Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Did you vote LEAVE? Do you now regret this? Watch

Announcements
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lerjj)
    Haha, not salty. I am a bit aggrieved, but hey at least UKIP ought to go away now.

    Enjoy your independance day
    ha, no the battle only just began and with how remain voters are acting, looks like we will get more neutrals on our side
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by welshiee)
    Wrong. It is in the hands of politicians. If politicians put tax at 90% of income we wont get any business so they'd become irrelevant to the discussion. It is on the people in Westminster to do the right thing to bring business here that thrives and wants to stay here. As for the media, they need completely overhauling as they're a law unto themselves and have no morals whatsoever.
    True but to a large extent their hands are tied. They have obligations to provide services and infrastructure whilst ensuring enough money comes in to pay for it. And at the same time they are watching their own back for fear of being voted out. As a result most politics is rather short-termist. But if big business like say a major bank, or Rupert Murdoch says jump, most politicians will ask "How high?"

    We like to think of our politicians sitting behind a big desk with buttons and knobs that control the country but the reality couldn't be further from the truth. Politicians genuinely have little control over domestic matters. They have much more influence over foreign policy bizarrely.

    Listen to this excellent podcast that possess the question "How much does the President [of the USA] actially matter?"

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/much...r-rebroadcast/
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    If you're trying to make a judgement on whether the referendum was right or wrong after 2 days then you really are incredibly stupid, wait at least 2 years then see how you feel.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Not one bit.
    • Community Assistant
    • Political Ambassador
    • Welcome Squad
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I would have voted Leave if I was 18 years old, but I don't regret it slightly.

    People predicted a fall in the pound sterling last week, people knew this would happen. It is now gaining ground. The short-term is not a bed full of roses but the future looks bright and prosperous, hence the reason why I don't regret this decision at all.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I'm 18, voted leave and I'm over the moon. Just wish the anti-democratic remainers would either shut up or move to North Korea. Sure, voice your opinion on it, but a petition for another referendum? No chance.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I voted Leave. I would do it again. I'd crawl over hot coal to do it again.

    The "Regrexit" narrative is bogus, the Remain-biased TV broadcasters have tracked literally two or three Leave voters who say they regret it. Maybe they should interview the vast majority of us who absolutely don't regret it?

    Fact is, the MAJORITY of voters voted Leave, the majority of people are happy with the result. I know the Remain side is upset but you will just have to get over it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    The pound will also drop again when manfuctuers such as Nissan who use the UK as a gateway to the EU will leave for an EU country such as Germany.

    The economy will also be effected when we lose a significant amount of our skilled workers. The uneducated and ignorant won't all of a sudden become skilled, capable workers unfortunately.

    The economy will also be effected when our universities who are largely dependent on EU funding will be largely diminished, with many university towns who depend on their university to employ a significant portion of their population suffering.

    The economy will also be effected because businesses will be deterred form making new decisions, and new investments because of the uncertainty of our future. That is common sense. This will lead to reduced investment activity and reduced hiring. Less jobs= less wealth.


    After the two year window, trade flows will slow considerably, considering that half of UK exports go to Europe and we will no longer have access to the reduced tariffs and market access that members of the EU benefit from.

    This is alongside an abundance of other economic consequences you have to look forward to. And on top of that, we have to waste a **** load of money writing and establishing new laws and regulations that were perfectly fine in the first place.

    But yes, because the country one day after the referendum -when the exit process hasn't even begun- hasn't gone to the ground, that means that we are going to prosper more than ever doesn't it?

    Go bury your head in the sand some more and keep patting yourselves on the backs. Time will tell, and you'll be sorry.
    Erm nope.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by YorksKillerby)
    I voted Leave. I would do it again. I'd crawl over hot coal to do it again.

    The "Regrexit" narrative is bogus, the Remain-biased TV broadcasters have tracked literally two or three Leave voters who say they regret it. Maybe they should interview the vast majority of us who absolutely don't regret it?

