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How much do your parents spend on your birthday? Watch

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    (Original post by tianshan)
    On average, parents spend between 0.0025% to 0.005% of their annual income on their teens' birthday, which may include buying presents, hosting parties and going out for dinner.

    How about your parents?
    Nothing even though I'd like to, what happens instead is I splash on myself
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    Nothing, she can't afford to. I don't mind though.
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    (Original post by tianshan)
    On average, parents spend between 0.0025% to 0.005% of their annual income on their teens' birthday, which may include buying presents, hosting parties and going out for dinner.

    How about your parents?
    well my 18th cost £400 give or take or about 0.016% on that occasion
    which was the last birthday I had any money off them for celebration purposes I just get a token gift now (a bottle of single barrel jack was my last and before that it was markers mark and before than Woodford reserve)
    now I just invite a few people and go for a decent dining experience and cocktails
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    (Original post by fg45344)
    wow, £6000, what did you do with it?
    Well about £500 was cash, which I'm saving, then a DSLR camera and equipment for around £1000 plus a trip to Hong Kong being around £4,000-£4,500 so not £6,000 in cash, but still pretty big!
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    (Original post by Reachin4TheStars)
    £5, A card and chocolate box, usually, but my birthday's coming up next friday and we'll see.
    :jumphug: n my bday is aug 11 so we'll see what happens as well. I'm grown so I don't get gifts from my folks, we just come together for a dinner and drinks, but people slip me some money even when I refuse. Someone better slip man a iPhone



    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Bout tree fiddy.
    you said you're in your 20s. You still get bday money from your folks? :teehee:
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    (Original post by jamesthehustler)
    well my 18th cost £400 give or take or about 0.016% on that occasion
    which was the last birthday I had any money off them for celebration purposes I just get a token gift now (a bottle of single barrel jack was my last and before that it was markers mark and before than Woodford reserve)
    now I just invite a few people and go for a decent dining experience and cocktails
    exactly what I just said lol that's what adults do
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    Oh wow thanks a lot ; I shall look more into the vanguard funds, and I am very tempted to invest some money at the start of uni and then hopefully gain some form of return a few years after graduating hmm ; can you reccomend any good vanguard funds like how do you know if they're legit ? Sorry if that made no sense
    You need to invest via a broker and preferably in a stocks and shares ISA so you are immune from capital gains tax (if you go over your limit) and dividends tax.

    So brokers these days are Equiniti, Hargreaves Lansdown, Barclays etc etc
    I use Hargreaves Lansdown

    So just sign up on the website with your national insurance number and put the money in the ISA stocks and shares account via your bank account. Then you will find a whole list of bonds, shares, funds etc you can invest in. The money is held on the stockbrokers account and easily be topped up and withdraw back into your bank account.

    All these people are FCA (Financial Conduct Authority) regulated and people get some serious jail time trying to defraud the financial system.
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    I don't really ask for much, but I did get tickets to the RMA vs ACMilan football game and an acoustic guitar... on two different occasions.
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    (Original post by fg45344)
    You need to invest via a broker and preferably in a stocks and shares ISA so you are immune from capital gains tax (if you go over your limit) and dividends tax.

    So brokers these days are Equiniti, Hargreaves Lansdown, Barclays etc etc
    I use Hargreaves Lansdown

    So just sign up on the website with your national insurance number and put the money in the ISA stocks and shares account via your bank account. Then you will find a whole list of bonds, shares, funds etc you can invest in. The money is held on the stockbrokers account and easily be topped up and withdraw back into your bank account.

    All these people are FCA (Financial Conduct Authority) regulated and people get some serious jail time trying to defraud the financial system.
    ha but with equiniti i tried to sell some shares the other month and they charged me £45 commission so i ended up with £3 in total despite my shares being worth £48 originally -_- but yh I guess i could try one of these services hmmm
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    ha but with equiniti i tried to sell some shares the other month and they charged me £45 commission so i ended up with £3 in total despite my shares being worth £48 originally -_- but yh I guess i could try one of these services hmmm
    Usually the commission is around £8-£12 a buy/sell, so £8-£12 for the buy and £8-£12 for the sell, on top of stamp duty if you are buying a large value in shares.

