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Looking more and more likely that the vote will be ignored. How would Brexit react? watch

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    (Original post by Doctor_Einstein)
    For the greater good in the EU, democracy can be ignored.
    You should definitely emigrate. China might suit you better, or North Korea.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You should definitely emigrate. China might suit you better, or North Korea.
    The EU is suitable enough
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I suggest you emigrate. The euro will never work for the UK, where the economy is significantly out of step with the rest of the EU, and always has been. The current level of migration will probably result in you joining those unable to find an affordable home once you graduate.
    I agree. I buy a new home 2 years ago. Cost me 60k and its now worth 100k.
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    (Original post by Doctor_Einstein)
    It can be ignored, because the EU ultimately isn't a democratic superstate. For the greater good in the EU, democracy can be ignored.
    Yeah it can be ignored, but it doesn't mean it should be ignored.

    It's what the majority of this country voted for. As much as I agree with the sentiment that the EU isn't this evil institution that people like Farage seem to think it is, this entire referendum would have been a farce if you choose to ignore it.
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    (Original post by James.Carnell)
    I think that they are biding their time so that fear grips the country and they will just say "Oh its for the best because we know better".

    Alternatively they may just allow free movement on the sly.

    Are you sure this is really crazy ? You are very trusting of politicians.
    I agree with your points. I feel with the way things are going that Boris or May are unlikely to invoke Article 50. I don't see why not however as the result of the referendum is very clear, the majority voted to leave the referendum.

    I despise Boris because I think he's so full of bs. He has no plans to leave the EU, I think his support for Leave was mainly a political thing. A few of the nonsense he has been spouting this week.. 'The UK will retain access to the single market with full control of immigration'.. 'British citizens will still be able to live and work and buy homes anywhere in Europe'.. He is either a very delusional man or he's playing the public.

    I think it's likely that the EU will enforce the results of the referendum regardless of what Boris and the rest of his cohorts want. The EU have stated quite clearly that they refuse to do any informal talks or start negotiations without the triggering of Article 50 and that the UK cannot retain access to the single market without reciprocal free flow of people and capital. In the end, it's likely that if Boris leads the negotiations, the UK will end up with a Norway EEA deal which will completely defeat the point of the referendum. The UK will still take rules from the EU, but have no influencing power whilst still paying into the EU budget.

    We've voted to leave so we need to start making that happen so we can all bloody move on. I voted to Remain but if the vote is ignored, I will be p***ed off. What a waste of everyone's time. Why open the vote up to the public if you're just going to ignore their wishes?

    (sorry for the rant)
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    There will be no repeat vote. Britain will exit, but triggering article 50 should not be until we have our own negotiating ducks in a row.

    Any attempt to subvert the vote, or to exit without controlling migration, will result in a bloodbath at the next election, with Tory, Labour and LibDem MPs being ousted across the board.
    So... The EU should sit around twiddling their thumbs waiting for the UK to get 'its negotiating ducks in a row'? The public has voted to Leave, they need to trigger Article 50 and get on with it.
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    (Original post by illegaltobepoor)
    I agree. I buy a new home 2 years ago. Cost me 60k and its now worth 100k.
    It never ceases to amaze me that so many young people espouse the merits of uncontrolled migration when the people it hurts most are themselves. We really need a housing market that broadly keeps pace with general inflation, but we have one that has an inbuilt propensity to rise far more because of the constant rise in population, and that was true even before Blair decided we needed to import half of eastern Europe. Net immigration has been 500,000 a year for a decade now, hence the rise in value of your home.
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    (Original post by Delilah234)
    So... The EU should sit around twiddling their thumbs waiting for the UK to get 'its negotiating ducks in a row'? The public has voted to Leave, they need to trigger Article 50 and get on with it.
    Yes. It has no choice (and Merkel has said so), and we certainly should not disadvantage ourselves by striking before the iron is even in the fire.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    It never ceases to amaze me that so many young people espouse the merits of uncontrolled migration when the people it hurts most are themselves. We really need a housing market that broadly keeps pace with general inflation, but we have one that has an inbuilt propensity to rise far more because of the constant rise in population, and that was true even before Blair decided we needed to import half of eastern Europe. Net immigration has been 500,000 a year for a decade now, hence the rise in value of your home.
    I agree. I don't mean to be prejudice against age but people need to face the reality that when business has a monopoly over the supply of abundant labor it is the worker who suffers.

    Yes closing borders is a protectionist policy and it is harmful towards enterprise but at the moment the resources to live are too expensive for the average worker.

    Folks need to realise that the Victorian Terrace 3 bed houses across England where only meant to house 2 parents and 3 children max! Now there is rampant overcrowding to the point where nearly every single house in working class areas is full of mold!

    I get it that the majority of people don't give a crap about the working class but if you want the working classes votes you need to start appealing to them and I am afraid Remain in the EU didn't appeal to them.

