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    (Original post by PhysicsIP2016)
    As far as I am aware it will only affect 2017/18 students and people who start this year will have the standard £9000 a year tuition fees. I feel for them so much, what with A-Level reforms and now potentially a future brimming full of more debt
    Oh god the A-Level reforms, those poor sods.

    I'm sure we'll get slammed with the fee rise in second year though.
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    (Original post by TheGreatPumpkin)
    I'm thinking the same thing, I've looked into applying to do chemistry at Groningen, the only thing I'm concerned about is the job market, here if you do a year in industry you are almost guaranteed a job (or so I've heard), but I'm not sure how it would work over there.
    You want to do chemistry too?

    *High fives*

    What's wrong with moving back over here after you've done your degree? You could argue that you would be more attractive to employers as you would have picked up both language skills and demonstrated that you are willing to go out of your comfort zone. Or maybe you could do internships in Britain over the summer?
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    (Original post by PhysicsIP2016)
    As far as I am aware it will only affect 2017/18 students and people who start this year will have the standard £9000 a year tuition fees. I feel for them so much, what with A-Level reforms and now potentially a future brimming full of more debt
    Ah, phew.
    I'm not affected as I'm going to university this year.

    Yea, I feel bad for them with the rising tuition fee. It's not likely that the teaching will improve that much anyways, if at all.

    It's like an education tax on the poor.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Even for something like Chemistry (an STEM subject that TSR loves so much) about 60% of my course I'd say was just sat in a class getting droned at. But that was at an ex-poly which tend to be more practical based teaching by nature. I can't imagine how many lectures Russell group students sit through
    You say that like you were forced into a Chemistry degree against your will.

    (Original post by Peppercrunch)
    It's like an education tax on the poor.
    No, it's a tax on graduates. Why are you entitled to a free degree, at the expense of the people who go straight into work after school?
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    You want to do chemistry too?

    *High fives*

    What's wrong with moving back over here after you've done your degree? You could argue that you would be more attractive to employers as you would have picked up both language skills and demonstrated that you are willing to go out of your comfort zone. Or maybe you could do internships in Britain over the summer?
    It's simply due to the lack of options if I do a Bsc there, I'm considering doing a Bsc here then postgraduate in the Netherlands, that way I will have (hopefully) established business links here which I can turn to if all hell breaks loose. Regardless, I intend to go to the open day and find out what kind of links they have to the chemical industry etc.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    You said student numbers would drop, I've pointed out that historical figures show otherwise.



    I don't need an argument. I just quoted a fact which threw your entire rant out of the window. But don't worry yourself too much about it because I suspect you're one of the regular trolls around here just trying to get a rise so I'll leave it at that
    "I don't need an argument" oh dear what a joke.

    I don't know why you seem to doubt this, a rise in price will lead to a fall in demand. And yes, just because university numbers increased does not mean many people have not been discouraged, all sorts of factors such as increased requirements in the job market for a degree, a rise in the quality of UK universities and more international students all have caused this. Your very "fact" is fundamentally flawed, just because numbers have risen, is it acceptable for those less able to be barred from attending? Should the ones who can go be some of given the largest debts (higher than the US) for students in the world?

    You've clearly shown that you are an idiot, and I have better things to do, as entertaining as you might be.
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    (Original post by 16characterlimit)
    Oh god the A-Level reforms, those poor sods.

    I'm sure we'll get slammed with the fee rise in second year though.
    It hopefully shouldn't be as we have already effectively signed on for uni under the conditions of paying £9000 fees before they announced this, but I'm sure the Tories will try and find a way of implementing it anyway...
    My sister was the first in the cohort of the £9000 fees and I am pretty sure the year above still paid the lower fees.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    In what other walk of life do you get something for nothing?
    you wouldn't get university for NOTHING

    you would need to get the GRADES to get into uni in the first place. that in itself is a mountain to climb on it's own.
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    (Original post by 16characterlimit)
    "I don't need an argument" oh dear what a joke.

    I don't know why you seem to doubt this, a rise in price will lead to a fall in demand. And yes, just because university numbers increased does not mean many people have not been discouraged, all sorts of factors such as increased requirements in the job market for a degree, a rise in the quality of UK universities and more international students all have caused this. Your very "fact" is fundamentally flawed, just because numbers have risen, is it acceptable for those less able to be barred from attending? Should the ones who can go be some of given the largest debts (higher than the US) for students in the world?
    Oh dear indeed. You've tried to knock my understanding of basic economics yet show an ignorance to price elasticity.

    And I won't try to argue the 'poorer kids wont be able to afford uni' myth that has been repeated and disproven here many times before over the years.

