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    (Original post by rimstone)
    I honestly have no idea what youre on about, the views of an 18 year old explain why a political party should not be incharge of the treasury ?. At the end of the day i worked for the money, it wasn't handed to me, have you even worked a day in your life ? ; so i have the right to spend it how i like. Secondly as a 18 year old i have very little to spend my money on, i mean most of the money people i know, i wouldnt go as far as to say my age group, goes to drugs, cigs, alcohol and maybe clothes, just to illustrate, i had about 7 pounds left in my account and so did my friend, he spent his money getting a porn subscription, were as i spent it on membership, im not massively political, i just went onto the website, and saw it was a pound a year, which i wasn't expecting, and i thought a pounds gonna get
    me what ? a few mins/secs or some high or another, so i guess in a way it does show Labour , someone who worked, giving a little away to something he believes in for other people, even if it is fr the party, and giving up a small high/comfort. excuse me for being such an arse and thinking one pound wasn't a lot of money,

    also how does my view have anything to do with the debate, what is really wrong with jeremy ? ...
    I like next to his constituency and its offers some of the best social security around; though some debate on whether it's camden. He has left wing views, which i agree with, once again excuse me for growing up and living in a working class area, which has formed my political views, and i see very little on why he's a bad choice, i mean his competition right now, angela, i knew and saw about her before her bid and me and some friends are commenting on how much of a **** speaker and debater she is. She is in not way the best that labour can offer, i can accept there better people than jeremy, but none of them are running, so ill go for the clearly better option.
    I guess if you were only 12 at the time it might have passed you by but ....
    http://www.theguardian.com/politics/...note-successor

    The quoted comment about a pound being nothing which it quite clearly isn't (excuse the pedantry) what a light-hearted attempt to link it to Labour boogering up managing the purse strings.

    I get it, you like Corbyn, but time will you that his ideology is naive and
    backward thinking. Young people like yourself getting taken in by the "Let's level the playing field" but seem to overlook that you have to encourage and incentivise the wealth creators to do literally that as it is they that create the jobs for others. The answer is not to have a huge public service (Google Blair's record on that) as they do not have a net contribution to the State coffers.

    As much as I dislike Blair for many things (not just Iraq) he was (re) elected because he trumpeted policies that appealed to enough people in a FPTP system. Blair and Brown spent money they did not have and wasted £Bns of what we did* hence the huge deficit that led to people that think like you despising the Tory/LD Austerity program.
    http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed...ut-large-ameri

    Corbyn is only succeeding in winning the hearts and minds of thousands of young people like yourself who have not had the misfortune to see the damage a left wing Government can cause.

    So, be very careful what you wish for as a Government led by Corbyn would be a disaster for the UK. It would repeat the same mistake any Left of centre Government makes but in Corbyn's case with bells on.
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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    I find it frustrating that being quiet, humble and honest makes you unelectable.
    Sums it up perfectly, and it's why I do have a fair bit of sympathy for him even though I strongly disagree with quite a few of his views, especially his opposition to air strikes on ISIS and his desire to scrap trident and cut back on defence which I feel is downright idiotic.

    Despite disagreeing with Corbyn on quite a few things, I have sympathy for him when a bunch of politicians in the Labour party (some of whom seem to be political opportunists more concerned about themselves) tried to force him to resign in a pre-planned coup, and then wanted him excluded from the leadership election. Corbyn for all his flaws represents a particular brand of anti establisment politics. This isn't just about Corbyn, this is about a wider political battle which I don't want "politics as usual" to win.

    I don't like Corbyn that much and wouldn't vote for him, but I really don't like a lot of his strongest opponents either. I find myself in an awkward position really.
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    (Original post by RF_PineMarten)
    Sums it up perfectly, and it's why I do have a fair bit of sympathy for him even though I strongly disagree with quite a few of his views, especially his opposition to air strikes on ISIS and his desire to scrap trident and cut back on defence which I feel is downright idiotic.

    Despite disagreeing with Corbyn on quite a few things, I have sympathy for him when a bunch of politicians in the Labour party (some of whom seem to be political opportunists more concerned about themselves) tried to force him to resign in a pre-planned coup, and then wanted him excluded from the leadership election. Corbyn for all his flaws represents a particular brand of anti establisment politics. This isn't just about Corbyn, this is about a wider political battle which I don't want "politics as usual" to win.

    I don't like Corbyn that much and wouldn't vote for him, but I really don't like a lot of his strongest opponents either. I find myself in an awkward position really.
    I sympathise. I agree 100% with the point about anti-establish changing the mode politics, why on earth should all leaders have to follow the same boring generic template. Corbyns views represent my own quite well, so for me the choice is easy. Problem is prominent Blairities openly critical and don't support socialism at all (Blair's point on this concerned me as I think Lab should aim for socialism, but if not practical, then accept a diluted form) now the Chilcot Report has pretty much earmarked who the Left side of the party can regard as ally/enemy. Even if he's not electable, Labour needs to shift Left, otherwise we pull closer and closer into Conservative centre ground politics. The ideal scenario for me is Corbyn wins the election, some Blairities return to cabinet posts and they agree to back him until the election when they genuinely would reconsider if he's made progress. Smith and Eagle don't appeal to me at all and if one of them was to win a heavily suspicious *voting contest, we'll probably look at a lawsuit over the vote, Lefties will flock to the Greens, union funding dries up.
 
 
 
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