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    (Original post by inhuman)
    Whatever your views are on success of rehabilitation, at a very base level this is also about punishment.

    And 6 months is a ****ing joke for rape.
    Okay, but rationally speaking, why do people need to be punished? I am not saying they don't. The idea of someone not being punished extensively for such a crime doesn't intuitively sit well with me, but is there an actual objective reason it is necessary? What positive effects will it have? He has proven he is not fit to be in society, given the danger he poses, for now, so should be taken out of it, but he will be sent to a place where he will not learn how to fit in that society, quite possibly the opposite. If anything, a shorter sentence could be more optimal as he will experience the consequences of his actions, but not spend so long in prison as to just strengthen his demonstrable great lack of empathy and capacity for cruelty.
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    (Original post by BaconandSauce)
    Why are you comparing this case with a case from the USA?
    Maybe....because.... both happened in the USA... Brock Turner was a student at Stanford University in California and Corey Batey attended Vanderbilt University in Nashville......
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    In true internet fashion, the public are lighting their torches, sharpening their pitchforks, and making petitions. Why? Brock Turner of Stanford University was recently sentenced to 6 months in prison for raping a girl behind a dumpster. You'll have to Google it because I'm not tech-savvy enough to copy and paste links on my cellphone.

    A petition asking for the ruling judge to step down has already reached tens of thousands of signatures. Six months is far too lenient, apparently.

    What do you think - is six months enough for rape? Are you angry that he didn't get more time? I've been thinking about it, and I don't have a problem with it. Something I've noticed about myself when it comes to these matters is that I like to put myself in the shoes of the perpetrator. What if it was me? What was going through my mind when I did it? What would be enough for me to learn my lesson, to do penance? People don't often so this, I find. Imagine yourself in prison for six months. And yes, imagine being raped (while unconscious). Is it even the true purpose of imprisonment to provide equivalent suffering, or is it to rehabilitate? Which is most important?

    The controversy is also a race issue now, don't forget. Suddenly this is a case of 'white privilege.' Never mind OJ Simpson getting away with murder. Or that white guy on Making a Murderer being put away for life. I mean, imagine if he'd been black - that whole show would have been about how he was a victim of racism. "This doesn't happen to white people," we'd say, somehow forgetting that it does. Similarly, a white OJ Simpson getting off Scott free would've been held up as an example of 'white privilege.'

    I've gone off topic...
    u having a giggle m8?

    You trying to deny white privilege exists?.....LOL


    Also your logic is wrong. OJ Simpson is a celebrity. Same rules don't apply to celebrities as on nornal people (for one because they have millions of dollars at their disposal to hire lawyers to help get around the law).

    If OJ had been just an average black guy he would have been sentenced for life.

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    (Original post by IFoundWonderland)
    The judge said he didn't think he should have to spend the rest of his life paying for a misjudgement one night.

    Little did he realise that the victim will be paying for this for the rest of her life.
    Pfft Rape shmape.

    Acknowledge rape is no walk in the park, but anyone who acts like its some event that is going to scar / stunt you for rest of your life is a dramatist.

    You get over it like (almost) anything else.


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    (Original post by sazriah)
    Maybe....because.... both happened in the USA... Brock Turner was a student at Stanford University in California and Corey Batey attended Vanderbilt University in Nashville......
    Sorry my mistake (could have sworn this happened in the UK!)

    But yes American Justice is awfully skewed in cases like this (so much for Justice being blind)
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    (Original post by Nidhoggr)
    Pfft Rape shmape.

    Acknowledge rape is no walk in the park, but anyone who acts like its some event that is going to scar / stunt you for rest of your life is a dramatist.

    You get over it like (almost) anything else.


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    ...

    I have been raped twice.

    'Rape schmape'? 'No walk in the park'? How dare you trivialise it like that. Try flashbacks; constant suspicion; tears; and feeling constantly violated - even when you're alone.

    I hope I'll get over it 'like anything else', but for now it's difficult enough leaving the house.
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    It's terrible that rapists can no longer enjoy their T-bone steaks.
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    (Original post by Nidhoggr)
    Pfft Rape shmape.

    Acknowledge rape is no walk in the park, but anyone who acts like its some event that is going to scar / stunt you for rest of your life is a dramatist.

    You get over it like (almost) anything else.


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    Wow.....just wow. I don't even have any words for you.

    (Original post by IFoundWonderland)
    ...

