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    (Original post by Abbey15)
    Its okay! Thats true, after doing stupid hours revision you get tired and your hand hurts so i find watching helps even if just one or two new bits of info stick in.

    I also use my mum as a student and explain it all to her it helps as it builds confidence and they will ask when they dont understand what you are saying etc..my mum could have sat my exams 😂 id come home tell her questions on them and shed be like "i hope you included blah,blah and blah" 😂😂😂

    Good luck!
    Haha oh wow ;D!

    Thank you though (:
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    (Original post by Samii123)
    I think it would be better to understand and go over a whole topic, then make questions and answer them to the best of your ability and then look at the answers afterwards
    Oh okay, thanks!
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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    Wow, thanks again for taking time out to respond. I reckon the attention and retrieval stages are the most challenging but with practice I guess it will become less of a daunting experience, right?

    And when you say 2 attempts of the same question do you mean literally working it out again but differently? Do you recommend doing so in the real exam or merely in practice papers?
    It's hard to comment on which stage is hardest, but I'd imagine the attention/encoding steps are and the retrieval step just comes naturally with completing the ridiculous amounts of practice papers.

    I think most people struggle with being able to switch off from Netflix/Facebook and such in general so it's hard to pay attention/revise. I personally found that I feel a lot more motivated to revise in Starbucks than I do at home, I've struggled to keep off my laptop when I am. I don't feel libraries work for me, I feel extremely bored revising in them and I find it harder to ask others for help because it's meant to be quiet.

    Two attempts thing - I do mean doing two workings differently, I think my teacher explained it as an examiner that the mark schemes permit a second answer to be marked if it's clear that it's a second attempt at the answer. There are some situations where it's easy to be unsure between two methods but crossed out answers can't be marked.

    I personally avoid doing it until nearer the end of the exam, it's a waste of time to stay on a question that you find confusing than to move on and come back to it at another point.
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    (Original post by Rather_Cynical)
    It's hard to comment on which stage is hardest, but I'd imagine the attention/encoding steps are and the retrieval step just comes naturally with completing the ridiculous amounts of practice papers.

    I think most people struggle with being able to switch off from Netflix/Facebook and such in general so it's hard to pay attention/revise. I personally found that I feel a lot more motivated to revise in Starbucks than I do at home, I've struggled to keep off my laptop when I am.

    Two attempts thing - I do mean doing two workings differently, I think my teacher explained it as an examiner that the mark schemes permit a second answer to be marked if it's clear that it's a second attempt at the answer. There are some situations where it's easy to be unsure between two methods but crossed out answers can't be marked.

    I personally avoid doing it until nearer the end of the exam, it's a waste of time to stay on a question that you find confusing than to move on and come back to it at another point.
    Your advice has been really helpful, honestly.

    So in essence if I can get rid of distractions in my workplace - or find a workplace free from distractions to begin with - I'll have a much better time with attention, and so the encoding process will likely be made easier.

    Last thing I wanted to ask you though (even though not what I originally wanted to find out) is if there is like a formula to getting an A* in maths? By that I mean a really effective way (or ways) of learning maths and knowing exactly how to apply it where appropriate


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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    Your advice has been really helpful, honestly.

    So in essence if I can get rid of distractions in my workplace - or find a workplace free from distractions to begin with - I'll have a much better time with attention, and so the encoding process will likely be made easier.

    Last thing I wanted to ask you though (even though not what I originally wanted to find out) is if there is like a formula to getting an A* in maths? By that I mean a really effective way (or ways) of learning maths and knowing exactly how to apply it where appropriate


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    I think it's easier to find workplaces free from distractions, self-imposed limits are as effective as you're able to convince yourself that you should have them.

    I think it's better to aim for the A-grade first, then focus purely on learning how to approach and recognise "harder/trickier" questions that are non-standard. In C3, some questions involving trigonometry can be quite difficult and in C4 some questions involving Integration/Vectors can be difficult.

    I try to supplement my learning of those two modules as much as I can by finding extremely difficult C3/4 questions using Gold papers and looking through the worked solution to see how they're approached. Solomon papers are quite good since they give less clues in the question.

    PS - I notice other people have mentioned teaching friends/family, which I've mentioned at some point. That's really helpful for the encoding part of learning.
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    (Original post by Rather_Cynical)
    I think it's easier to find workplaces free from distractions, self-imposed limits are as effective as you're able to convince yourself that you should have them.

