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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    FTSE 250 on the other hand certainly is brexit though.

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    I dunno about that.

    Between you and me we don't need to get the remain camp involved because there info isn't worth any stock market positions.

    My concern would be that we are seeing a similar glimpse of the QE Bubble popping.

    Let me explain.

    In Dec 2015 Janet Yellen increased interest rates in the USA. This caused a huge market shock and Stocks plummeted.You can see this trend on both the Dow Jones, FTSE250 and FTSE100 from Dec 2015 to Feb/March 2015.

    Now Janet Yellens interest rate rise was proof that the Federal Reserve cannot increase rates since it means the QE bubble will face diminishing returns and in turn American stocks will follow base currency.

    What we need to learn from the Brexit is investors where speculating on a remain majority. They went ahead and buy loads of blue-chip stocks just like the FTSE100 and Dow Jones. Now that the result has gone the other way they are selling it off like crazy and its causing momentum.

    We also need to factor in why has the FTSE100 done better than the FTSE250? Its because of Bank of England QE. The top stocks get propped up by this stimulus.

    I know its not what the leave camp want to hear but its a contributing factor why the FTSE100 has been more resilient.

    Now ignore any come back from the Remain camp on this because they don't know what their talking about. If they endorse me I will laugh at them.


    For the moment though we need to focus on the FTSE250 and ignore the FTSE100. One is inflated and the other is a clear indicator. I think after all the poltical instability the FTSE250 will recover but going by the FTSE100 will lead you to loose a lot of money because we don't know the potency level of the QE vs the Stocks.
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    Name:  ftse250.png
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    I reckon FTSE250 is undervalued at the moment. It should go back up to 16000 points.
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    (Original post by WhisperingTide)
    Here's the thing, your opinion is just as worthless as everybody else's. Nobody has any incentive to care what you would rather have.
    Is it not odd how all the people who actually understand anything about these things are saying "shut up, this is not a big deal?"

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    (Original post by illegaltobepoor)
    Name:  ftse250.png
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    I reckon FTSE250 is undervalued at the moment. It should go back up to 16000 points.
    It will when the Government gets it's act together.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Meh, borrowing rates are still incredibly low and the raring cut actually has coincided with the rate dropping a bit further. It really isn't the big deal the media want to make it out to be, most advanced economies are AA or lower and doing fine

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    Then why did Osborne construct the whole of his first two years of austerity around the goal of not losing Britain's AAA credit rating?

    (He did lose it, of course: that's what fiscal contractionist policies do.)

    It's almost like Tories will make up any old rubbish as a reason to implement policies which hurt normal working people (although I'm not sure why we're not allowed to care about non-working people).
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    (Original post by illegaltobepoor)
    I dunno about that.

    For the moment though we need to focus on the FTSE250 and ignore the FTSE100. One is inflated and the other is a clear indicator. I think after all the poltical instability the FTSE250 will recover but going by the FTSE100 will lead you to loose a lot of money because we don't know the potency level of the QE vs the Stocks.
    Don't think it has anything to do with that.

    The FTSE 250 earn about 50% of their earning from the UK. The FTSE 100 earn about of 20% of their earnings from the UK.

    So obviously, the 250 will do worse than the 100 in the current climate.

    Like I said on Friday/Sat. As long as political uncertainty continues then that will transmit onto the Stock and currency markets.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Then why did Osborne construct the whole of his first two years of austerity around the goal of not losing Britain's AAA credit rating?

    (He did lose it, of course: that's what fiscal contractionist policies do.)

    It's almost like Tories will make up any old rubbish as a reason to implement policies which hurt normal working people (although I'm not sure why we're not allowed to care about non-working people).
    Because he knows all you idiots think it's makes a huge difference whether its AA or AAA, as you are all proving right now

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Because he knows all you idiots think it's makes a huge difference whether its AA or AAA, as you are all proving right now

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    I know it doesn't make much of a difference, which is one reason why I thought Osborne's austerity was moronic, harmful and unnecessary. Thing is I bet you were banging on about it back then with the best of them, or right-wingers in general certainly were. It's the lies and hypocrisy that get me, and the Tories never get called out in the media for it like Labour used to.
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    (Original post by illegaltobepoor)
    Its like the FTSE100. The Remain camp claim its going down due to the Brexit yet they have no idea its been going down since April 2015.
    According to Yahoo Finance it first fell from its peak in the week commencing 30 May 2015.

