Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Should I risk an episode of craziness again, or should I sitck to depression? watch

    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    More obstacles for me I guess. Still, didn't realise just how backwater my town is...
    life will throw loads of those at us all... just got to try to get round them
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Other ways. I've been on it for years without any 'addiction' problems though.
    To be honest, too many things have gone wrong. It's all irreversible now. It really is. I've never had therapy. I don't understand how it could help anyone and I think it might just be a placebo effect for many people. I don't know what to do with life...
    Have you had any periods of time without the benzos? Sometimes we don't realise how much we are dependent on it until we go without it. Even if there is no physical dependency there may well be a psychological element to it. I'm not sure what has gone wrong for you in the past, however, in the type of work I do (work in mental health), I've come across people who feel that there is nothing that can be done to reverse the pain and suffering they find themselves experiencing. However, I would say that the overwhelming majority of those who engage well with support such as therapy do recover and improve their quality of life. There are so many types, and they all work in different ways, and for the main ones used, there is an evidence base. For example, a common therapy used in trauma, Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) has been shown to be very effective. CBT is another therapy which has a very strong evidence basis for depression and anxiety. We don't necessarily need to understand why it helps people, that isn't important (however there will be sources out there which will tell you), but the fact is that it does work. Medication can also work for some people.

    To be honest, if you 100% feel that therapy won't work, then it won't, you have to have even a little bit of faith that it will. Yes there will be people who will say that this didn't work for them or whatever, however, there are also a lot of people out there who have got better thanks to support from professionals. It is up to you if you take the support that it is out there.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by bullettheory)
    Have you had any periods of time without the benzos? Sometimes we don't realise how much we are dependent on it until we go without it. Even if there is no physical dependency there may well be a psychological element to it. I'm not sure what has gone wrong for you in the past, however, in the type of work I do (work in mental health), I've come across people who feel that there is nothing that can be done to reverse the pain and suffering they find themselves experiencing. However, I would say that the overwhelming majority of those who engage well with support such as therapy do recover and improve their quality of life. There are so many types, and they all work in different ways, and for the main ones used, there is an evidence base. For example, a common therapy used in trauma, Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) has been shown to be very effective. CBT is another therapy which has a very strong evidence basis for depression and anxiety. We don't necessarily need to understand why it helps people, that isn't important (however there will be sources out there which will tell you), but the fact is that it does work. Medication can also work for some people.

    To be honest, if you 100% feel that therapy won't work, then it won't, you have to have even a little bit of faith that it will. Yes there will be people who will say that this didn't work for them or whatever, however, there are also a lot of people out there who have got better thanks to support from professionals. It is up to you if you take the support that it is out there.
    Yes, I tested that, I can go a week or two without any problems. I guess I might try to do some research on what my options are.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yes, I tested that, I can go a week or two without any problems. I guess I might try to do some research on what my options are.
    If you want to look at therapists/counsellors without going to a Dr and can afford to go private (some can be not too expensive, and may offer concessions - around £30 a session) - this site is good - http://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by bullettheory)
    If you want to look at therapists/counsellors without going to a Dr and can afford to go private (some can be not too expensive, and may offer concessions - around £30 a session) - this site is good - http://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/
    I will have a look at them thanks. I guess trying one session wouldn't kill me. It might be better than going through my gp
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I will have a look at them thanks. I guess trying one session wouldn't kill me. It might be better than going through my gp
    I see a psychotherapist I found on there and I must say that he has been fantastic and helped me a lot.
    • #2
    #2

    OP as someone who has had mental health problems themselves, I would really advise you to see a doctor. I don't know your situation but it's true that circumstances can cause you to feel depressed but there is nothing wrong with asking for help if you need it, even if it is just temporary. Unfortunately certain situations can also make an underlying condition worse as was the case for me but again. If citalopram makes you feel worse, it's not a good idea to take it but only a doctor will be able to advise you which medication might work better for you. Personally I have found therapy very helpful but it only worked for me in combination with medication. I felt very nervous when I first went to see a doctor about my mental health problems too but I'm glad I did as I wouldn't have been able to get bette otherwise.
    • #2
    #2

    OP as someone who has had mental health problems themselves, I would really advise you to see a doctor. I don't know your situation but it's true that circumstances can cause you to feel depressed but there is nothing wrong with asking for help if you need it, even if it is just temporary. Unfortunately certain situations can also make an underlying condition worse as was the case for me. If citalopram makes you feel worse, it's not a good idea to take it but only a doctor will be able to advise you which medication might work better for you. Personally I have found therapy very helpful but it only worked for me in combination with medication. I felt very nervous when I first went to see a doctor about my mental health problems too but I'm glad I did as I wouldn't have been able to get bette otherwise.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Ok, so I've been depressed plus suffering from anxiety for many years now (since college, early 20s now, getting worse - rarely ever leave the home etc., keep making my partner unhappy with my ****., I also take benzos a few times a week. For anxiety and just because I've nothing better to do and they make me feel better for a short time.
    Last time I tried citalopram, it nearly drove me insane, I became obsessed with weird creepy stuff, conspiracies, death and didn't sleep for 2 days straight. I've no access to other antidepressants at the moment but I still have citalopram left, lots of it. I went to see a psychiatrist once but he misdiagnosed me with bipolar so not seeing a doctor about my problems. I don't want therapy either. I just need to know if I should try citalopram again, or keep rotting away like i'm doing now....................
    So try something else. Citalopram is magic for me. I've never heard of someone not sleeping, though when I haven't taken them for a while I do get pretty vivid dreams.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    OP as someone who has had mental health problems themselves, I would really advise you to see a doctor. I don't know your situation but it's true that circumstances can cause you to feel depressed but there is nothing wrong with asking for help if you need it, even if it is just temporary. Unfortunately certain situations can also make an underlying condition worse as was the case for me. If citalopram makes you feel worse, it's not a good idea to take it but only a doctor will be able to advise you which medication might work better for you. Personally I have found therapy very helpful but it only worked for me in combination with medication. I felt very nervous when I first went to see a doctor about my mental health problems too but I'm glad I did as I wouldn't have been able to get bette otherwise.
    Thanks for sharing your experience.

    (Original post by ThatOldGuy)
    So try something else. Citalopram is magic for me. I've never heard of someone not sleeping, though when I haven't taken them for a while I do get pretty vivid dreams.
    How long did it they for it to start working?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: May 17, 2016
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.