    I have been raped twice.

    'Rape schmape'? 'No walk in the park'? How dare you trivialise it like that. Try flashbacks; constant suspicion; tears; and feeling constantly violated - even when you're alone.

    I hope I'll get over it 'like anything else', but for now it's difficult enough leaving the house.
    I'm so sorry to hear that has happened to you, I do hope it gets better for you, no one deserves to go through all that pain.
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    (Original post by SMEGGGY)
    OJ Simpson is ONE case does not factor out how many thousands of black rapists in US are sentenced! Idiot OP.

    Good he got a jail term. He'll be a ***** in prison.

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    He will only stay for three months and his daddy will pay for his protection.
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    No it was not enough- people who consciously and deliberately choose to inflict harm on another person are cruel, selfish and purely evil. Ok, you may question 'what if it were me in his situation' but then again, do you ever stop to think about the victim of rape? This is what aggravates me beyond measures.

    He decided to steal someone's innocence and in some cases life for his own sexual gratification and yes he was able to fulfil that, but how can 6 months in a cell even equate to the possible lifelong consequence on the victim?

    After the 6 months he will be out again enjoying freedom and next to his loved ones with the risk of posing more threat to other people and reoffending, while the victim will be scarred for life. In my eyes that is not justice, but simply injustice in its rawest form!
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    The incredible thing in that case is that there are two witnesses that are not related to either party, whereas rapes are often word against word situations, and yet it had no effect on the verdict.

    The second incredible thing is that the judge has been re-elected on Tuesday: http://www.people.com/article/judge-...d-swimmer-case
    :lolwut:
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    (Original post by Multiculturalism)
    So you actually think that its okay to rape people if they are unconscious?
    That's not what the guy said. Not even remotely.
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    I have a lot of conflicting thoughts on this story. On one hand, my gut instinct as a person who has been a victim of rape is to say 'let him rot in prison'. After having been put through that kind of trauma, I think it's only natural to feel some level of anger, disgust, or even hatred towards people who commit these horrible offences. However, I don't think in this case the guy went out there with the intention of sexually assaulting someone, and to begin with he probably didn't even know he was doing anything wrong. Is it an excuse? No. A truly decent person, no matter how drunk, wouldn't do what he did. But I can understand how men would find themselves, quite easily, in a similar situation. How many times have two drunk people gone home together and forgotten what happened the next day? The problem is, most people are not aware of what sexual assault and consent actually are, what they look like. It's not black and white, but a gradient. If he had taken her home, and she had agreed to go with him, and they actually made it to a bed and started fooling around, but like in this story, she became unconscious, but the guy didn't notice, so continued, would that be rape? If she woke up the next morning in his bed, not remembering any details of the night before, but because she was in a bed, she wasn't covered in scratches and dirt, would she think she had been raped? If those guys hadn't found her that night, and the guy finished off and then took her home and put her in a bed, would she have reported anything herself? I'm not suggesting answers to these questions, just putting them out there.

    Reading about this case, my opinion is that the attacker is not remorseful. He seems only to care about himself and does not admit he sexually assaulted that woman. As is often the excuse for this kind of sexual assault, alcohol is blamed as a way of taking the blame off a 19-year-old boy. 'Promiscuity' is also blamed here, which implies the victim is also partly to blame. I don't agree with the way this case was handled, but perhaps the publicity surrounding it will help a lot more people to understand what sexual assault is, so situations like this can be avoided by other 'promiscuous, drunk teenagers' in future.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Okay, but rationally speaking, why do people need to be punished? I am not saying they don't. The idea of someone not being punished extensively for such a crime doesn't intuitively sit well with me, but is there an actual objective reason it is necessary? What positive effects will it have? He has proven he is not fit to be in society, given the danger he poses, for now, so should be taken out of it, but he will be sent to a place where he will not learn how to fit in that society, quite possibly the opposite. If anything, a shorter sentence could be more optimal as he will experience the consequences of his actions, but not spend so long in prison as to just strengthen his demonstrable great lack of empathy and capacity for cruelty.

    Punishment may not be an effective measure in terms of reinstating the criminal back into society but I can guarantee you that it will at least bring a sense of justice and closure to the family.

    How can you even wake up in the morning and cope with the idea that your child's offender is enjoyig life while your child will turn to nothing more than just dust underground?

