Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NeoMarxist)
    You're entirely missing my point (yet again). The state has to set the motions and, like you said, provide incentives for these company's to hire more. Or they need to find a way to create more jobs for graduates. You can't put such a high price on education if it's useless. If students won't get jobs anyway, there shouldn't be such a high price on education vice versa.
    You're right about the state needing to provide incentives to private companies to expand/start up. Nil rates for new small businesses in their first few years of operation would be a start and less red tape (of which there is still a lot) around the starting of small businesses would also be beneficial.

    The price of education is the cost of providing it, the figures aren't pulled from thin air and the debate is around who bears the cost. When fees were £3,000 p/a the government subsidised the other £6,000 or so, that's a huge subsidy nationwide. Now the government is no longer subsiding and the students are bearing the cost (as they rightly should) the public purse is roughly £800m p/a better off. Universities didn't suddenly come into a windfall of cash because the cost of providing university level education is much closer to the £9,000 than the £3,000.

    The State is still providing very generous loans for people who wish to take up higher education but unlike before most tax payer's money will now actually be paid back to the public purse rather than being lost in needless subsidies never to be seen again.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ambitious1999)
    Students should get income support and housing benefit to pay for food, books and accommodation in halls. This could be possible if we had things like mansion taxes and more taxes for the rich.
    Taxation, especially to the rich, will not and does not work. This alienation of the wealthy is misplaced and highly destructive in the long-term. As a society, we're essentially creating an environment where successful people should feel guilty for having gained wealth. Moreover, your line of argument assumes that all subjects and all students have the same net benefit for a society (they clearly do not).

    Rather than automatically assuming the wealthy should have to pay for this, students need to take on more responsibility for their future. Providing low interest loans or more scholarships is the solution. Interestingly, the very people you want to tax, are one of the largest providers of scholarships, see, for example: https://www.gatescambridge.org/about/people

    (Original post by Ambitious1999)
    Students are trying to better themselves and society should do all it can to help them achieve their goals starting with more contributions from the rich and the bankers.
    And why should society help all students? It is not our responsibility if a student wants to read Gender Studies, for example. I want to better myself too; but nothing exists to help me.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NeoMarxist)
    You're entirely missing my point (yet again). The state has to set the motions and, like you said, provide incentives for these company's to hire more. Or they need to find a way to create more jobs for graduates. You can't put such a high price on education if it's useless. If students won't get jobs anyway, there shouldn't be such a high price on education vice versa.
    I'm not missing your point; you're simply making an argument that I don't disagree with. However, your initial statement implied that responsibility for these incentives falls on the government, which it does not. The government needs to create incentives for companies to create the jobs and this usually happens in more general policies, such as lower taxes and less bureaucracy (basically, less government).
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.