    (Original post by 16characterlimit)
    You've clearly shown that you are an idiot, and I have better things to do, as entertaining as you might be.
    No need for name calling.
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    I do have to agree with you in this wholly; we're, on average, the country with the highest tuition fees. It's getting purely ridiculous. £9000 is way too much for anyone to even happily consider, even the rich Bourgeois, who exploit us proletariat lesser beings, if you take a Marxist point of view But on a serious note, you have got an extremely reasonable point. If my university tuition becomes too high, I will NOT in any way succumb to the governmental ideals. Then again...I'll be the one going to university. To study French...and Linguistics. *shies away from all sciences students*



    But they wouldn't. I simply said that I don't agree with the ideology that "university should be free". Sure, it should be accessible to everyone, but that's the basis of a student loan. I, myself, have been brought up in a family that went through benefits, and I got a scholarship into a private school. In no way am I saying I'm a special cookie, but I'm just pointing out that it should be simply accessible to all, not free.
    but why shouldn't it be free?

    Getting education from a school is free; why should unis be any different?
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    (Original post by 16characterlimit)
    is it acceptable for those less able to be barred from attending?
    Yes. If you're not smart enough for university, you shouldn't go.

    If, by "able", you mean financially, it is an established fact that higher tuition fees do not prevent poor people from going to university - if they did, I wouldn't be going. Under the current loans system, there is absolutely no reason why anyone should be unable to go to university.
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    (Original post by epic within)
    So should people also pay for your friends mortgage because they're desperate
    Getting a house and an education are 2 completely different things.

    You get an education -> Get a job -> Earn money -> pay for your mortgage for a house, or whatever

    Education should be free.
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    You say that like you were forced into a Chemistry degree against your will.



    No, it's a tax on graduates. Why are you entitled to a free degree, at the expense of the people who go straight into work after school?
    I was, in a way, after spending a year trying to get a job in my hometown with no success despite having relevant experience I just gave up and thought I might aswell go to uni, get any kind of job and then redo my a-levels later on down the line to get into the uni I actually wanted.

    (Original post by TheGreatPumpkin)
    It's simply due to the lack of options if I do a Bsc there, I'm considering doing a Bsc here then postgraduate in the Netherlands, that way I will have (hopefully) established business links here which I can turn to if all hell breaks loose. Regardless, I intend to go to the open day and find out what kind of links they have to the chemical industry etc.
    I guess that's sensible enough, it's just a shame none of the good Netherlands universities do med chem or anything similar
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    (Original post by pol pot noodles)
    How exactly is your friend unable to afford paying nothing upfront and nothing in repayments or interest until after she graduates and earns £21k?
    She's only doing GCSE's currently

    Actually, I didn't know that you don't have to pay Uni fees upfront; interesting point tbf.
    My ignorance may have got the better of me.

    In that case she probably will be able to afford it. She and I both presumed fees would be paid upfront.
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    (Original post by ZiggyStarDust_)
    Getting a house and an education are 2 completely different things.

    You get an education -> Get a job -> Earn money -> pay for your mortgage for a house, or whatever

    Education should be free.
    Why?A loan is a loan doesn't matter if its for education, a house or a car. No one should be paying for your degree, it's your choice to go to university not mine or anyone else. Everyone is able to afford to go to university, don't have the funds then take out a loan.
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    Yes. If you're not smart enough for university, you shouldn't go.

    If, by "able", you mean financially, it is an established fact that higher tuition fees do not prevent poor people from going to university - if they did, I wouldn't be going. Under the current loans system, there is absolutely no reason why anyone should be unable to go to university.
    Accommodation? Living costs in general? It isn't cheap and sometimes the loan (even the maintenance loan) only covers part of it and adds to the debt. While scholarships and bursaries can be obtained, they are competitive and not widely available, particularly for the people who are slightly over the threshold and therefore don't qualify. Also, the current loans system adds interest from the first term of university, so what you are paying back once you start earning is way over the £9000 a year that was promised. Not to mention that nowadays there are a lot of menial jobs that require degrees and do not pay nearly enough to cover the debt and living costs. It is very strange that you get people going to some of the best universities in the world and obtaining first class degrees that still have to live at home because the SLC are taking out a large portion of what they are earning so they cannot live independently.
    By no means should University be paid for by the government and it shouldn't be free either, but I simply do not see how increasing tuition fees would at all be positive for anyone.
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    (Original post by epic within)
    Why?A loan is a loan doesn't matter if its for education, a house or a car. No one should be paying for your degree, it's your choice to go to university not mine or anyone else. Everyone is able to afford to go to university, don't have the funds then take out a loan.
    it's also my choice whether I choose to do A Levels or not

    should we have to pay for those as well?

    why not, after all, no one should be paying for my education....
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    Dammit I could have applied for 2016 entry but I didn't as I decided to apply during my gap year ... Now I'm going to have to pay for that decision FML

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    I'm seeing if I can go elsewhere insteasd.
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    Do you need good a levels to study abroad?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
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