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    (Original post by annieprincess)
    I agree, to be honest.

    If I could go back, I'd do BTEC. I've always been good at coursework, and never have tested as well. I don't really know why I chose to do A Levels and not BTEC. I guess A Levels just sound better. The thing is, you can do relevant BTEC courses and end up in the same position as someone who has struggled through A Levels. A levels, for me, are a lot more stressful, no matter whether it's science subjects, maths or economics, or if its artsy or essay based subjects like English, History and Psychology.

    A Levels aren't bad. I mean, they probably open more doors if you don't go to university than say a BTEC would do. You could end up at a fantastic university with your BTEC. D*D*D* is better, in my opinion, that getting BBB at A Level, and I'm pretty sure that whatever university you were looking for with BBB requirement would love to take you in with D*D*D*.

    I think unless you're getting really good A Level grades (A*-B), then there's no point. That's if you're good with coursework, and could achieve DDD or above.

    Although A Levels are seen as better by employers and universities, I honestly don't think it's worth the stress. I've cried over my A Levels, got countless amount of migraines over the stress and have already researched into clearing, in case I don't make my university choice.

    I have been accepted to do both a BTec and A-Levels, what would you suggest I do? BTec would be in public services and a levels would be in history, maths, gov&pol, law.
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    (Original post by CuriosityKTMC)
    What are you talking about? Firstly, doing maths will tend to cover a portion of physics (or the other way around), and also if you can't do one you're unlikely to be good at the other. If anything they're great to take together because they tie into each other so much.
    Not true, pure maths a level does not tie into physics unless if you choose the option of mechanic maths. Excuse you, I relatively good at maths getting a high B while in physics a U.
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    (Original post by BH1234)
    I have been accepted to do both a BTec and A-Levels, what would you suggest I do? BTec would be in public services and a levels would be in history, maths, gov&pol, law.
    I don't want to wrongly advise you, because it really depends on you. If you've always been good at doing coursework and don't really test well, go for the BTEC.

    It depends on what you want to do, as well. If you don't know what you want to do in uni yet at all, then maybe A Levels are the better option.

    For me personally though, A Levels just aren't worth the stress. I'm finishing A2 now, and I have friends who go to college and seem so stress free, and also have a lot of time while getting good grades.

    Another option would be mixing A Levels and BTEC. I don't mean the BTEC equivalent to 3 A Levels, by the way. I have a friend who does two A Levels and a BTEC, and got a D* in her BTEC. It also meant less exams for her. So for her, that's only two grades more she has to worry about, rather than 3. The one subject makes such a difference, I feel.

    I have another friend who is just doing one A Level, and two BTECs (IT and Business) so she made sure she met all her BTEC deadlines, kept on top of all of her coursework, got D* and D in her BTEC courses. Now, while I've been stressing about 5 exams, she just has 1 that she's been revising for since she finished her coursework in April/May. While it seems late to start revision, it's just one exam. It also means she has more free time, whereas I've been revising almost every single day, and the days I don't revise I like to stay home and relax because I'm so exhausted.

    It's really up to you. For me, I would do the BTEC, or combine A Levels and BTECs
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    (Original post by Language student)
    Not true, pure maths a level does not tie into physics unless if you choose the option of mechanic maths. Excuse you, I relatively good at maths getting a high B while in physics a U.
    I deliberately qualified both statements with 'tend to' and 'unlikely to' because of course exceptions exist, but the idea that the two together is by default a bad idea is ridiculous
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    The fact that A-Levels are so difficult and draining and time consuming compared to a BTEC is the exact reason they are more highly and widely regarded.

    BTECs may yield a lot of UCAS points, but name me a world class institution that admits on UCAS points? Exactly- they don't. A levels are respected for a reason. If they were easy, anyone could do it, and they wouldn't get you anywhere.

    If you don't test well, then yes, maybe BTECs are for you. But the best Universities and careers expect you to test well. So while I understand it may seem like the easier option to do a BTEC and get to uni, in the long run, A Levels are far more likely to take you further in academia and the workplace.

