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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I do agree with you to some extent but on the other hand, you really do need to have some basic understanding of maths to get through life and I don't think the expectations for C grade maths are too high. It's worth mentioning that a lot of countries have maths compulsory all the way up to the age of 18, so you're really not that bad off in the UK.
    Grade C isn't even that hard to get in maths to be honest
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    in both english and maths you learn some useless stuff but both set you up with basic levels of knowledge and understanding you will need to function well in society... I know it sounds silly but things like budgeting, working out bills/tips/change, there are lots of day to day situations where you need some basic maths/problem solving (the number of people on here asking how to work out what they need to get a 2.1 and whatever is insane, that is some really easy maths)
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    (Original post by Polarization)
    Grade C isn't even that hard to get in maths to be honest
    In your opinion.
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    It is more than fair; and I'm sorry but if you're struggling for 50+ marks on Foundation GCSE (which barely contains year 10 topics for higher students, let alone A level), then you will struggle to do anything maths related further on in your life. As to whether (if you aren't doing anything maths related) it matters; that's an entirely different issue.
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    Seriously I don't get people like you, GCSE maths is an absolute joke. So many people do nothing and come out with an A* in GCSE maths. Just revise and even if you are bad at maths you can get an A easy.
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    (Original post by Bernie2016)
    Seriously I don't get people like you, GCSE maths is an absolute joke. So many people do nothing and come out with an A* in GCSE maths. Just revise and even if you are bad at maths you can get an A easy.
    (Original post by Enjor)
    I'm on Foundation btw
    And so many people do everything and come out with a D, even an E.

    Also,

    (Original post by Bernie2016)
    even if you are bad at maths you can get an A easy
    God I can't wait to forget about Maths for the rest of my life...
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    (Original post by zayn008)
    Once I looked at A2 maths I felt sad… I took the fun and excitement in AS maths for granted lol next year seems like it's gonna be pure sweat and work. Did you do AS maths this year?
    Mhm. Was good crack once I worked out how to not be terrible at it.
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    (Original post by Enjor)
    And so many people do everything and come out with a D, even an E.
    Because they don't try, the government has realised that it's too easy hence why they are moving A-Level topics into GCSE and adding a top A* grade known as a 9. Along with this people will be expected to get more marks as the grade for a pass will be a 5 which is a high C and part of a low B. (Correct me if I'm wrong as I haven't been keeping up with the news on it)
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    Much of GCSE maths is pretty useless, and it needs reforming (though I dunno what the latest most recent changes were-perhaps they were for the better), but much is pretty useful, and to be honest I reckon almost anyone is capable of a C. (Though there is the issue of dyscalculia)
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    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    Mhm. Was good crack once I worked out how to not be terrible at it.
    It's quite simple if taken a step at a time, but it can be complicated and sometimes things just don't work even when you think you're doing everything right (sums up S1 for me)
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    (Original post by ombtom)
    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

    The closest thing to maths in Geography A-level is the disaster risk equation (risk = hazard x vulnerability / capacity to cope). This just makes me laugh a lot, sorry.

    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
    Sorry if I got that wrong, I don't do a level. Some of my friends talk about spearmans rank and stuff but I guess it's kind of just a plug in numbers sort of thing.
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    (Original post by harrietbh12)
    Don't you think I've tried that already? I've had maths tutors, I've tried to practice with multiple teachers, I've had my friends try to teach me, I've tried to teach myself. It just literally doesn't work. I'm sorry we can't all be as amazingly academic as you obviously are.
    Maths is hard. For everybody. The only solution is to throw hours at it. Lots of hours. Like, a lot more hours than you think.
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    (Original post by Charlotte.P)
    Sorry if I got that wrong, I don't do a level. Some of my friends talk about spearmans rank and stuff but I guess it's kind of just a plug in numbers sort of thing.
    Must be a different exam board
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    My 12 year old brother gets Bs...
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    (Original post by zayn008)
    It's quite simple if taken a step at a time, but it can be complicated and sometimes things just don't work even when you think you're doing everything right (sums up S1 for me)
    That moment when you do everything right and get a negative number or a value greater than 1 ect. You know you typed in something wrong into the calculator somewhere but you have no idea when so you just have to do the entire question again, especially if you are just given a table of values.
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    People that do bad at maths and don't enjoy it simply haven't put in enough work/effort (few exceptions). I fail to see how someone could not like maths. I think one you start getting some understanding in maths, you don't look back, your life changes .
    No but seriously everyone should have basic maths skills (grade C minimum).
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    You should at least be able to do basic arithmetic. Past that I don't think it should be compulsory, but very heavily encouraged.

