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Only 36% of eligible young people voted in EU referendum... Watch

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    (Original post by Chakede)
    it is ironic that the 18-24 age groups are the most to be most affected by leaving the eu in the next few years be it stupidity, gullibility or apathy, its these fools that will be rioting in the streets in 3 years times when their benefits are cut , domestic price inflation rockets and there are no jobs left.

    perhaps most of the current young generation didnt realise shareing a facebook post =/= voting
    Or you could acknowledge that most people that were taking an unbiased point of view, which is more likely to be the younger generation due to not experiencing politics previously, seemed to mostly be undecided anyway. So rather than doing either a coin toss, reflecting their biased surroundings or spending a lot of time researching the mostly very basic information and misinformation out there, from actually which very little benefit would be gained in the end due to the opportunity costs, it was never that unfeasible to see a low turnout.

    I would also suggest it is likely to be the young voters and not the undecided/disinterested that will riot due to not being listened to.

    Finally, considering online polls and Facebook seemed to be dominated with more leavers till the very last week, I don't think you can say that.

    (Original post by The Roast)
    In conclusion, it isn't the baby boomers who screwed the young generations over, it's the young generations that ****ed over themselves.

    65+ had a 80%+ turn out, they were actually bothered about the vote.


    ****ing idiots.

    I feel like signing up for the Question Time in Preston and letting people know about it.


    OR even head down to Parliament Square with a "What about the 64%" poster haha!
    Not really, obviously the people who are saying that are the ones with opinions on it who probably voted. Hence, the old would be to blame as that is the demographic that generally went against them, not the young non-voters, who probably if were to start voting would follow the simple arguments and mostly vote leave anyway. And yes, this is actually what I have seen, that a lot of young voters who were slightly more towards 'leave' were the ones who didn't vote because they realised (were clever enough) to know that they probably didn't have the right solution, and didn't have the experience yet to develop proper political knowledge, not that most people had proper economic knowledge of the situation anyway.

    (Original post by Elivercury)
    Yeah, that all consuming 2 minutes to vote must really get in the way of "having a life".

    You can cite all the reasons you like for young people not voting, and that's fine. But don't voluntarily give up your vote then complain that your voice was ignored and no one takes your demographic seriously.
    To make an informed vote, it takes up more than just the few minutes it takes to actually cast a vote.

    How about the young did not vote because they felt that they were ignored unlike say in the Scottish referendum, as opposed to it being the other way around. To be fair, going by this thread, they have a right to complain that they aren't taken seriously, given that there probably reasons why they didn't vote.

    (Original post by The Roast)
    Well if 80% of 18-24 bothered showing up, the result would have been different.

    Of course you can blame the 64% of 18-24 year who didn't take 5 minutes of their time to go to a polling station before 10pm. It's downright laziness and complacency.

    And then to blame 65 and overs for "screwing the young generation over"?!

    65 and overs had a 80%+ turn out.

    No excuses.
    Not necessarily, but that was the point, they didn't turn up for their own reasons so you can't change that. Tbh I was surprised that many remainers from any age group showed up given how they were polling just a week before. If it was really just that 5 mins involved, then that would be some damn laziness (which it wasn't).
    The young remainers would obviously blame the demographic that completely opposed them for what they think would happen, it's a pointless argument from both sides.

    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    And they have the nerve to blame older generations for ruining their futures? Such naivite, as expected. They destroyed their own future by being too lazy
    :ahhhhh: The 'lazy' ones would not be the ones who are saying that.

    (Original post by Legendary Quest)
    Don't blame the older generation for the failures of the younger generations.



    Yeah, that is the problem
    Are you sure? I didn't see one confident person on the remain side through the whole campaign till the Yougov poll came out after voting closed.


    (Original post by Jee1)
    Ohhhhhh they'd rather spend time on Facebook or Instagram what utter thickos.
    They bother to vote on Xfactor finals but not something that will impact their future IDIOTs
    Considering it is the young remainers doing the complaining, but it was the leavers who were winning online, I think that is a ignorant comment. If you bothered to check out the demographics of the X factor audience, I think you'll find it is evenly split throughout all ages.

    Source: Rzt (Digital Spy Ratings Thread - 2011)
    http://i55.tinypic.com/11vk3mo.jpg
    Given the younger generation has decreased television consumption, I would predict the above to have decreased for them, not that it has anything to do with voting; it's mainly women who watch the show, and men who go watch football. I'd really like to use some of your adjectives to describe the people on this thread.

    (Original post by Chakede)
    to put into perspective 10 million + morons voted ( and paid) for the last X factor final. many of these imagine are currently posting on facebook to their 'bae's and bruvs that its a shame they not in eu anymore.


    I should really stop feeding the trolls, but I think too many people actually hold such opinions.
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    (Original post by Chakede)
    :facepalm:
    :rofl:
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    (Original post by RVNmax)
    X
    Regardless of reasons, if you do not vote, especially on such a monumental decision such as this, you have no right to complain. If they wanted to earn that right, they should've voted.