    If I had to choose again I'd go for A-Levels everytime without a doubt. No matter how horrible they can be.
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    (Original post by annieprincess)
    I don't want to wrongly advise you, because it really depends on you. If you've always been good at doing coursework and don't really test well, go for the BTEC.

    It depends on what you want to do, as well. If you don't know what you want to do in uni yet at all, then maybe A Levels are the better option.

    For me personally though, A Levels just aren't worth the stress. I'm finishing A2 now, and I have friends who go to college and seem so stress free, and also have a lot of time while getting good grades.

    Another option would be mixing A Levels and BTEC. I don't mean the BTEC equivalent to 3 A Levels, by the way. I have a friend who does two A Levels and a BTEC, and got a D* in her BTEC. It also meant less exams for her. So for her, that's only two grades more she has to worry about, rather than 3. The one subject makes such a difference, I feel.

    I have another friend who is just doing one A Level, and two BTECs (IT and Business) so she made sure she met all her BTEC deadlines, kept on top of all of her coursework, got D* and D in her BTEC courses. Now, while I've been stressing about 5 exams, she just has 1 that she's been revising for since she finished her coursework in April/May. While it seems late to start revision, it's just one exam. It also means she has more free time, whereas I've been revising almost every single day, and the days I don't revise I like to stay home and relax because I'm so exhausted.

    It's really up to you. For me, I would do the BTEC, or combine A Levels and BTECs
    I'm much better at coursework, For every GCSE I have gained an A* for any coursework elements whereas I'm getting Cs and Bs in exams.

    I know what I want to do at University, which is LLB (HONS) Law with Criminology, and would be happy with going to portsmouth uni to do this as its the most coursework orientated course there is for Law with Crim. I have rung the admissions office and have been told doing this course won't give me hardly any disadvantage over A Levels as long as i get at least DDD or above, which i think is very possible.

    Personally, I don't get stressed over the exams, but more stressed over the fact i have never had any motivation to revise and not matter how hard i try and revise it just doesn't work! This would extremely backfire at a levels and i believe it may make me fail them.

    I have been offered by my college to do a possible course combination that has only been done by few students at the college and is only offered if they truly believe your coursework ability is outstanding. It is the option to be able to do two level 3 extended diplomas, instead of 1, which would be equivalent to 6 a levels overall. This is very rare that people get offered to do this and am worried it might be just bit too much coursework. However, i have also been offered to do an a level in history or law alongside my BTec.

    Thank you for your opinion on the matter.
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    (Original post by hololand)
    So 2 years ago I made the choice to go through with A levels, My best friend chose the route of B-Tec level 3 extended diploma. Initially I laughed at him and thought he had made a stupid foolish decision.

    By the end of the first year I was getting weighed down by the 7 days a week constant revision from maths, physics, business studies and that coursework from art. Meanwhile my friend was merrily on his way with his 3 days a week of relaxed work and practical outdoors filming.

    And we arrive at the now. I have not been able to go out with friends on many occasions due to work. Nor have I had any significant free time to pursue my passion and hobbies. I have been locked away revising information that I will likely never need again just to get the grades for a university course of my choice.

    My friend meanwhile has already finished for the year, during which he has pursued and integrated his course into his passion for BMX. He has had more free time in the last two weeks than I have had in the entire year.

    And he just got his results back. Now at GCSE you must bear in mind he was a B/C student, I was slightly higher with pretty much straight B's. However he just got given D*D*D*, which is the equivalent of 420 ucas points or 3 A*'s at A level. Meanwhile after 7 days a week of far more difficult and challenging work constantly throughout the year, I have barely attained a prediction of BBB.

    I don't see how it is fair that 3 days of much easier and far more enjoyable work a week. Can almost DOUBLE the amount of ucas points of far more stressful, much more difficult A levels.

    Now obviously I am happy for my friend, I am currently contemplating my life and why I didn't choose the same option as him. But how... HOW is this fair?

    I have done just over 2x the work of easily 5x the difficulty and I am getting HALF THE REWARD?.