    Fact is, the MAJORITY of voters voted Leave, the majority of people are happy with the result. I know the Remain side is upset but you will just have to get over it.
    This. It is pathetic. I was watching the news earlier and they made a narrative of "Leavers regretting their vote." In total, there were 2 people interviewed, and if they found more they definitely would have shown them.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Scott.)
    Erm nope.
    You'd have thought the Remainers would stop the fear narrative now that it's over. At least some have.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Samiz)
    You'd have thought the Remainers would stop the fear narrative now that it's over. At least some have.
    You actually have such little appreciation for how intertwined the UK is with the EU. 40 years of integration doesn't disappear over night. And while that uncoupling process occurs our economy will be in an extreme period of uncertainty. Investors are already refraining from UK investments and investing heavily in other areas such as the German bond market. If investments continue to move away from the UK you will start to see a reduction in growth (ie. jobs).

    Additionally, in order to access the single market (a prominent reason why companies invest in the UK in the first place) we'll have to agree to a lot of the very same EU regulations we voted to remove. These regulations will mostly be non-negotiable because the EU wont want our lax regulations with regard to health and safety or environmental protection undercutting operations in EU countries (not too unlike what China does to the West). That's not even mentioning the very real possibility of still having to agree to free movement of labour just like Norway and Switzerland.

    Oh and with regard to trade agreements, have you ever considered whether the UK even has the infrastructure in place to start setting these in motion? There are 52 trade agreements we need to set up just to reach par with what we had within the EU. Additionally, if you thought TTIP was extreme, just wait and see what a severely weakened UK would have to agree to when negotiating with the US.

    But that's all unimportant right? Let's just disregard pretty much every single expert who's commented on Brexit saying it's too big a gamble for such a little pay off.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Guys... A new poll for Sunday asking whether people are happy or sad with the result. More REMAIN voters said they were happy than Leave unhappy...though neither statistically significant. Also, country as a whole, 5% Lead for Happy over Unhappy.

    https://twitter.com/NCPoliticsEU/sta...08115459391488

    So, please, let's put to bed the idea that "Regrexit" applies to any more than a tiny minority of voters.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I voted Leave, I campaigned for the referendum and was always going to vote Leave, this was never in doubt.

    But I regret it already, I based my choice on my own views of the EU as an institution without taking into account how it would affect the lives and future of everyone else, I feel so guilty, I'm truly sorry everyone
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    There is a poll to ask Parliament to question the constitutional validity of the referendum. If you are concerned about it you may wish to sign:
    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/131215


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by looseseal)
    You actually have such little appreciation for how intertwined the UK is with the EU. 40 years of integration doesn't disappear over night. And while that uncoupling process occurs our economy will be in an extreme period of uncertainty. Investors are already refraining from UK investments and investing heavily in other areas such as the German bond market. If investments continue to move away from the UK you will start to see a reduction in growth (ie. jobs).

    Additionally, in order to access the single market (a prominent reason why companies invest in the UK in the first place) we'll have to agree to a lot of the very same EU regulations we voted to remove. These regulations will mostly be non-negotiable because the EU wont want our lax regulations with regard to health and safety or the environmental protection undercutting operations in EU countries (not too unlike what China does to the West). That's not even mentioning the very real possibility of still having to agree to free movement of labour just like Norway and Switzerland.

    Oh and with regard to trade agreements, have you ever considered whether the UK even has the infrastructure in place to start setting these in motion? There are 52 trade agreements we need to set up just to reach par with what we had within the EU. Additionally, if you thought TTIP was extreme, just wait and see what a severely weakened UK would have to agree to when negotiating with the US.

    But that's all unimportant right? Let's just disregard pretty much every single expert who's commented on the Brexit saying it's too big a gamble for such a little pay off.
    I thought you giving some rational points before the yet more fearmongering.

    "just wait and see what a severely weakened UK would have to agree to when negotiating with the US."

    It was only yesterday that Barack Obama disregarded his 'back of the queue' comment and assured Britain of their special relationship to America.