    I think it's better to aim for the A-grade first, then focus purely on learning how to approach and recognise "harder/trickier" questions that are non-standard. In C3, some questions involving trigonometry can be quite difficult and in C4 some questions involving Integration/Vectors can be difficult.

    I try to supplement my learning of those two modules as much as I can by finding extremely difficult C3/4 questions using Gold papers and looking through the worked solution to see how they're approached. Solomon papers are quite good since they give less clues in the question.

    PS - I notice other people have mentioned teaching friends/family, which I've mentioned at some point. That's really helpful for the encoding part of learning.
    OK thank you! Thanks so much for everything you've suggested, I will definitely adjust my studying accordingly
    ^.^


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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    So I'm doing:
    - maths
    - further maths
    - physics
    - economics

    And the subjects I'm most worried about are physics and economics only because I'm worried that my interest in the subjects won't be enough to actually make me remember the things I'm learning long-term

    I plan to look at past papers in the period closer to the exams (so next year) but as for now I just want to know how to actually learn the content
    For physics derive anything and everything. As an example, if I need to know that v^2=u^2 +2as, there are two options here. Option one is that I just learn the formula and then I use it to answer the question, i.e. I understand how to use it but not the formula itself, so as a result it's relatively unlikely ti stay in your head for long periods of time. The second method is I derive the formula myself. I now have an understanding of both where the formula comes from and what the assumptions that go into that formula are which gives me a good idea of when it can and cant be used as I understand the limits of the formula (e.g. in that example I need a to be constant when I solve the differential equation or the acceleration will also be integrated with respect to x rather than being output as a constant). This also means that if i cant remember the exact form, I should be able to work it out from my understanding of what it going on. Lastly, don't view a subject or even different subjects as completely separate entities - yes you can probably learn the points needed for each sub section of the spec but often things make a lot more sense using context from other parts of the spec, techniques you learn in further maths that isn't covered in physics etc etc
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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    Oh okay, thanks!
    You're welcome!
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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    Understand, make good notes and regular recapping ... got it!

    Thank you for your advice hun
    No problem.

    To aid understanding, there are many great videos on YouTube, just search for what you want.
    You can make flash cards too if that helps.

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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    What helped you apply what you had learned?
    I used this strategy of writing things out
    And out again for psychology as it was just one bit memory test and my other subjects were English Lang and maths so I didn't really have to do much actual ' application ' in a sense
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    (Original post by samb1234)
    For physics derive anything and everything. As an example, if I need to know that v^2=u^2 +2as, there are two options here. Option one is that I just learn the formula and then I use it to answer the question, i.e. I understand how to use it but not the formula itself, so as a result it's relatively unlikely ti stay in your head for long periods of time. The second method is I derive the formula myself. I now have an understanding of both where the formula comes from and what the assumptions that go into that formula are which gives me a good idea of when it can and cant be used as I understand the limits of the formula (e.g. in that example I need a to be constant when I solve the differential equation or the acceleration will also be integrated with respect to x rather than being output as a constant). This also means that if i cant remember the exact form, I should be able to work it out from my understanding of what it going on. Lastly, don't view a subject or even different subjects as completely separate entities - yes you can probably learn the points needed for each sub section of the spec but often things make a lot more sense using context from other parts of the spec, techniques you learn in further maths that isn't covered in physics etc etc
    I see, thank you

    So basically like relating different concepts, formula etc. with ones from other subjects or even within the same subject i.e. making contextual links
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    I used this strategy of writing things out
    And out again for psychology as it was just one bit memory test and my other subjects were English Lang and maths so I didn't really have to do much actual ' application ' in a sense
    Oh okay, thanks

    So writing things out helped you apply the things you learned in the exam (for psychology) - I suppose that could work perhaps for the essays that come up in Economics right
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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    Oh okay, thanks

    So writing things out helped you apply the things you learned in the exam (for psychology) - I suppose that could work perhaps for the essays that come up in Economics right
    Ifit depends what the essay is because for psychology the essay questions can only be asked in a certain way ' outline and evaluate X' buy if the subject requires you to use some data or a text then this method isn't going to help that much as this method helped me to learn essays word- for - word which I just regurgitated in the exam
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    Ifit depends what the essay is because for psychology the essay questions can only be asked in a certain way ' outline and evaluate X' buy if the subject requires you to use some data or a text then this method isn't going to help that much as this method helped me to learn essays word- for - word which I just regurgitated in the exam
    Oh haha, okay - thanks anyway though (:
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    NB - you mentioned that past papers seem "too random" and unstructured.