    Now obviously I cannot change the entire UK education system. But I warn anybody considering A levels to read up on this and consider how much pain you will go through for such little reward. Do BTEC's.
    But A levels aren't that hard? Why are you studying so much?
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    (Original post by Ras' Al Ghul)
    But A levels aren't that hard? Why are you studying so much?
    Although I have not done A-Levels myself, you have to understand everyone has a differently ability of learning and some feel it is harder to learn than others.

    Not trying to say this in a rude manner or cause any offence but it is similar with things in the everyday life as well, some people will always learn faster and not have to do as much hard work...
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    If I had a chance for a do over, I'd pick anything related to the degree I wanted to do that I could do via distance learning whilst working, get it out of the way within a year and then apply to do a foundation year at uni to plug any gaps. I've found a foundation year far more useful than any of my A levels in preparing me for uni work since I have to do university assessments which follow their marking scale, some of it has been the same as my A levels, but I was also able to branch out and study things like pharmacology and biochemistry in more detail. I didn't get to do any pharmacology at A level and wouldn't have thought of it as a degree option, but now I have an offer to transfer to KCL to study Pharmacology and Molecular Genetics. Aside from getting used to the way of working you get full student finance funding.
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    (Original post by BH1234)
    Although I have not done A-Levels myself, you have to understand everyone has a differently ability of learning and some feel it is harder to learn than others.

    Not trying to say this in a rude manner or cause any offence but it is similar with things in the everyday life as well, some people will always learn faster and not have to do as much hard work...
    I know, but studying so much is not healthy. I'm at uni and I don't study that much. Maybe the approach is wrong.
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    (Original post by Ras' Al Ghul)
    I know, but studying so much is not healthy. I'm at uni and I don't study that much. Maybe the approach is wrong.
    That I do agree with. One of my friends have made them self VERY ill over exams by revising and getting little sleep and not going outside at all, AND HE'S ONLY TAKING GCSE'S!!!
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    could not give two sh*ts about what you say or your experience
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I WILL DO A-LEVELS
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Did you ever consider that maybe, just maybe, the problem isn't the entire education system but it is rather yourself?

    I know plenty of people, who need only put in 5 or so hours a week into A-Levels to get A*A*A. Since, apparently, anecdotal evidence is all that matters.
    No, there are problems with our education system.
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    lmao maybe dont choose maths and physics together? that's quite a pain...
    Nottttt reallyyyyyyyy
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    I still wouldn't pick BTEC's over A-levels. I have friends (term used loosely) that do BTEC subjects and it just seems extremely dull and lifeless.

    I mean fair enough if your suited to coursework, but I'm not personally.

    However, I agree A-levels are an ABSOLUTE pain.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    No, there are problems with our education system.
    It's one of the best in the world...
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    As if D*D*D* at BTEC is equivalent to 3A*s at A Level
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    It's one of the best in the world...
    But there are issues with it and there need to be some reforms.

    One very obvious one is that not all students receive the same standard of teaching, not all of us are prepped the same. That may not seem like a big deal, and yes we are capable of teaching ourselves, of course we are (taught myself all of GCSE biology, absolutely not a problem) BUT it is unfair. I don't ask to be spoonfed but having a bad teacher causes unbelievable stress for students, at A-level it makes you feel like death. Honestly, there are things that need to be looked at.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    But there are issues with it and there need to be some reforms.

    One very obvious one is that not all students receive the same standard of teaching, not all of us are prepped the same. That may not seem like a big deal, and yes we are capable of teaching ourselves, of course we are (taught myself all of GCSE biology, absolutely not a problem) BUT it is unfair. I don't ask to be spoonfed but having a bad teacher causes unbelievable stress for students, at A-level it makes you feel like death. Honestly, there are things that need to be looked at.
    This

    I've gotten into the habit of essentially teaching myself all the content since GCSE that I sometimes forget that this isn't what my school experience should be like.
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    On my family whatsapp group my cousin doing BTECs sends us all pics of him going out to lovely parks and having fun in the sun and all sorts while I'm sat crying over my biology textbook. Gets a bit annoying sometimes
 
 
 
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