    You're speaking as if the EU doesn't need us. Germany's car industry needs us, you really think that the EU would risk jobs and an industry of their biggest contributor? No. Even the Canadian president assured us of our relationship.

    We voted to leave on Friday morning. Already USA, Canada, S Korea, Iceland, Ghana, Brazil, Norway, New Zealand, Australia, Switzerland have talked close trade relations with the UK. Also, out of the UK's top 10 non EU export markets, the EU has trade deals with 2.

    When the pound and the FTSE100 dropped after Brexit remainers hopped the gun, they couldn't wait to get at the Brexit camp. Yet when the pound rallied past February levels, and the FTSE closed on a weekly high, they weirdly went a bit quiet on that. We've just been the first country to vote to leave the EU, of course there will be uncertainty, but we expected this and were prepared for it.

    So talk down our country all you want, keep the fear stories coming, but I and many leavers will be excitedly looking forward to our future being able to negotiate our own deals and have our own laws, free from the clutches of Brussels.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Student1670)
    There is a poll to ask Parliament to question the constitutional validity of the referendum. If you are concerned about it you may wish to sign:
    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/131215


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hilarious. If you don't like democracy, I suggest you go and live in North Korea. We had an official poll on Thursday. 16 million voted for remain, 17 million voted to leave.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I voted remain, and a lot of my friends voted leave. Some were happy with the result as they should be since they won, others weren't and realised they had made a mistake.
    Either way, our country is now in the hands of someone else, and since we are leaving, we have to accept that and hope that this political change won't divide us anymore.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Samiz)
    I thought you giving some rational points before the yet more fearmongering.

    "just wait and see what a severely weakened UK would have to agree to when negotiating with the US."

    It was only yesterday that Barack Obama disregarded his 'back of the queue' comment and assured Britain of their special relationship to America.

    You're speaking as if the EU doesn't need us. Germany's car industry needs us, you really think that the EU would risk jobs and an industry of their biggest contributor? No. Even the Canadian president assured us of our relationship.

    We voted to leave on Friday morning. Already USA, Canada, S Korea, Iceland, Ghana, Brazil, Norway, New Zealand, Australia, Switzerland have talked close trade relations with the UK. Also, out of the UK's top 10 non EU export markets, the EU has trade deals with 2.

    When the pound and the FTSE100 dropped after Brexit remainers hopped the gun, they couldn't wait to get at the Brexit camp. Yet when the pound rallied past February levels, and the FTSE closed on a weekly high, they weirdly went a bit quiet on that. We've just been the first country to vote to leave the EU, of course there will be uncertainty, but we expected this and were prepared for it.

    So talk down our country all you want, keep the fear stories coming, but I and many leavers will be excitedly looking forward to our future being able to negotiate our own deals and have our own laws, free from the clutches of Brussels.
    You misunderstand. There's a significant difference between talking about trade deals, negotiating trade deals and getting a better trade deal than we had within the EU.

    Additionally, the FTSE 100 a week ago was actually at its lowest point in 3 months. So to compare our position now with a position of severe weakness is slightly disingenuous. Also, if you actually check the position of UK-based companies specifically rather than non-UK you'd realise that the improvement is significantly worse than the overall picture suggests.

    As always, the devil is in the detail.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    I voted Leave for numerous reasons and am pleased with the result which sounds increasingly like EFTA, my desired outcome given that even hardened Euro-skeptics like Daniel Hannan have been suggesting that we'll give some way on immigration in order to maintain access to the single market.

    I expected short term pain and market instibility however with 10 year gilt yields falling on Friday it looks as though even long term investors believe that the UK will be fine in the long run.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by toronto353)
    Delighted we voted to leave and I am so glad I voted this way.

    Also, stop with the petition and being a sore loser, you lost, get over it! :rolleyes:
    The government is already saying they could consider holding a second referendum because of the petition
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Should Spain allow Catalonia to declare independence?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.