    People who voted for their futures are not lazy-how can they be? They made the choice and exercised their democratic right. Lazy people don't care enough to do such things
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    (Original post by RVNmax)



    To make an informed vote, it takes up more than just the few minutes it takes to actually cast a vote.

    How about the young did not vote because they felt that they were ignored unlike say in the Scottish referendum, as opposed to it being the other way around. To be fair, going by this thread, they have a right to complain that they aren't taken seriously, given that there probably reasons why they didn't vote.

    .
    Again, it's not that hard to get informed. However, given the leave victory it's clear than the informed do vote, so I don't accept your argument that the ~60% of young people didn't vote because they "weren't informed enough".

    The young are ignored because they don't vote. You can argue they don't vote because they are ignored, but we're the ones who ultimately have the power to change that. You see 90%+ young person voter turnout and I guarantee the politicians will be all over young voters next general election.

    Incidentally, some of the best and high quality debates were between the 16-17 year olds in the Scottish referendum.
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    Good, we didn't screw up our future too badly then
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    how is this new news ?
    young people just dont vote enough. I know this first hand and so would most young people. I had maybe 50%/60% of my friends/young people i know register to vote and some don't even go and vote, though this could be due to our last exams being that day , as well as many events and people enjoying themselves, thought me and a friend walked into the polling station off our heads to vote, so theres no excuse .

    Some don't vote, some don't care about voting, some just dont know enough of the world or policies to vote/ card to vote.I've know someone who has worked since she was 16, going to uni, got some great A-levels/GCSE but she honestly has no idea whats going on in the world or even england, so she doesnt bother to vote, since she feels like she doesnt know enough to vote , ''correctly''.

    lastly some people , expect the best side/their side to win, since it makes sense so dont turn up to vote. register. I didn't vote on london mayoral election since i knew khan was going to win, goldsmith was a ****ing joke . Also that would have been the first time i voted, and i didnt register in time ... or care to before the deadline, since i had other more stressful things to worry about.

    overall young people not voting is nothing new. The old always win on votes, thats why parties cater to them, pensions and gas grants ect ect, since the old will turn up to vote. The young are over looked since they dont vote, and since they dont they arent catered to and since they arent catered to they dont vote, endless cycle of retardedness really. even if a party caters to young people, they still dont turn up to vote.
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Regardless of reasons, if you do not vote, especially on such a monumental decision such as this, you have no right to complain. If they wanted to earn that right, they should've voted.

    People who voted for their futures are not lazy-how can they be? They made the choice and exercised their democratic right. Lazy people don't care enough to do such things
    "On such monumental* decisions such as this" I think it is abusing your power to vote on insufficient knowledge and misinformation out there. The electorate have as much right to not vote as vote. They have the right to complain if it unfeasible to make an uninformed decision or that none of the options were gave them what they wanted (totally feasible due the uncertainty of what on earth leaving the EU actually means). Unless you are counting 'spoiling the ballot' as voting. Nobody has to earn a right! Of course, in reference to complaining about being screwed over, it would be those who actually voted who are saying that.

    I think you misunderstood what I was saying. You used the term lazy to represent those that didn't vote. I am saying those that didn't vote are not the ones who are complaining about the older generation anyway so it's a pointless argument.
    *= from what I've taken in, the pros and cons balance each other out, I doubt this will have much affect on anything apart from politics tbh.

    (Original post by Elivercury)
    Again, it's not that hard to get informed. However, given the leave victory it's clear than the informed do vote, so I don't accept your argument that the ~60% of young people didn't vote because they "weren't informed enough".

    The young are ignored because they don't vote. You can argue they don't vote because they are ignored, but we're the ones who ultimately have the power to change that. You see 90%+ young person voter turnout and I guarantee the politicians will be all over young voters next general election.

    Incidentally, some of the best and high quality debates were between the 16-17 year olds in the Scottish referendum.
    Considering economists and politicians get paid well for a full-time job I'd say it is quite hard. Why does a leave victory mean the informed vote? (I may just be slow at this time of night so please explain) Well I don't believe I said that, I acknowledged other reasons in that post itself and know that there are probably more out there.

    Well that is just possibility I suggested. We don't know either way, but I mentioned the Scottish referendum as being one of high youth turnout because the politicians appealed to them, so I don't see how you can then think it's probably the younger generations fault this time as opposed to the politicians. By making uninformed decisions I do have the power to change that, but in the end everyone I know was having a punt so I don't blame anyone for not bothering. Though, in a general election I would agree that to show that you have a political interest, if these statistics are actually collected+, you could spoil the ballot at least, but let's be honest it is kind of pointless.

    + Those aren't the actual statistics for this referendum, but apparently some prediction, which going by what the twitter link says is based on the General Election in 2015 or something, so who knows how many of our youth actually turned up!
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Regardless of reasons, if you do not vote, especially on such a monumental decision such as this, you have no right to complain. If they wanted to earn that right, they should've voted.

    People who voted for their futures are not lazy-how can they be? They made the choice and exercised their democratic right. Lazy people don't care enough to do such things
    Because for some or most, going to Glastonbury or creating hilarious(?) memes was more important than protecting their future. But if thats the case, haven't these people heard of a Postal Vote?