    They key is waiting for the right buying moment, you'll find the market is like someone with bipolar disorder, one minute they are all happy and the next all sad. You need to buy when the market is super pessimistic for a stock, for example what BT stock is trading at today.

    No point buying on the high, watching the stock correct and then having to wait 2-3 years to make any money on it.
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    (Original post by 0to100)



    you said you're in your 20s. You still get bday money from your folks? :teehee:
    As I said, bout tree fiddy.


    Seriously though, yeah, my family buy me gifts. I buy them gifts on their bday too, regardless of their age. We all do it. Just how we do things.
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    (Original post by fg45344)
    Usually the commission is around £8-£12 a buy/sell, so £8-£12 for the buy and £8-£12 for the sell, on top of stamp duty if you are buying a large value in shares.

    They key is waiting for the right buying moment, you'll find the market is like someone with bipolar disorder, one minute they are all happy and the next all sad. You need to buy when the market is super pessimistic for a stock, for example what BT stock is trading at today.

    No point buying on the high, watching the stock correct and then having to wait 2-3 years to make any money on it.
    ah you seem so knowledgeable at stocks and stuff ; my company just awarded me shares and I sold them via Equniit and didn't realise they'd charge so much but I learn my lesson and yh true you have to be patient with the markets. I might use my uni bursary money to start a bit of investing in septmeber seeing as I don't really need the extra cash but I don't know anything about markets and stuff
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    I get given money most of the time, as I have no idea what I want. Usually it's around £100.
    As a child, they'd get me things that were usually much less. £100 would've been the limit, I think.
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    My parents are divorced but nothing really for birthdays. Like my mum sends me about £200 each month to help me with rent and food since I live alone so I don't really expect her to spend even more money on me cause it's my birthday. All I get from my dad is a message on Skype or Facebook if he remembers
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    for my 18th, my dad put 1600 in my bank
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    ah you seem so knowledgeable at stocks and stuff ; my company just awarded me shares and I sold them via Equniit and didn't realise they'd charge so much but I learn my lesson and yh true you have to be patient with the markets. I might use my uni bursary money to start a bit of investing in septmeber seeing as I don't really need the extra cash but I don't know anything about markets and stuff
    Yeah you need a crash course in finance, I only know about investing because my MSc was in finance and econometrics. So half the modules I did were in investments, corporate finance, financial derivatives etc, so it helps in a way.

    I think BT looks like a great buy today, it's gone down because of all these broadband issues, but memory in finance is short and you need to remember that.

    Best to invest for the long term, buy at a good price and hold forever reinvesting dividends. Don't get into a habit of day trading because when the trade doesn't go your way you end up selling and raking in more and more transaction costs.

    With transaction costs around £10 both ways, it's best to invest £1000-£2000 at a time in a security (share, bond etc). Anything less and the transaction fees take all your profit.

    With market panic only the brokers make money. If you are buying on the high and selling on the dip, you will find yourself broke in no time. The best way to make money is always go against the market.


    "You need to be fearful when others are greedy and greedy only when others are fearful. That's how you make money on wall street"

    Benjamin Graham
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    "as little as possible"
    a quote from my dad
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    (Original post by CheeseIsVeg)
    "as little as possible"
    a quote from my dad
    not even a packet of cheese and veg crisps
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    not even a packet of cheese and veg crisps
    not even
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    cos thats :naughty:
    every1 knows salt and vinegar ist das beste XD
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    (Original post by CheeseIsVeg)
    not even
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    cos thats :naughty:
    every1 knows salt and vinegar ist das beste XD
    I'd personally opt for ready salted heh
 
 
 
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