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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    ...it seems you don't know what an average is bro.

    That maths average could be a couple ballers who landed IB, consulting and software gigs then the rest are working in at best semi-skilled work for a small business of some sort. Likewise, the sociology average might be skewed as most sociology grads don't want to work in a job that pays 'highly'. Maybe they go into training for social work? Or they get a research assistant job or they go into entry level recruitment?*

    It's never as clean cut as average salary. *
    Wow! Okay 😂 Bruvo 👏

    Back to the original purpose of this discussion, a father is concerned about his child taking out a £27,000 loan to study something which at the end has comparatively lower paid jobs and also a sector which relies heavily on Gov. Spending and by the looks of things, the future for the economy is uncertain.

    Anyway, good luck to the person who raised this issue but like I said original, do what you love.
    Dw about what else I said because as this person has stated, it's all invalid.

    Once again, Good Luck!
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    Experience is pretty much all that is needed these days in my field (IT & Technology sector), and in some cases many SMEs, startups, digital agencies etc. will take you on if you can demonstrate your skills with a strong portfolio of personal projects and contributions etc. regardless of commercial experience.*

    I'd advise the OP to at least consider a part-time degree and work alongside as a backup, or just work in an entry-level role related to the degree and within 3 years they could easily move up in their role, rather than 3 years spent in full-time study of the degree itself. But ultimately, their choice I guess - sure they could get lucky with a work placement/internship, but false hope and all...

    *All depends on how you prepare your CV and present yourself at the interview(s) of course. Too many horrible CVs out there by people with the most impressive of backgrounds and all too ignorant of the sifting process.

    I did Computer Science, but I did not get employed solely because of that, and if that's all I had done then I would never have gotten employed at all.
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    (Original post by InvestmentBankin)
    Okay do not get so upset. This just shows your insecurity as a historian. You must admit that both rank pretty low in terms of employability (which is what OP was asking about) as compared to STEM subjects. In fact, all social sciences and humanities rank similarly in terms of employability. It is also better to have a Sociology degree from Oxford than a History one from, say, Edinburgh. If both History and Sociology bachelors were from Oxbridge, to me it is the same intellectual level and I would personally regard them as such. I find it amusing when other humanities or social sciences students are looking down on Sociology.
    Oxford doesn't offer Sociology

    edit: are you sure you went there?
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    OP: nike. just do it.
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    (Original post by J.Page)
    Wow! Okay 😂 Bruvo 👏

    Back to the original purpose of this discussion, a father is concerned about his child taking out a £27,000 loan to study something which at the end has comparatively lower paid jobs and also a sector which relies heavily on Gov. Spending and by the looks of things, the future for the economy is uncertain.

    Anyway, good luck to the person who raised this issue but like I said original, do what you love.
    Dw about what else I said because as this person has stated, it's all invalid.

    Once again, Good Luck!
    I'm not sure you're following, it's about selectiom bias on the part of graduates. A maths grad is no more qualified to sling PowerPoint's and excel models together in IBD than a maths grad is - but the latter is more likely to apply to those jobs. At the end of the day, 70-80% of grad jobs are degree agnostic - preferring candidates to have specific characteristics, skills and experience rather than a specific degree.*

    There are only a few jobs available at the end of a Maths which a Sociology grad is unqualified for merely by being a sociology grad.
 
 
 
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