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How hard is it to get A* in English Literature GCSE? Watch

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    (Original post by MBK14)
    Using last years boundaries, 31 gives 41 UMS. This means you'll have to get 139 UMS between the two papers in the exam to get an A*. On last years unit 1 paper you needed 45/50 to get 70 UMS and on the unit 2 you needed 56/68 for another 70UMS, which would get you into the A*. So it is possible yeah! (WJEC btw)
    Thank you, I'm on AQA but it sounds quite similar. I really want an A* and it's upset me that my controlled assessment can't pull me up as I worked so hard on it
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    (Original post by Bulletzone)
    but mwe dwont know adult vocab .-.
    lol it okei google cn help u!!!!!!! google big adult words (:

    Nah just use "thus" instead of "hence/explains why", use JOKES adult words like "arouses the opinion of" bc ur examiner will think omg!!!!!!! a teenager that can use sexy time words in a mature manner!!!! ding ding ding motherphuker!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    (Original post by console.log)
    What exam board did you do English Literature with?
    Any advice, as I'm really putting in the time and revision but still only getting high As (28-32/35) because I'm struggling to work out what's needed.
    Edexcel. Already did a huge paragraph above about what I did to ace the exam!
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    Fairly easy. Last year when I did it, I'd never even read The Crucible fully and I got an A*.
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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    lol it okei google cn help u!!!!!!! google big adult words (:

    Nah just use "thus" instead of "hence/explains why", use JOKES adult words like "arouses the opinion of" bc ur examiner will think omg!!!!!!! a teenager that can use sexy time words in a mature manner!!!! ding ding ding motherphuker!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    (Original post by MBK14)
    How hard is it to get A* in English Literature GCSE?
    Well I didn't revise for my English Lit GCSE and I got 100% UMS do I'd say pretty easy.
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    We got taught PEEZER which if you follow it, its a lot easier to get A/A* in your exams. It stands for Point, Evidence, Explain, Zoom in on a word, Explain, Readers Response
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    (Original post by AAK151099)
    We got taught PEEZER which if you follow it, its a lot easier to get A/A* in your exams. It stands for Point, Evidence, Explain, Zoom in on a word, Explain, Readers Response
    This is good! Thats exactly what I did. I forgot to mention the zooming in on a word- so use evidence as a whole chunk from the text, briefly explain that then zoom in with those fancy linguistics! That really will get you those marks
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    I can honestly say that English Lit and English Lang last year at GCSE were my easiest A*'s. I actually didn't revise at all, just did the work that was set in class and my homework. Probably it's because I have such a passion for English.

    I would say with English Lit, you have to read the question twice and really try to understand what the question is asking of you. The PEEEL technique you're using will really help you. Also, I recommend you read your text twice just to make it faster in the exam as you'll know where what you want to talk about is much faster and thus save a lot of time.I'm sure you've already done your coursework? For Lit, I did A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller and got an A*. My text for the exam was Of Mice and Men and I think that was pretty easy. What texts are you doing?

    For the poems, I think as long as you have an overview of the poem; what it's about, certain language techniques used, the structure and what it means, what the title is saying, etc, then you won't have a problem. Also, I think you would have done this already, but look at every other poem and find what it can be compared with and what similar themes each poem has with another. For the unseen, most of time it's written by at least a poet you would have already studied before. Sometimes this isn't the case, but if it is then you can see that every poet has a certain theme to their poems. Let's use Maya Angelou for example. Amazing poet whose poems are 99% of the time about women and their hardship as she's had a very hard childhood herself, and I guess you can take it from there and help that back up your analysis of her poems and show the examiner you really know your stuff.

    If a completely random poet you haven't heard of comes up, don't worry! ALWAYS think about the title; what could it mean? Is there any particular language? How many stanzas are there? How many punctuation is used? What could this mean? Obviously, before I forget, you'd have to consider what the poem is about and that will make it easier for you. YOU CAN WRITE ANYTHING YOU THINK AS LONG AS YOU JUSTIFY IT. Honestly, that's the best thing about English! There are literally no right or wrong answers as long as you can back your answer up!

    I'm also doing English Lit at A level now and it's so much fun! Still pretty easy, too!
    Good luck!

