Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JSaintUK)
    How do you guys structure your paragraphs and how do you get into the a* bracket for woman in black?
    I don't tend to use a specific structure, but PEE is always a good bet, especially if you have trouble with focusing on the question. To get into the a* band, I would say thorough language analysis is imperative + link back to the question and Hill's purpose
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    It's not as good as Adult Learning. And besides, it's an AS/A2 level, which actually has barely any anthropology in...

    10 minute exams, with questions such as "Which one of these shapes is a rectangle?".
    Looks like I'm changing my a-level options
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etata)
    Looks like I'm changing my a-level options
    What did you plan on taking?

    Because Anthropology involves the Safir-Whorf Hypothesis and Chomsky. Quite simple really.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    What did you plan on taking?

    Because Anthropology involves the Safir-Whorf Hypothesis and Chomsky. Quite simple really.
    Maths, further maths, economics, chemistry - I also really want to carry on with French but analysing the history of sociopolitical commentary in literature.. in French.. is slightly above my level. And since I had to wikipedia both of those, I take it you're a linguist
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etata)
    Maths, further maths, economics, chemistry - I also really want to carry on with French but analysing the history of sociopolitical commentary in literature.. in French.. is slightly above my level. And since I had to wikipedia both of those, I take it you're a linguist
    Sure am! Interestingly enough, I'm doing French, and as much as I don't like the teachers, I can wing my way through French...
    #JustPolyglotThings

    And yes- linguistics is where I'm headed

    [Even if it'll help no one in society]
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    Sure am! Interestingly enough, I'm doing French, and as much as I don't like the teachers, I can wing my way through French...
    #JustPolyglotThings

    And yes- linguistics is where I'm headed

    [Even if it'll help no one in society]
    Wow, that's refreshing - are you fluent?
    I take French and Spanish, but I've always felt I'm good at languages only because I have a pretty good capacity for maths, since they're intrinsically linked. And what are you planning on taking for a-levels?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etata)
    Wow, that's refreshing - are you fluent?
    I take French and Spanish, but I've always felt I'm good at languages only because I have a pretty good capacity for maths, since they're intrinsically linked. And what are you planning on taking for a-levels?
    See, with Maths, I only really like the way that everything fits together; say, like, with algebra, it all has a set way of doing it, which I suppose links to grammar, which makes maths so much nicer. As soon as there is something missing, it annoys me.

    But yeah, I am fluent.

    And I am taking [at this point], English Language, French, Classics and Drama, but I may be taking Maths. I don't know yet.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    See, with Maths, I only really like the way that everything fits together; say, like, with algebra, it all has a set way of doing it, which I suppose links to grammar, which makes maths so much nicer. As soon as there is something missing, it annoys me.

    But yeah, I am fluent.

    And I am taking [at this point], English Language, French, Classics and Drama, but I may be taking Maths. I don't know yet.
    Yeah, I know what you mean, algebra's ridiculously satisfying but that really applies to most aspects of maths unless its something that can't really be visualised like, say, imaginary numbers.
    That's a good mix, I can tell you appreciate the arts, maths would fit in nicely too.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etata)
    Yeah, I know what you mean, algebra's ridiculously satisfying but that really applies to most aspects of maths unless its something that can't really be visualised like, say, imaginary numbers.
    That's a good mix, I can tell you appreciate the arts, maths would fit in nicely too.
    I'm in the same boat as everyone else as far as being a Renaissance Man is concerned. I've already learnt all the content for maths and further maths A-Level, but I much prefer the Arts to Stem. English is not as rigid and walled as maths, but instead allows the bleeding of colours into one another rather than allowing black to remain black and white to remain so, to speak allegorically.

    Everyone in my school wants me to do 5 A-Levels, and, as it stands, I'm looking at:

    Maths
    Further Maths
    History
    English Literature
    .... and maybe another.

    I am far more of a literary figure than I am a mathematician.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Redcoats)
    I'm in the same boat as everyone else as far as being a Renaissance Man is concerned. I've already learnt all the content for maths and further maths A-Level, but I much prefer the Arts to Stem. English is not as rigid and walled as maths, but instead allows the bleeding of colours into one another rather than allowing black to remain black and white to remain so, to speak allegorically.

    Everyone in my school wants me to do 5 A-Levels, and, as it stands, I'm looking at:

    Maths
    Further Maths
    History
    English Literature
    .... and maybe another.

    I am far more of a literary figure than I am a mathematician.
    That's interesting- incredibly varied- I find English and maths to be, in fact, harmoniously pitched (especially high level/abstract maths which involves the same kind of analytical thought process), which is perhaps swaying my choices away from the 4 I have picked. Although, English and MFL have a ludicrously heavy workload for a level, and I don't think that's the kind of pain I'd want to inflict on myself. Also, why have you already learnt the content for maths?

    I'm also considering doing 5, but since universities only look for 3 it seems unnecessary. 4 is a happy medium.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etata)
    That's interesting- incredibly varied- I find English and maths to be, in fact, harmoniously pitched (especially high level/abstract maths which involves the same kind of analytical thought process), which is perhaps swaying my choices away from the 4 I have picked. Although, English and MFL have a ludicrously heavy workload for a level, and I don't think that's the kind of pain I'd want to inflict on myself. Also, why have you already learnt the content for maths?

