teacher has predicted that ...
    Mid-Tudor religion
    Elizabeth's Government
    Elizabeth and religion (possibly Puritans?)
    Elizabeth's foreign policy (1558-85)
    i agree, although if Mid-Tudor religion comes up I think that would likely rule out Religion in Elizabeth's reign?
    What do people think the likelihood of mid-tudor government coming up is
 
 
 
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