    Answer? Probably not.
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    (Original post by RVNmax)
    Considering economists and politicians get paid well for a full-time job I'd say it is quite hard. Why does a leave victory mean the informed vote? (I may just be slow at this time of night so please explain) Well I don't believe I said that, I acknowledged other reasons in that post itself and know that there are probably more out there.

    Well that is just possibility I suggested. We don't know either way, but I mentioned the Scottish referendum as being one of high youth turnout because the politicians appealed to them, so I don't see how you can then think it's probably the younger generations fault this time as opposed to the politicians. By making uninformed decisions I do have the power to change that, but in the end everyone I know was having a punt so I don't blame anyone for not bothering. Though, in a general election I would agree that to show that you have a political interest, if these statistics are actually collected+, you could spoil the ballot at least, but let's be honest it is kind of pointless.
    They do get paid full time to be knowledgeable and they then boil it down so the average joe can understand it so we're informed when we vote. I mistyped with my previous commend, I meant to say the victory clearly means the uninformed vote, not the informed.

    Ultimately if you are suggesting that only the top economists be the ones to vote (the ones who have a strong vested interest in the markets I might add), then we would only have a tiny proportion of the country voting and we wouldn't be a democracy. The reason the average voter gets to vote is so that they can vote on issues that affect them, rather than a government elected from the elite, by the elite and working to benefit the elite.

    I agree that the independence referendum was very different in that it appealed to the younger generation, but ultimately they did so because youngsters were more likely to vote leave. As it stands, given the low voting turnout, there is fairly little incentive for parties to target the youth vote as it rarely amounts to much. Ultimately that is our fault. A single election where the youth vote carried a significant proportion/margin and I guarantee you that politicians would be taking notice next time.

    And as you say, even if you don't like any of the options - spoil the ballot. Sure, it's pointless with 0.2% ballots are spoiled, however if 10%+ are, then it sends a pretty strong message of "you could have this 10% if you appealed to us".
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    (Original post by The Roast)
    Fullofsurprises JordanL tanyapotter :lol: 36% looooool
    Go to the Preston QT that you talked about, with a brutal question for what ever pathetic remainer they have in the studio.
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    They have the cheek to say old people shouldnt have voted. How about the young realised their friends who didnt vote are losers and suck up the result?
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    This is why all the complaining about the old ruining the futures of the young who "overwhelmingly wanted to stay" is kinda dumb. Obviously most young people didn't care enough to vote, and only about a quarter of the 18-24 population made the choice to vote Remain.

    These people will grow up, and their political views will change. Most young people voting in the 1970s referendum voted to remain as well, but they grew up, and the majority now voted to leave.
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    God sake I really do try and give young people credit sometimes (esp 16-17 year olds who seem to be treated like 3 year olds when it comes to voting) but this is just so irritating for **** sake how can they be that apathetic about THIS of all things.
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    (Original post by Elivercury)
    They do get paid full time to be knowledgeable and they then boil it down so the average joe can understand it so we're informed when we vote. I mistyped with my previous commend, I meant to say the victory clearly means the uninformed vote, not the informed.

    Ultimately if you are suggesting that only the top economists be the ones to vote (the ones who have a strong vested interest in the markets I might add), then we would only have a tiny proportion of the country voting and we wouldn't be a democracy. The reason the average voter gets to vote is so that they can vote on issues that affect them, rather than a government elected from the elite, by the elite and working to benefit the elite.

    I agree that the independence referendum was very different in that it appealed to the younger generation, but ultimately they did so because youngsters were more likely to vote leave. As it stands, given the low voting turnout, there is fairly little incentive for parties to target the youth vote as it rarely amounts to much. Ultimately that is our fault. A single election where the youth vote carried a significant proportion/margin and I guarantee you that politicians would be taking notice next time.

    And as you say, even if you don't like any of the options - spoil the ballot. Sure, it's pointless with 0.2% ballots are spoiled, however if 10%+ are, then it sends a pretty strong message of "you could have this 10% if you appealed to us".
    Oh yes that is what I am saying as well. But when I say "the victory clearly means the uninformed vote, not the informed," that is to say the informed are knowledgeable that they can't honestly make a proper call on this, i.e. informed that they are uninformed.

    I'm not suggesting a lack of democracy, but I'm also saying that asking people to go and randomly flip a coin is also not a solution. Hence, I don't have a solution, though as I mentioned previously, the best advice I have is people to go and spoil the ballot.

    I still don't understand your point in the third para; if youngsters are more likely to vote for a side as the majority are assuming on here, then it is also the politicians fault for not appealing to them. You make the claim that they did so in the Scottish referendum, but imply that they were excused from that in this one?

    I agree with your conclusion as a solution to force the youth to be taken seriously, but let's be honest, it's not going to happen until someone mainstream at the very least mentions such a position. In the meantime, it doesn't excuse people for discounting the opinions of the youth, just as it is not right to discount the opinions of the older generation.
 
 
 
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