Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    It's a good idea to stay at home. Why add un-necessary expenses when you're already to be drowning in debt. Think logically
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    How did you all get over the having to live close to uni rule (within 31 miles if full time student...) ?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Twinkletoes00)
    How did you all get over the having to live close to uni rule (within 31 miles if full time student...) ?
    Living in student halls and in private housing near to uni. It's very easy.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I would say move. It depends on the person but I have done both: lived out for a year and home for a year. And holy **** the difference is insane. Pretty much all of my best memories are from halls, yeah you can make friends in other ways but the spontaneous element really makes the experience. Plus, even if you hate it the whole of first year only really adds up to like 7 months in halls and you always have the option of just moving home from there on.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Live in Nottingham and my uni is in Nottingham. Commuting was no problem for me (45min). I had no problems engaging with uni life either 😁
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by marco14196)
    It's a good idea to stay at home. Why add un-necessary expenses when you're already to be drowning in debt. Think logically
    Everyone is going to leave uni with debt, a couple extra grand doesn't really mean much
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by marco14196)
    It's a good idea to stay at home. Why add un-necessary expenses when you're already to be drowning in debt. Think logically
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Everyone is going to leave uni with debt, a couple extra grand doesn't really mean much
    It's not true debt anyway. Your home won't be repossessed and you can't be declared bankrupt if you don't repay your student loan in full, unlike proper loans. Also, your student loan gets written off after 30 years, unlike proper loans.

    It's more of a graduate tax, which you only pay on the proportion of your salary over £21k. If you earn less than £21k per annum, you stop paying*
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    It's not true debt anyway. Your home won't be repossessed and you can't be declared bankrupt if you don't repay your student loan in full, unlike proper loans. Also, your student loan gets written off after 30 years, unlike proper loans.

    It's more of a graduate tax, which you only pay on the proportion of your salary over £21k. If you earn less than £21k per annum, you stop paying*
    Yeah exactly. I wouldn't refrain from living at uni just because of that alone.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Yeah exactly. I wouldn't refrain from living at uni just because of that alone.
    If people were so worried about the tax, they wouldn't go to uni in the first place, that's how I see it.

    The social side of uni is just as important as the academic, in my opinion, and the social side is so much easier if you're living at uni
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    It's not true debt anyway. Your home won't be repossessed and you can't be declared bankrupt if you don't repay your student loan in full, unlike proper loans. Also, your student loan gets written off after 30 years, unlike proper loans.

    It's more of a graduate tax, which you only pay on the proportion of your salary over £21k. If you earn less than £21k per annum, you stop paying*
    Never refer to that as not "true debt", that is incredibly naive, especially in light of the government revealing they can retroactively alter the terms. Its still a real debt nonetheless. The system is a steo away from going US style
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Everyone is going to leave uni with debt, a couple extra grand doesn't really mean much
    Quite literally speaks volumes about the poor attitudes students have towards finances. One of many reasons half of them end up in a rut. Debt is bad. That is an absolute. You shouldnt encourage someone to take more on just to benefit his social life. What next, tell him to go into his overdraft to pay for rounds in a bar.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by flowerlu)
    I have always been a 'home bird'-I like to stay close to home with my parents/dogs/siblings etc, so I am considering living at home during Uni. The primary reason is that I have a feeling I'll be really, really homesick if I lived in halls. So I was wondering if any of you guys commute? If so, could you tell me what it's like-do you have lots of friends/do you regret it/what are the pros and cons? Thank you!
    No it's not a bad idea, living at home during uni, as long as you are going to uni of your choice has many benefits. For example, travelling, accommodation, food, and life in general is easier, because you can focus on your studies rather than struggling with other aspects. However, living away from home can be good because it helps you to become independent and wary of well reality and life these days. Living at home is also good because you have all the facilities you would have normally, eg. shops, banks, restaurants and all of those things, but living away would mean you would need to familiarise yourself with all those things.
    & Living home means you won't miss your family and friends!
    Choice is yours, my friend.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    Universities tend to offer first-year students guaranteed accommodation in halls; I think you should take advantage of it and see how you feel. You need to remember that everyone will be in the same boat when they move in and you can always move back home if you really don't like it. There is a lot to learn about being independent!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by marco14196)
    Quite literally speaks volumes about the poor attitudes students have towards finances. One of many reasons half of them end up in a rut. Debt is bad. That is an absolute. You shouldnt encourage someone to take more on just to benefit his social life. What next, tell him to go into his overdraft to pay for rounds in a bar.
    A huge part of university is the independence gained from living away from home, it's not just about social life. I would encourage everyone to live away if they can, you gain so many skills just from that alone. It's not comparable to living at home, especially if you don't have to. The extra debt is nothing in comparison to what is gained and if you don't want any debt at all, don't go to uni.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by marco14196)
    Never refer to that as not "true debt", that is incredibly naive, especially in light of the government revealing they can retroactively alter the terms. Its still a real debt nonetheless. The system is a steo away from going US style
    You will still never be declared bankrupt or have your possessions repossessed due to not paying back your student loan. Therefore it will never be true debt.