    I remember somewhere in the thread that you mentioned doing Maths/Physics/Economics and a fourth subject (I believe it was Chemistry?) I'm not sure about Economics, but for the other three sciences Physics and Maths Tutor breaks it down into topics to learn. Under the various units, you can select "by topic"

    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/chemistry-revision/
    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/physics-revision/
    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/maths-revision/

    If you manage to go through ALL subjects in a module, as well as all past papers, it shouldn't be hard to get a strong grade.
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    (Original post by Rather_Cynical)
    NB - you mentioned that past papers seem "too random" and unstructured.

    I remember somewhere in the thread that you mentioned doing Maths/Physics/Economics and a fourth subject (I believe it was Chemistry?) I'm not sure about Economics, but for the other three sciences Physics and Maths Tutor breaks it down into topics to learn. Under the various units, you can select "by topic"

    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/chemistry-revision/
    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/physics-revision/
    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/maths-revision/

    If you manage to go through ALL subjects in a module, as well as all past papers, it shouldn't be hard to get a strong grade.
    Thanks again! Do they have anything for Further Maths?
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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    My current revision techniques are OK but I don't feel like I retain the information for a long time after studying. I'm looking to make the things I revise memorable so that it doesn't feel random, just natural I guess.

    Things I have already tried and why they don't work for me:

    - past papers - the notes I make from the past papers are hard to align in the order of the specification so I don't like revising from them because it feels too random

    - typing up my notes from class and from textbooks - takes too long and I lose focus, don't understand a thing, and end up revising from the textbook I got the notes from (yes, even if I make the notes my own words)

    - passively reading textbooks - I lose focus when I read in my head, I get a headache hearing my own voice read out loud

    So.........

    IS THERE ANYTHING THAT WORKS?

    Like, actually works
    I would suggest maybe making colourful posters to hang up your bedroom wall as you maybe a visual learner, you could also make small notes or just repeating the revision notes to yourself, just repeating and talking out aloud whilst revising may help.

    other then that idk what else to say so hope this helped
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    Example Question

    "Rutherford designed an experiment to see what happened when alpha particles were directed at a piece of gold foil. Summarise the observations and state the conclusion Rutherford reached about the structure of gold atoms. (5)"

    What was the experiment?

    Alpha particles were shot at a very thin sheet of gold foil only a few atoms thick. This was done to find out how the charge was distributed, the prevailing theory at the time was a plum pudding model where positive and negative charge was mixed around like vegetable soup.

    What happened?

    As expected, most alpha particles went straight through.

    But some were deflected, and a few deflected at large angles which didn't fit very well into the previous theory. I think Rutherford himself remarked that it was almost as incredible as if you'd shot a piece of tissue paper with a .50" calliber rifle and the shots rebounded right back at you.

    For context, it was less than 1% of alpha particles that deflected right back.

    What could be concluded?

    Most alpha particles went straight through with no deflection, so it must be mostly empty space because if something was in the way then deflections would occur.

    Most of the mass must be very small/dense, because if it was big then a larger proportion will be deflected.

    The nucleus must be charged to cause small angle deflections.

    The nucleus must contain most of the mass as interactions with the electrons allow the alpha particles to pass right through

    Exam answers

    Observations

    Most alpha particles went straight through (1)
    Some were deflected (1)
    Few deflected at large angles (1)

    Conclusions

    Mainly empty space (1)
    Nucleus must be very small/dense (1)
    Nucleus must be charged (1)
    Nucleus contains most of the mass (1)

    If you answer in a longer, more descriptive/essay-based way instead of summarizing the key points then you're losing time efficiency (this particular question should take no more than 5 minutes, if you're stuck for more than 2 minutes you should move on and come back when it becomes a little clearer in your head).

    This kind of systematic approach is essential for exam success.
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    (Original post by wolfslayer1)
    Thanks again! Do they have anything for Further Maths?
    Looks like they do, http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/maths-revision/
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    (Original post by Hardigan)
    Just a general study tip but always study with a pen. I find I never learn unless I'm writing the stuff down.
    Thanks! Makes it more active right?
 
 
 
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