    English isn't more important. If you've gotten to the age of 14 and can't understand spoken English then it's not going to help you. In that case you'd need some other kind of support, since the "teaching" for GCSE First Language English is usually given in English. Similar statements can be made about its supposed use in improving communication and students' writing abilities. As for improving everything else, how has your English GCSE improved relations with North Korea, your financial stability and your knowledge of PDE solution techniques?
    If you speak English as a first language, you should have become fluent in both spoken and written English in the 12 or so years that you used the language every day before starting your GCSE in English. If you speak it as a second language then it's more understandable and classes should be made available to focus on those students.
    All in all it's a waste of time.
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    (Original post by black1blade)
    That moment when you do everything right and get a negative number or a value greater than 1 ect. You know you typed in something wrong into the calculator somewhere but you have no idea when so you just have to do the entire question again, especially if you are just given a table of values.
    Or just write down what you've got and leave it until the end unless you have time left over. This isn't maths, this is exam technique: you're going to lose one mark at most for the mistake, and it'll take a while to fix, so leave it unless you've got time to burn.
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    (Original post by Enjor)
    Why does the government expect academic students (or everyone for that matter, since this will serve as an obstruction to someone at some point) to have at least a grade C in GCSE Maths? It's unfair on those who know that Maths - beyond what everyone needs to know for general life skills - will not be part of their further education (where they lack in Maths, they excel in English and other text-based subjects that open to just as many important jobs as a good knowledge in STEM would enable you to do) and potential employment.

    And with Edexcel moving onto a new GCSE program - which for some reason includes A-LEVEL topics in the syllabus, the exams will be made even harder and penalize those who only need the qualification for entry to colleges and Sixth Forms. This of course wouldn't matter to someone who is studying for a science subject or, well, further maths. From what I've heard from TSR as well there's a good chance they will raise the grade boundaries for this year's papers so I'm looking at getting a D instead of that one C I need over every other qualification (According to an unofficial mark scheme, a bit of harshness and a bit of memory, I'm within the 40's range on the first paper. That means I'll need to get 100 on the next paper using last year's boundaries as a model which is damn near impossible. I'm on Foundation btw)

    It simply isn't fair that the result of one GCSE - even if you get great or satisfactory grades in everything else - can decide whether you have to repeat Year 11 or not. It decides whether you stay behind or keep up with your friends - for social reasons, not competitive ones. There is the Functional Skills qualification, but it's pointless when the expectation and requirement still stands for a full GCSE, so it's a waste of time in all.

    In comparison to English - the other required GCSE - English is more important as it allows you to understand what people are really saying, improves communication, writing and everything else. You can apply the knowledge to pretty much everything involving people. Knowing your own tongue is much more valuable to life than figuring out where in life you'd have to use trial and improvement, or algebra, or circle theorems - topics specific to people who go onto study STEM, but not necessarily people who go onto humanities subjects like law, history or English.

    I hate all the expectation on Math. It has done nothing but harm my educational path. All the time I've used studying for something which I will never study or use again in life due to all the heartache it causes I could have been spending on honing my skills in English or other subjects.

    So considering people who don't intend to study science or maths beyond GCSE level, why is it still mandatory to get the latter at the correct grade?
    Everyone can get a C in GCSE maths. (hear me out)

    When I as doing my GCSEs in 2011 (when I as in year 10) I got a D in GCSE the first attempt and then the second time lucked out getting a C. (this is when I as 'bad' at maths)

    Now I have improved hugely

    Its all about how you revise and study, maths (at GCSE/A-level) needs lots and lots of practice questions (looking at where you went wrong), reading concepts and then looking at the worked examples to see how they go through the method. It is all about memorising the method of how to do it, nothing else, then checking you do know the method by doing questions

    I used these techniques when I as starting to improve in maths and now I study Theoretical physics at a top 20 university (though I use different techniques no as pure maths needs to be approached in a different way) which is the most mathematical degree other than maths that someone can do

    So the reason people dont succeed in maths is because either they arent putting enough practice in or they are working at it in the wrong way
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    Getting a C in Maths is almost like getting 50%. Is it really too much for the government to expect scoring half on your paper? & it's also only GCSE, there is hardly any challenging questions.
 
 
 
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