    (Original post by marco14196)
    Quite literally speaks volumes about the poor attitudes students have towards finances. One of many reasons half of them end up in a rut. Debt is bad. That is an absolute. You shouldnt encourage someone to take more on just to benefit his social life. What next, tell him to go into his overdraft to pay for rounds in a bar.
    The vast majority of people are forced into their overdraft to just pay for accommodation, not because they're reckless.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by flowerlu)
    I have always been a 'home bird'-I like to stay close to home with my parents/dogs/siblings etc, so I am considering living at home during Uni. The primary reason is that I have a feeling I'll be really, really homesick if I lived in halls. So I was wondering if any of you guys commute? If so, could you tell me what it's like-do you have lots of friends/do you regret it/what are the pros and cons? Thank you!
    I lived at home for my 1st and 2nd year and 100% do not regret a thing. I lived a 30 minute commute from uni so didn't spend that much on transport. I was a bit wary of the whole missing out on the social aspect part so I thought i'd make a bit of an effort. I went out for fresher's and joined a sports and course based society from which I met lots of friends. Tbh the main focus of me going to uni was to get a 1st in my degree so I came straight out with a job, it wouldn't have been the end of the world if it lacked the social aspect.

    The course I did was focused on group projects so I had to get to know people on my course which was also a big help. You can still do the whole learning to cook/budgeting thing from home, you don't need to move out to do that. During my 2 years at home I also worked part time so ended up with a good amount of savings which I could spend on holidays etc. I eventually moved in with my boyfriend for my industrial placement which was good as I was getting paid a decent amount to pay for rent and bills but now i'm faced with the prospect of budgeting every last £1 to get by in my third year.

    Overall, it's up to what you want to get out of uni really. Whilst at home I got to see my family and friends on regular basis, work part time and contribute to my savings and also get involved in societies at uni. Being at home won't hold you back - Good Luck!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Living at home during Uni is the easy choice if you will but I think leaving home is a major part of University life, and being independent.

    Take that with a grain of salt, considering I dont even have the option to live at home during Uni, nor has my course started yet.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    A huge part of university is the independence gained from living away from home, it's not just about social life. I would encourage everyone to live away if they can, you gain so many skills just from that alone. It's not comparable to living at home, especially if you don't have to. The extra debt is nothing in comparison to what is gained and if you don't want any debt at all, don't go to uni.
    I'm quite tired of this proposition that university life is any different to real life. Living in ghetto squattings, struggling with money and eating poor food. There is nothing special about university.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by marco14196)
    I'm quite tired of this proposition that university life is any different to real life. Living in ghetto squattings, struggling with money and eating poor food. There is nothing special about university.
    Some people struggle with money which is why they need student finance.

    Ghetto squattings and eating food are the biggest lies I've ever heard-I live in better, more affordable accommodation and eat far better food than had I not moved out. The whole idea that students live off nothing but baked beans and toast is the biggest farce in existence*
    • TSR Support Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Study Helper
    I had a friends who commuted to uni cause she lived with her boyfriend in a house.

    She became friends as we had our own group on Fb before we met and it was generally the same for the first year. However, because people like me who lived in halls made friends we'd invite other people in the group and she was welcome but because she never met any of our other friends she always felt out of place and would say no. And she was a quite confident person.

    But I think if you can make a subject group of fb (it doesn't always work) but it might. It makes it easier. But she did regret working all the time and not going out or she'd often say no cause she couldn't be bothered to stay or she didn't want ask to stay at someone's flat. So if you don't have that bond with someone you'll always feel like you're in the way.

    I personally think you'll be at a disadvantage. It's not a bad idea, but I personally dont' see the point of not going to uni and being in halls. Fair enough if you life in the same city, you could save a ton. But personally, I'd want the experience and not feel like I'm missing out. Halls is DEFO full of drama, no matter where you hide, but - the experiences like them will curve your uni experience for the worse or best, you just take it. Life isn't all sweet and dandy. And uni is one of th ebest times to experience your low falls and high jumps. Cause I couldn't imagine being 21+ in a graduate job and you don't know how to react to a face to face argument at work because you've never had to experience conflict cause you didn't stay at halls.

    Now I'm not saying halls is where you'll figure out lfies problems, but halls is one the best places to be on how to act and be a responsible adult. You will learn a lot of life tips whilst being at uni halls.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brexit voters: Do you stand by your vote?
    Find out more

    Accommodation profiles:

    Downing Students

    Universal Student Living

    “Over 25 years of perfecting the student accommodation experience. Downing Students. Accommodation Made for you”


    Prodigy Living

    Prodigy Living

    Accommodation in 15 cities across the UK, with 24 sites providing modern, stylish en suite and studio rooms close to the major universities.


    iQ Student Accommodation

    iQ Student Accommodation

    Great value student rooms in city centre locations all across the UK


    X1 Lettings

    X1 Lettings

    Luxury student accommodation in Liverpool & Manchester.


    Collegiate Accommodation

    Collegiate Accommodation

    "This is student living. Just better."


    Scape Student Living

    Study Inn

    Providing stunning high quality, boutique student accommodation throughout the UK


    The Student Housing Company

    The Student Housing Company

    Award-winning student accommodation across the UK.


    Articles:

    Student accommodation articles What to take to uniDo I need a TV licence?

    Quick link:

    Unanswered student accommodation threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.