    The EU Referendum Bill was introduced on 28 May 2015.

    If there is a link between the two then we are forced to conclude that the FTSE 100 have been petrified of the mere idea that the UK might leave the EU ever since it was first put to the House of Commons.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    According to Yahoo Finance it first fell from its peak in the week commencing 30 May 2015.

    The EU Referendum Bill was introduced on 28 May 2015.

    If there is a link between the two then we are forced to conclude that the FTSE 100 have been petrified of the mere idea that the UK might leave the EU ever since it was first put to the House of Commons.
    Odd given it peaked in April, over a month before the bill was introduced, let alone passed.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/UKX:IND
    http://www.tradingeconomics.com/unit...m/stock-market
    http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/i...h-FTSE-10.html

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    It was at broadly the same level from the week of 6 April to 25 May 2015. It is very disingenuous of you looking at the shape of the graph to quibble.

    7089.80 in the week of 6 April.
    6984.40 in the week of 25 May.
    After that it fell week on week to the end of June before sticking at around 6600.
    After that it fell to 6100 at the end of August.
    It rallied to a high of 6400 by October at a low point for the Leave vote.
    It then fell as low as 5700 in February 2016.
    It is now at 5900.

    As I'm too lazy to post a picture, anyone interested should simply look at the Bloomberg link you have posted to see how disingenuous your point is.
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    (Original post by NerradCFCB)
    We can retaliate by going to war with them Us and America would **** europe up really easy france are flouncers so are the Italians the only country which would put up a fight would be russia. How can they punish the finance sector?
    This does not seem like a good idea :/
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    According to Yahoo Finance it first fell from its peak in the week commencing 30 May 2015.

    The EU Referendum Bill was introduced on 28 May 2015.

    If there is a link between the two then we are forced to conclude that the FTSE 100 have been petrified of the mere idea that the UK might leave the EU ever since it was first put to the House of Commons.
    You can also see a fairly significant drop in the pound/dollar after Cameron announced the EU date in Feb 2016.

    In fact, I think that was the lowest pound/dollar value prior to Brexit.
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    You can also see fairly significant drops int the pound/dollar after Cameron announced the EU date and when the bill was passed.

    In fact, I think that was the lowest pound/dollar value prior to Brexit.
    Good work! They really have ruined us.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Good work! They really have ruined us.
    In any context other than Brexit and most of the lefties and students on TSR would be getting excited over a fall in sterling, harping on about it making exports cheaper and talking about how it will help heavy industry which they love so much blah blah rebalancing the economy blah blah evil Thatcher blah blah.
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    (Original post by pol pot noodles)
    In any context other than Brexit and most of the lefties and students on TSR would be getting excited over a fall in sterling, harping on about it making exports cheaper and talking about how it will help heavy industry which they love so much blah blah rebalancing the economy blah blah evil Thatcher blah blah.
    There is no going back to industry (although we do still make a fair bit of stuff, which is now at great risk) and if there was it's not something we can cure overnight in a spasm of jingoistic fervour.

    It's true that a fall in sterling makes exports cheaper, but unfortunately our exports are mainly things that are really easy to set up somewhere else. Any idiot can set up a business in financial services, it's a bit harder to magic up a mining industry out of thin air.

    I don't particularly mind whether the pound rises or falls and normal people, who have no overseas investments, probably shouldn't either. But it is certainly an indication that the markets lack confidence in a UK that is outside the EU.

    Our mini investigation in this thread looking back at the run-up to the referendum has revealed that the markets are probably not reacting only to the political instability and lack of steer given by the Leave camp on what they are actually going to do. They are reacting to the prospect, and now actuality, of the UK having left the EU per se.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    According to Yahoo Finance it first fell from its peak in the week commencing 30 May 2015.

    The EU Referendum Bill was introduced on 28 May 2015.

    If there is a link between the two then we are forced to conclude that the FTSE 100 have been petrified of the mere idea that the UK might leave the EU ever since it was first put to the House of Commons.
    Its also round about the same time janet yellen declared she was going to increase interest rates.
 
 
 
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