Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    The other guy said PM, not party leader. But see my above post.
    The PM is just the party leader of the winning party though...?
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    Ok fair enough, but they were still in the Lords. I thought you meant someone outside of Parliament, probably shouldn't have said only 'MPs'.
    Even then there's no law against it, just convention.

    British constitutional law is a rather curious thing. But all the Leavers seem to like it that way
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    The PM is just the party leader of the winning party though...?
    S/he just needs to have the support of parliament. Not necessarily be the leader of, or even in, the largest party - e.g a coalition of 2 smaller parties could be larger than the largest party - and the coalition chooses who is to be PM. That person *could* be someone other than the leaders of the 2 parties.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    The PM is just the party leader of the winning party though...?
    And that's what I said, but the key word(s) is 'in parliament'.
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    The other guy said PM, not party leader. But see my above post.
    I was tallking about PM. Difference between law and convention.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    And that's what I said, but the key word(s) is 'in parliament'.
    I don't follow.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    I don't follow.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...4&postcount=43
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    The PM is just the party leader of the winning party though...?
    That is not necessarily true. Churchill was PM in 1940-45 without being a party leader.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    I don't follow.
    They have to be the leader of the parliamentary party, so either elected MPs or appointed Lords (except hereditary peers I guess).
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RuWill2001)
    I love Nicola Sturgeon and think she is doing a great job in Scotland. I don't get why people do not like her...
    i cannot stand the woman. she keeps going on about another Scottish referendum when they just had one and would keep wanting them until she gets what she wants, at the end of the day thats all she cares about, she wants Scotland to be independent to further herself and not the wellbeing of the countrymen. personally i want Scotland out, we pay for their free university. we pay for their NHS fees when they are more overweight and more of a strain on the service.
    • Political Ambassador
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by gladders)
    She'd need to be elected to the UK Parliament first...
    Not at all

    (Original post by JRKinder)
    wtf no we haven't? The PM is the leader of the largest party in Parliament, ergo they have to be an MP.
    There is no constitutional requirement, a number of PMs have been members of the Lords and never been MPs, probably the best known being Wellington
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    They have to be the leader of the parliamentary party, so either elected MPs or appointed Lords (except hereditary peers I guess).
    No they don't.

    Don't you read my, and others, posts?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    No they don't.

    Don't you read my, and others, posts?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yes, the parliamentary party leader isn't necessarily the same thing as the leader of the wider party. The PM has to be drawn from parliament.

    Edit: just read the Wikipedia page on it to clarify, whilst not necessarily stipulating that they must leader per se, they must be the most likely person to command the confidence of the chamber. So I guess whilst it is not necessarily mandated by law that they must be leader, I don't see why they wouldn't be as the leader would presumably have the most authority.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Regardless of the bickering, no, we don't want her and nor would the country.

    And with only 51(?) MPs they fall a long way down the list in parliament.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    Yes, the parliamentary party leader isn't necessarily the same thing as the leader of the wider party. The PM has to be drawn from parliament.

    Edit: just read the Wikipedia page on it to clarify, whilst not necessarily stipulating that they must leader per se, they must be the most likely person to command the confidence of the chamber. So I guess whilst it is not necessarily mandated by law that they must be leader, I don't see why they wouldn't be as the leader would presumably have the most authority.
    Churchill.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    So I guess whilst it is not necessarily mandated by law that they must be leader, I don't see why they wouldn't be as the leader would presumably have the most authority.
    Chamberlain remained as Conservative leader after Churchill became PM in 1940, until just before his his death. Lord Halifax was the deputy and was widely expected to succeed Chamberlain as PM.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Churchill.
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Chamberlain remained as Conservative leader after Churchill became PM in 1940, until just before his his death. Lord Halifax was the deputy and was widely expected to succeed Chamberlain as PM.
    Note I said not necessarily mandated. So I accept that you don't legally have to be, I was just suggesting it's overwhelmingly most likely that they will be leader, as they are most likely to command the confidence of most people.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Not at all



    There is no constitutional requirement, a number of PMs have been members of the Lords and never been MPs, probably the best known being Wellington
    That was then this is now. Even Wellington sat in the House of Lords, and no peer has been PM for a hundred years. It's pretty much essential the PM be in the Commons today.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    Ok fair enough, but they were still in the Lords. I thought you meant someone outside of Parliament, probably shouldn't have said only 'MPs'.
    Well sturgeon is part of the Scottish parliament thing. At least she has been elected unlike a Lord...
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by JRKinder)
    Note I said not necessarily mandated. So I accept that you don't legally have to be, I was just suggesting it's overwhelmingly most likely that they will be leader, as they are most likely to command the confidence of most people.
    If we have learnt anything from the past couple of weeks it is just because something is unlikely doesn't mean it can't happen.

    The point is it's possible.

    After the Referendum the most likely thing was BoJo becoming PM. Among the least likely things at any stage was him being FoSec.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 16, 2016
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.