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    They've never exceeded 59 in the whole lenght of the course, it's usually 58, above 60 would be pushing it
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    (Original post by JCB97LAW)
    They've never exceeded 59 in the whole lenght of the course, it's usually 58, above 60 would be pushing it
    June 2014 was 60 for an A so cause this year is a resit it cud be and it wasnt extremely difficult either
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    (Original post by AboutAWeekAgo)
    June 2014 was 60 for an A so cause this year is a resit it cud be and it wasnt extremely difficult either
    Never realised June 2014 was 60, still, the exam paper was no the easiest there has been, i would say 60 is the highest it would go, paper was not easy enough to be as high 61 or 62, regardless of retake students
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    (Original post by JCB97LAW)
    Never realised June 2014 was 60, still, the exam paper was no the easiest there has been, i would say 60 is the highest it would go, paper was not easy enough to be as high 61 or 62, regardless of retake students
    And Unit 2 for that year was 54, which is ridiculously low, so UMS wise, if you got 57 in both papers, that would be an A overall
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    (Original post by JCB97LAW)
    And Unit 2 for that year was 54, which is ridiculously low, so UMS wise, if you got 57 in both papers, that would be an A overall
    It doesn't matter what previous years have been.... It's all calculated on the proportion of grades each year. This year will be the highest logically. There will be more people in the 60-75 range and thus as the boundaries are set by the percentiles of results it would be sensible to realise the boundary for the A would be within the 60s.


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    Well yes it does matter what previous years have been, because every year there is resit students who will push those boundaries up, plus, those doing resits are those who didn't do well the first time round, suggesting that actually, the students taking this exam are not of the highest ability despite doing A2, therefore, the grade boundaries won't neccesarily be higher because we are resit students, infact, you could argue that since no student taking the exam will be going over Unit 1 again in lessons like they did year-12, there's a high chance many students will fail, as even Unit 3 doesn't overlap Unit 1 a whole lot. It is very unlikely the grade boundaries will exceed 61, and with what I just said I expect they'll be average again, if not only a little higher, therefore I reckon the grade boundary will be between 58-60
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    (Original post by BA.Peluso Rt Hon)
    It doesn't matter what previous years have been.... It's all calculated on the proportion of grades each year. This year will be the highest logically. There will be more people in the 60-75 range and thus as the boundaries are set by the percentiles of results it would be sensible to realise the boundary for the A would be within the 60s.


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    Well, considering all the January exams are also retake students, students who only done the exam 6 months previously would have just finished Unit 3 A2 at school, you would assume that the grade boundaries for the January exams would also 'logically' be higher, but they aren't, so, and considering there has no been a one year gap since when we all the sat the exam, students are more than likely to do worse than those who had the chance to resit in January
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    Name:  image.jpg
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Size:  498.7 KB Multiple choice #24 what did you answer?
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    (Original post by Middriver)
    Name:  image.jpg
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Size:  498.7 KB Multiple choice #24 what did you answer?
    Answer C is right I believe, can't remember If i put that in exam, I should of done, do you have the 2016 paper??
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    Yes, doesn't C shift the supply curve and the externality is in consumption? So you would need demand management for optimum allocation?

    Meant to quote you jcb
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    (Original post by JCB97LAW)
    Answer C is right I believe, can't remember If i put that in exam, I should of done, do you have the 2016 paper??
    Meant to quote above ^
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    Does anyone have mutiple choice questions from the 2016 resit aqa paper?
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    (Original post by Middriver)
    Yes, doesn't C shift the supply curve and the externality is in consumption? So you would need demand management for optimum allocation?

    Meant to quote you jcb
    Yeah it does shift supply, but this on the graph therefore leads to less being consumed as the price level of the good goes up, and so the number of people who demand it decreases, its a tricky one like that
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    Does anyone have mutiple choice questions from the 2016 resit aqa paper???? Its been a long time now
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    (Original post by Middriver)
    Yes, doesn't C shift the supply curve and the externality is in consumption? So you would need demand management for optimum allocation?

    Meant to quote you jcb
    Imagine just a normal supply and demand curve, if you impose a tax, less is demanded and price goes up, same applies to externalities in both consumption and production, the shift of supply left leads to less being demanded i.e consumed
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    (Original post by JCB97LAW)
    Imagine just a normal supply and demand curve, if you impose a tax, less is demanded and price goes up, same applies to externalities in both consumption and production, the shift of supply left leads to less being demanded i.e consumed
    Very confused, don't you have the missallocation of resources from the MSB/MPB can you use a normal supply/demand? I get that MPC=MSC so that's one line for supply but isn't there two demand curves? Oh well that was the only MC I didn't get thanks for replying anyway
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    (Original post by JCB97LAW)
    Imagine just a normal supply and demand curve, if you impose a tax, less is demanded and price goes up, same applies to externalities in both consumption and production, the shift of supply left leads to less being demanded i.e consumed
    Does less being consumed=optimal allocation? I thought that was where there was no externalities.
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    (Original post by Middriver)
    Very confused, don't you have the missallocation of resources from the MSB/MPB can you use a normal supply/demand? I get that MPC=MSC so that's one line for supply but isn't there two demand curves? Oh well that was the only MC I didn't get thanks for replying anyway
    I just meant the impact of a tax on a normal supply and demand curve will have the same impact on an externality, yeah so two demand curves, a tax will shift that single supply curve (MPC=MSC) to create a new single supply curve (MPC=MSC plus tax), which on the externality diagram means that on the split demand curve, the supply curve is now located further to the left, resulting in less quanity demanded, and thus bringing society closer to the optimum point.. Make sense?
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    (Original post by Middriver)
    Does less being consumed=optimal allocation? I thought that was where there was no externalities.
    No, externalities will always exist, but there is an optimal amount desired by society, for example, we know that firms will have to pollute in some way, so it would be impossible for there to be no pollution, as a society its up to us to decide what the limit of pollution we want will be, so the optimal point won't be where there is no externalities, but the limit on what society wants the externality to be, in addition, externalities occur when the third party cost isn't accounted for in price, so a tax would account for the externality via a higher price, so the externality still exists, but its socially optimum amount because this externality is accounted for in the price of the good..
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    Anyone retaking Unit 2?
 
 
 
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