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    (Original post by Katiee224)
    What if it's a STEM subject at london met? :007:
    For engineering and software at least, it doesn't matter that much. Everything else (as the other disciplines are pretty generalist post-undergrad and good PhD programs are snobby), it'd be tough.

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    Codswallop
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    would getting a degree be pointless for a software engineer or is it more about the experience?
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    would getting a degree be pointless for a software engineer or is it more about the experience?
    It's not pointless at all, most of the top companies specifically recruit grads

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    (Original post by TobaccoSmoke)
    Really career success comes down to natural talent and the drive to succeed in my opinion. I highly doubt that the vast majority of Arts and Social Science graduates get any further in their careers with their degree than if they hadn't bothered to do a degree.
    Lol, so in your opinion there is no hope for someone like me ,because I don't have any natural talents. Guess im screwed then xD
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    (Original post by TimGB)
    Those look boring af.

    Far better to get a good grade in a subject you love and risk a slightly lower salary or at worst, unemployment, than to take one of those courses, where you will likely fail due to lack of interest and thus go unemployed anyway, and even if you pass you gain 50 years of work in living hell as your dreams are crushed by a job you never wanted in the first place. Life isn't about money, it's about happiness. Sometimes money can buy happiness, but if making money requires crushing your passion, it's probably not worth it.
    Life isn't about money, but money makes life a whole lot nicer. Now you go and spend 30k partying at uni and your career in a call centre while someone else spends 30 years earning decent cash and visiting the world, providing for their family etc.

    "Boring af" what a child you are :rofl:
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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    I'm yet to see an entry level job that asks for specific business qualifications and doesn't ask for a degree. If you could find me a couple that would be greatly appreciated

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    I'm not a job board.
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    (Original post by geoking)
    Life isn't about money, but money makes life a whole lot nicer. Now you go and spend 30k partying at uni and your career in a call centre while someone else spends 30 years earning decent cash and visiting the world, providing for their family etc.

    "Boring af" what a child you are :rofl:
    These two examples aren't mutually exclusive.

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    (Original post by geoking)
    Life isn't about money, but money makes life a whole lot nicer. Now you go and spend 30k partying at uni and your career in a call centre while someone else spends 30 years earning decent cash and visiting the world, providing for their family etc.

    "Boring af" what a child you are :rofl:
    Got to agree here. Sure you may have got a good grade and a subject you love in a frame, but it doesn't seem so great when your job leaves you with £200 a month to live off after paying rent, bills, overdraft fees.

    Money makes life a lot easier.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    These two examples aren't mutually exclusive.

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    Nope, but choosing a degree on the basis of whether you like it or not, rather than what career it'll provide, is dumb as ****.
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    (Original post by slee551)
    I have to agree with you! A lot of the degree courses are rather pointless and a waste of money. Majority of people I know just do a degree for the sake of having a degree. In September I hope to study psychology which is a pointless degree if that's the only level you reach to. I'm hoping to do a doctorate in clinical psychology or a PhD after my degree. But to be honest, many that just do a degree won't really get anywhere unless they have a solid plan or goals to do further study or a specific career.
    So ****ing true, I learned the hard way. Still the cost of higher education in UK and US, total ****ing sham.
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    (Original post by geoking)
    Nope, but choosing a degree on the basis of whether you like it or not, rather than what career it'll provide, is dumb as ****.
    Most degrees don't lead to specific careers.. Most (70-80%) grad jobs don't even require a specific degree. So I'm afraid your assertion doesn't stand.

    I'd change it to: 'do what you want but be career conscious whilst at uni'

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    (Original post by geoking)
    Nope, but choosing a degree on the basis of whether you like it or not, rather than what career it'll provide, is dumb as ****.
    Lucky for you, most people are able to choose something they both love and can make a good career out of.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    These two examples aren't mutually exclusive.