    PS: Sorry if this was long. I just really want to help out. Your teacher has already probably told you half, if not all, of the things that I just wrote, but oh well! Good luck.
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    Memorise quotes! Lots of them!
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    If I can get an A* in the mock then Anyone can.
    Literally though, I hate english.
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    I did it and English is my second language! And my unseen poem was on bats. Be original, I'm sure there's thousands of kids who all churn out the same ideas, being perceptive and analysing the language is key, but don't go overboard and be too far fetched. CLARITY is ESSENTIAL. In PEED, make sure your point is really clear and don't make it too narrow, or you might struggle to find evidence. Best of luck.
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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    Spent the whole year getting 3/20 and low marks like that last year in lit, accepted fate because I had such a bad work ethic but came out with an A*. I told a sixth former friend about it bc she wanted to do lit at uni, so she offered to help me and it did. Just 20 minutes during thursday PM reg, she sat me down with a random poem and got me to talk about it. I was so stiff and couldn't come up with anything at first, but within weeks I was writing paragraphs about them and surprised by what I could do. Remember to stick to PEE paragraphs and stick to that only, linkig sentences with snazzy words like "thus" "furthermore", or if you do a language think about all the connectives you're made to use in writing and use those. I used to get panicky over "How do I even know if its worth of a point???" in the exam, but NEVER be afraid to point out the obvious. The text is 100% your canvas and you can think about absolutely anything, as long as you use evidence and PLEASE use loads of evidence whilst in your writing (forgot the word for it) like: 'Knowing the write explains the cat as "extremely fluffy", it also links into the 1735 battle of kittens'. Use adult vocab, compliment the author as much as possible e.g "Orwell cleverly states that" bc examiners are english nerds an if they think you <3 their people they will love you. Don't be afraid to be controversial, and the more evidence the better. Know your way around your books, be aware of context and just enjoy the exam really
    I think you just saved my grade, I'm aiming for an A in Lit and this is EXACTLY what I needed Thank you soooooo much!
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    (Original post by haszerdo)
    I can honestly say that English Lit and English Lang last year at GCSE were my easiest A*'s. I actually didn't revise at all, just did the work that was set in class and my homework. Probably it's because I have such a passion for English.

    I would say with English Lit, you have to read the question twice and really try to understand what the question is asking of you. The PEEEL technique you're using will really help you. Also, I recommend you read your text twice just to make it faster in the exam as you'll know where what you want to talk about is much faster and thus save a lot of time.I'm sure you've already done your coursework? For Lit, I did A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller and got an A*. My text for the exam was Of Mice and Men and I think that was pretty easy. What texts are you doing?

    For the poems, I think as long as you have an overview of the poem; what it's about, certain language techniques used, the structure and what it means, what the title is saying, etc, then you won't have a problem. Also, I think you would have done this already, but look at every other poem and find what it can be compared with and what similar themes each poem has with another. For the unseen, most of time it's written by at least a poet you would have already studied before. Sometimes this isn't the case, but if it is then you can see that every poet has a certain theme to their poems. Let's use Maya Angelou for example. Amazing poet whose poems are 99% of the time about women and their hardship as she's had a very hard childhood herself, and I guess you can take it from there and help that back up your analysis of her poems and show the examiner you really know your stuff.

    If a completely random poet you haven't heard of comes up, don't worry! ALWAYS think about the title; what could it mean? Is there any particular language? How many stanzas are there? How many punctuation is used? What could this mean? Obviously, before I forget, you'd have to consider what the poem is about and that will make it easier for you. YOU CAN WRITE ANYTHING YOU THINK AS LONG AS YOU JUSTIFY IT. Honestly, that's the best thing about English! There are literally no right or wrong answers as long as you can back your answer up!

    I'm also doing English Lit at A level now and it's so much fun! Still pretty easy, too!
    Good luck!

    PS: Sorry if this was long. I just really want to help out. Your teacher has already probably told you half, if not all, of the things that I just wrote, but oh well! Good luck.
    Thanks so much


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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    This is good! Thats exactly what I did. I forgot to mention the zooming in on a word- so use evidence as a whole chunk from the text, briefly explain that then zoom in with those fancy linguistics! That really will get you those marks
    Your paragraph at the start of this thread has saved my life just a question, I always struggle with the introduction. Say, if the question was "how does <insert name> present love in <insert play>?", do I answer it straight away, and lead it up with some quotes, give a roundup of the whole play, or what..? It always catches me and puts me in a bad thought pattern, it would be so helpful if you are able to tell me how you introduce the essay thankssssss
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Your paragraph at the start of this thread has saved my life just a question, I always struggle with the introduction. Say, if the question was "how does <insert name> present love in <insert play>?", do I answer it straight away, and lead it up with some quotes, give a roundup of the whole play, or what..? It always catches me and puts me in a bad thought pattern, it would be so helpful if you are able to tell me how you introduce the essay thankssssss
    I remember reading somewhere that you should always start the essay with a short sentence. Such as; <insert name> presents love in <insert play> through many different methods. We can first see this when... (then explain the first point).

    You do NOT have to write up an introduction, that would waste time and from what I've heard, you don't gain extra marks from it. So you should only write up a short, concise sentence to introduce what you're writing about. Just try and get to your points almost immediately.

    And then you continue with it, backing up your points with quotes as often as you can
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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    compliment the author as much as possible e.g "Orwell cleverly states that" bc examiners are english nerds an if they think you <3 their people they will love you.
    This made me laugh so hard
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    this thread made my day
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    (Original post by igcsessuck)
    I remember reading somewhere that you should always start the essay with a short sentence. Such as; <insert name> presents love in <insert play> through many different methods. We can first see this when... (then explain the first point).

    You do NOT have to write up an introduction, that would waste time and from what I've heard, you don't gain extra marks from it. So you should only write up a short, concise sentence to introduce what you're writing about. Just try and get to your points almost immediately.

    And then you continue with it, backing up your points with quotes as often as you can
    Thank you! That's really helpful to know, never will I write a six line introduction ever again
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    (Original post by MBK14)
    How hard is it to get A* in English Literature GCSE?
    If your coursework is alright as well
 
 
 
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