    Yet in East London and Essex there was a bigger turn out for Leave voters! I wonder why!
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Yes. It has no choice (and Merkel has said so), and we certainly should not disadvantage ourselves by striking before the iron is even in the fire.
    That's exactly what the EU wants. They want the negotiations over and done with as soon as possible. It is not in their interest to wait around for the UK to get its act together and start trudging to the metaphorical divorce settlement table. The UK can not, after voting to leave, waste everyone's time by dragging its feet about leaving. It just will not work and the EU will see right through that stunt. So the fact that David Cameron quit immediately after the vote results in a bid to buy some time was a cute little manoeuvre but for him to think that he can wait 3 or 4 months before triggering Article 50 is complete nonsense. Anyways, no point speculating what the fools in power will and won't do, I'm sure we will find out soon enough.
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    (Original post by Delilah234)
    It is not in their interest to wait around for the UK to get its act together and start trudging to the metaphorical divorce settlement table.
    You used the metaphor, so let's carry on. If you leave your husband you don't instantly appoint a lawyer and rush to court that week. You gather the evidence, consider your own best interests, decide which assets you want, how the house might be sold to everyone's benefit, take time to find a lawyer, and then act.

    In this case, we need to have a negotiating team in place, briefed and prepared, before we act. That must wait until we have a new PM. If we act now the clock will be ticking for several months while we do the things we should have done before triggering article 50.

    Surely that is obvious?
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    (Original post by TheNoseDiver)
    Civil War
    Exciting
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You used the metaphor, so let's carry on. If you leave your husband you don't instantly appoint a lawyer and rush to court that week. You gather the evidence, consider your own best interests, decide which assets you want, how the house might be sold to everyone's benefit, take time to find a lawyer, and then act.

    In this case, we need to have a negotiating team in place, briefed and prepared, before we act. That must wait until we have a new PM. If we act now the clock will be ticking for several months while we do the things we should have done before triggering article 50.

    Surely that is obvious?
    Not really.. You're looking at it the other way around. Before I leave my husband, wouldn't I have already researched a good lawyer and have a general working knowledge of how the divorce proceedings will happen? I know that this is what I will do. You might not rush to court that week, but by the time you leave you will already have a working knowledge of what the next steps are. Are you trying to tell me that no one in government planned for the Brexit possibility as the result of the referendum? Why didn't they already have a team in place?

    My point is that, it seems to me that Dave wants to play a game. Honestly resign right after the results are declared? He simply could not negotiate our exit first then leave. We should have done this a long time ago. It boggles the mind why the government would not have a second plan in place in case the outcome was against the one they wanted. I mean that is the logical step. I think they're trying to drag this out for as long as they can which is only going to tick off the EU.
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    Exciting
    Remove gun laws please???

    OP, even if we leave the EU, so many things will stay the same / very similar that people who voted leave will have basically be ignored anyway because the changes they sought through leaving will not occur
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    (Original post by Kieran1996)
    Remove gun laws please???

    OP, even if we leave the EU, so many things will stay the same / very similar that people who voted leave will have basically be ignored anyway because the changes they sought through leaving will not occur
    I agree, I think it'll be only in principle that we've left the EU. Especially considering the case for the single market access. That is going to keep things very much the same.
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    (Original post by Delilah234)
    Before I leave my husband, wouldn't I have already researched a good lawyer and have a general working knowledge of how the divorce proceedings will happen?
    That is simply not how it works. In real life, the relationship ends, people part, they mourn its loss, perhaps try to repair it, and then, maybe months later decide on divorce.

    In this case, we do not even have a negotiating team in place yet. Why do you think we should spike our own guns by conforming to Junckers' demands to move forward at a pace that disadvantages us?
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    (Original post by Delilah234)
    I agree, I think it'll be only in principle that we've left the EU. Especially considering the case for the single market access. That is going to keep things very much the same.
    All we've basically done it taken the decision making from ***** in the EU, Brussesls to the ***** in Parliament, London
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    Do you have any idea how politics works?
    It's too soon after the referendum, things are pretty chaotic right now.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    That is simply not how it works. In real life, the relationship ends, people part, they mourn its loss, perhaps try to repair it, and then, maybe months later decide on divorce.

    In this case, we do not even have a negotiating team in place yet. Why do you thing we should spike our own guns by conforming to Junckers' demands to move forward at a pace that disadvantages us?
    Maybe not for you but honestly if you're dead set on ending a relationship, I'm very sure that you will research your exit plans well ahead of the actual exit from the relationship.

    In this case, given the general sentiment and how tight the pre-referendum polls showed the race to be, are you trying to tell me the government had no idea that a Brexit was a possibility? That might explain why they didn't have a team already waiting in the wings to step in after the results had been announced. Now I really don't believe that because it shows that the current government are not forward thinkers, which isn't something we want at all. Is it?

    We are not conforming to Junckers' demands, the government would simply be carrying out the democratic will of its citizens. The EU knows that we are at a disadvantage and it is in their advantage to push negotiations, at the end of the day the UK does not have as much bargaining power as it would like to think.
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    (Original post by Kieran1996)
    All we've basically done it taken the decision making from ***** in the EU, Brussesls to the ***** in Parliament, London
    Basically this.
 
 
 
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