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    (Original post by geoking)
    Nope, but choosing a degree on the basis of whether you like it or not, rather than what career it'll provide, is dumb as ****.
    I agree geo but Princiepie, erm working in a call centre for 30 years after going in debt at uni, and able to travel the world at the same time and provide for family? I'd call those mutually exclusive mate.
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    Lucky for you, most people are able to choose something they both love and can make a good career out of.
    "Most?" Lol no many-possibly. Maybe in your utopian dreams, most people are happy with their lives after mountains of student debt and a climate of unemployment in their area, so chronic unemployment for themselves and working somewhere they're overqualified to work despite having sacrificed at uni. Don't ignore that reality.
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    "Most?" Lol no many-possibly. Maybe in your utopian dreams, most people are happy with their lives after mountains of student debt and a climate of unemployment in their area, so chronic unemployment for themselves and working somewhere they're overqualified to work despite having sacrificed at uni. Don't ignore that reality.
    I mean, you might be right. I don't know for sure. I'm going off the fact that a significant minority of our population is unemployed, and that graduate unemployment is low.
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    I agree geo but Princiepie, erm working in a call centre for 30 years after going in debt at uni, and able to travel the world at the same time and provide for family? I'd call those mutually exclusive mate.
    He assumes that the uni path leads to a call center and not going but working for the same 30 years doesn't.

    The majority of grads will not be working in call centres and by virtue of the skills/network they've gained from university will have on average more opportunities than a non-grad.

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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    I mean, you might be right. I don't know for sure. I'm going off the fact that a significant minority of our population is unemployed, and that graduate unemployment is low.
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    He assumes that the uni path leads to a call center and not going but working for the same 30 years doesn't.

    The majority of grads will not be working in call centres and by virtue of the skills/network they've gained from university will have on average more opportunities than a non-grad.

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    Tanya what do you mean significant minority? I'm sure you can google a stat that shows a single digit percentage of grad unemployment and I agree that going to Uni is miles better than not, conceptually, but the reality is that behind that possibly "insignificant" percentage of grad unemployment is 100s of 1000s if not millions of unemployed people, grads or not. Something is scarily wrong there.

    And princie adding to what I said to tanya just now, how do you know the majority or a significant amount of grads won't be working somewhere they're overqualified to work because it's currently all they can get, in their industry or their area?...Also, grads is a vague term. Specifically people graduating from whatever they've studied--unless you already have or are willing to research (not retrieve google links who claim to have conveniently done it, but actually research yourself)--which degree studies among all grads encounter unemployment the most. Maybe that can being to introduce you to the reality, dunno.
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    And princie adding to what I said to tanya just now, how do you know the majority or a significant amount of grads won't be working somewhere they're overqualified to work because it's currently all they can get, in their industry or their area?...Also, grads is a vague term. Specifically people graduating from whatever they've studied--unless you already have or are willing to research (not retrieve google links who claim to have conveniently done it, but actually research yourself)--which degree studies among all grads encounter unemployment the most. Maybe that can being to introduce you to the reality, dunno.
    The data is pretty easily accessible bro. ~70% of working grads are in grad level jobs. Most grads don't work in their 'area' but they do work in graduate level jobs across a spectrum of large companies and SMEs.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    The data is pretty easily accessible bro. ~70% of working grads are in grad level jobs. Most grads don't work in their 'area' but they do work in graduate level jobs across a spectrum of large companies and SMEs.

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    Again how do you know most grads don't work in their, yes, area, and no clue why you've quoted that. Many people work close to where they live...problem? And ok if it's easily accessible then share with us...and you're still providing not only broad stats for the general grad and not for a specific industry, which means you're showing the collective amount and not aware of the actual employment crises within...but you're also posting 70% like that's good. That's nearly 30% unemployed constantly, which like I said is 100s of 1000s if not millions of people unemployed. If you are aware of which industries suffer unemployment the most then maybe we can get somewhere and point the fingers at -this- degree study or that, instead of generalising the employment or unemployment of grads is my point. And since you say it's easily accessible "bro,"...let's go. Show me which grad jobs in which fields suffer unemployment the most, since you say sweeping statements like "most" all the time as if you know
 
 
 
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