    I'm also considering doing 5, but since universities only look for 3 it seems unnecessary. 4 is a happy medium.
    I learnt the content out of recreation, and, before I even knew it, I had learnt all the content. Although English and Maths can be melodious together, I feel the two almost play off one another superficially creating the allusion of harmony like "two spent swimmers that do cling together, and choke their art".

    I'd do german for A-Level, as I'm already doing it for GCSE, if I was to pick a MFL.

    I fear we have significantly digressed from the purpose of this thread.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Redcoats)
    I learnt the content out of recreation, and, before I even knew it, I had learnt all the content. Although English and Maths can be melodious together, I feel the two almost play off one another superficially creating the allusion of harmony like "two spent swimmers that do cling together, and choke their art".

    I'd do german for A-Level, as I'm already doing it for GCSE, if I was to pick a MFL.

    I fear we have significantly digressed from the purpose of this thread.
    Evidently, we have contrasting definitions of 'recreation' but, all the same, I applaud your intellect. Generally, people gravitate towards either Maths or English, I think they can combine constructively - but only up to a point. Maths requires something of an inherent sense of logic and visualisation, rather than something which can be learnt.

    And I agree, would you like a quote to analyse?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etata)
    Evidently, we have contrasting definitions of 'recreation' but, all the same, I applaud your intellect. Generally, people gravitate towards either Maths or English, I think they can combine constructively - but only up to a point. Maths requires something of an inherent sense of logic and visualisation, rather than something which can be learnt.

    And I agree, would you like a quote to analyse?
    People do drift towards either maths or english, yet I wish to remain in balance with both and would love to do a joint degree in both (though no university offers this).

    Enough has been said

    Here's one for you:

    How does Hill present Eel Marsh House in the following?

    "The house felt like a ship at sea, battered by the gale that came roaring across the open marsh.

    That's all you're getting to make it as difficult as possible.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Redcoats)
    People do drift towards either maths or english, yet I wish to remain in balance with both and would love to do a joint degree in both (though no university offers this).

    Enough has been said

    Here's one for you:

    How does Hill present Eel Marsh House in the following?

    "The house felt like a ship at sea, battered by the gale that came roaring across the open marsh.

    That's all you're getting to make it as difficult as possible.
    Hill invokes nautical imagery to portray the isolation of Eel Marsh House, combined with its desperate vulnerability as a 'ship at sea'. This laces sibilants to mimic the swashing of the waves, immersing the reader in a vivid image of the turbulent ocean. The languid sibilants clash violently with plosives in 'battered', perhaps this is a metaphor for the woman herself, her conscience 'battered' by the 'gale' that is repressed guilt. 'Roaring' subverts this water imagery with fire, Hill creates a paradox, blending the two contrasting elements, to echo the mourning of the woman in black transformed into malignancy. Here, she presents pathetic fallacy in its raw, gripping form- fuelling the reader's fear for Arthur's safety.

    What do you think?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    If you touch on points outside the indicative content, will you still get good marks?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etata)
    Hill invokes nautical imagery to portray the isolation of Eel Marsh House, combined with its desperate vulnerability as a 'ship at sea'. This laces sibilants to mimic the swashing of the waves, immersing the reader in a vivid image of the turbulent ocean. The languid sibilants clash violently with plosives in 'battered', perhaps this is a metaphor for the woman herself, her conscience 'battered' by the 'gale' that is repressed guilt. 'Roaring' subverts this water imagery with fire, Hill creates a paradox, blending the two contrasting elements, to echo the mourning of the woman in black transformed into malignancy. Here, she presents pathetic fallacy in its raw, gripping form- fuelling the reader's fear for Arthur's safety.

    What do you think?
    Good! I like the analysis of language, though I am slightly concerned about how obviously, 'Roaring' relates to fire so that's a bit audacious. Also you could relate the ideas of nature to the sublime and I'd go as far as to say the following:

    The sibilance primarily evokes ideas of slightly calmer waves with a soft hissing. This is suddenly broken by the plosives suddenly turning calmer waters into the apparent battering "gales", where the sudden change not only exercises the sublime but also shows how unpredictable nature can be.This also further suggests how capricious and unpredictable the WIB herself can be, as the WIB herself is intrinsic to a supernatural realm of nature. This only creates greater terror in the reader as a "pig-headed" Mr Kipps wishes to reason with what is an unpredictable being, an embodiment of the unforeseeable sublime.

    Your turn to offer a quote
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Appazap)
    If you touch on points outside the indicative content, will you still get good marks?
    Well do keep it loosely to the question but do not fear flexibility. Often, better candidates do roam outside the content required and make links across the whole book.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    How do you guys find good quotes quickly?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JSaintUK)
    How do you guys find good quotes quickly?
    There is no such thing as a 'good quote'. Every quote can be analysed and manipulated to answer a question. Almost every line will have some literary device of some sort.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Also, what types of literary techniques are there to pick out of a quote such as plosives, sibilants etc. ?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: May 29, 2016
Poll
“Yanny” or “Laurel”
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

OMAM

Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

Notes

Revision Hub

All our revision materials in one place

Love books

Common grammar and vocabulary problems

Get your questions asked and answered

Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.