    Criminals see the world as an arena for their self-indulgence they don't care about learning or changing their ways, they don't think the same way we do, and are the least of humans, they harm and kill for their own pleasure, not even animals do that, they kill as a necessity.

    punishment is what they deserve- short sentences don't work anymore, they will go back out again and start the cycle again, and sadly, neither will education.
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    He should have been given much longer.
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    (Original post by Nerol)
    However, I don't think in this case the guy went out there with the intention of sexually assaulting someone, and to begin with he probably didn't even know he was doing anything wrong.
    Considering that he tried to run away when the two witnesses saw him, I think he perfectly knew that what he was doing was wrong.


    I agree with the rest of your post though. I think that alcohol is much to blame as it makes victims more vulnerable and potential rapists bolder. Hopefully marijuana will replace alcohol in youth parties as it is a less destructive way to get high. Universities should also appoint a "sober staff" to look after people who are drinking too much in parties.
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    (Original post by Multiculturalism)
    I bet you wouldn't say the same if it were a black rapist, or a white woman being raped.
    Why? They should all get six months
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    (Original post by FloralEssence)
    Punishment may not be an effective measure in terms of reinstating the criminal back into society but I can guarantee you that it will at least bring a sense of justice and closure to the family.

    How can you even wake up in the morning and cope with the idea that your child's offender is enjoyig life while your child will turn to nothing more than just dust underground?

    Criminals see the world as an arena for their self-indulgence they don't care about learning or changing their ways, they don't think the same way we do, and are the least of humans, they harm and kill for their own pleasure, not even animals do that, they kill as a necessity.

    punishment is what they deserve- short sentences don't work anymore, they will go back out again and start the cycle again, but neither will education.
    I suppose where the family is concerned the need for justice/recompense/punishment/whatever you want to call it is reasonable (even if it is still based in emotion, obviously these people are in unique circumstances relative to everybody else), and it would be more to their detriment to not punish, so from a point of view of minimising suffering, that seems like a decent justification.

    However I do think that people are nowhere near that simple. There are those who are psychopaths, who are fundamentally unable to empathise or integrate in a non-harmful way due to the way their brain works; they simply cannot be made to care about other people in any sense. However most people are just people, whether they commit crimes or not. Someone can do loads of good, and still commit horrific acts. Someone can be caring, personable, charitable, well-liked and kind, but in a moment of self-absorption/lack of empathy and idiocy, wanton or not, beat someone to within an inch of their life, rape someone, kill someone, anything. People can find ways of justifying all sorts to themselves, and despite having moral compasses that generally point in the right direction, and being very "good people" the majority of the time, be "evil" at times. Of course lots of people will have the self-control and consistent engagement with reality to not come close to doing this sort of thing, but the ones that do not are not necessarily nothing but pure evil who care only for their own satisfaction.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    In true internet fashion, the public are lighting their torches, sharpening their pitchforks, and making petitions. Why? Brock Turner of Stanford University was recently sentenced to 6 months in prison for raping a girl behind a dumpster. You'll have to Google it because I'm not tech-savvy enough to copy and paste links on my cellphone.

    A petition asking for the ruling judge to step down has already reached tens of thousands of signatures. Six months is far too lenient, apparently.

    What do you think - is six months enough for rape? Are you angry that he didn't get more time? I've been thinking about it, and I don't have a problem with it. Something I've noticed about myself when it comes to these matters is that I like to put myself in the shoes of the perpetrator. What if it was me? What was going through my mind when I did it? What would be enough for me to learn my lesson, to do penance? People don't often so this, I find. Imagine yourself in prison for six months. And yes, imagine being raped (while unconscious). Is it even the true purpose of imprisonment to provide equivalent suffering, or is it to rehabilitate? Which is most important?

    The controversy is also a race issue now, don't forget. Suddenly this is a case of 'white privilege.' Never mind OJ Simpson getting away with murder. Or that white guy on Making a Murderer being put away for life. I mean, imagine if he'd been black - that whole show would have been about how he was a victim of racism. "This doesn't happen to white people," we'd say, somehow forgetting that it does. Similarly, a white OJ Simpson getting off Scott free would've been held up as an example of 'white privilege.'

    I've gone off topic...
    6 months is too lenient.. FAR too lenient especially given how strong USA laws are in general.

    I would give his dad 6 months alone just for the letter he wrote.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Okay, but rationally speaking, why do people need to be punished?
    To serve as a deterrent to other prospective rapists.
 
 
 
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