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    (Original post by usycool1)
    Hey everyone.

    So this thread has mainly been inspired by The_Lonely_Goatherd's Mental Health AMA thread. It's a bit of a continuation to my depressive episode from Sixth Form but I'll keep it very brief.

    As some of you may know, I started Medical School this year after the whole adventure I had during Sixth Form/my gap year and while it started of very well, things got absolutely crazy again during second term and by third term, I found myself admit in a Psychiatric Hospital. My depression was back but this time it was even more severe than last time, and resulted in some psychotic episodes too.

    Basically, I went out for dinner somewhere late at night one day and decided to go for a visit to Lords in London (being a massive cricket fan ). Then before I knew it, something happened that made me insanely upset and led to a very bad psychotic episode. I was then taken in blue lights by an ambulance to the mental health unit of a hospital, where a psychiatrist suggested for me to be admit in a psychiatric hospital for a few days. There were no hospital beds in the whole of London, however, so I was transferred outside of London to a private hospital the next day.

    I stayed there for a few days before I decided to self discharge myself - not because I felt better really, but because I had my first year exams in a few days and I wanted to have a shot at them...

    Anyway, ever since, I can't say I've been at 100% but I've learnt to be way more open about my Mental Health now and want to give the encouragement to others to not be afraid to open up too, should they want to. The stigma is absolute bull****. I started a Mental Health blog (not on TSR) to try to keep myself busy that way and even though it's very early, I'm seriously beginning to think about a career in psychiatry now.

    I've seen many myths circulating around about what happens in a psychiatric hospital, and this seems to put many people off from seeking help in the first place when they need it. So I thought I'd make this thread to answer anyone's questions about what my experiences were like there, or to answer questions about my mental health experiences in general.

    Just as an aside - please keep all questions sensible. I will remove any questions where there is malice intended, and will take appropriate action on those posts. I may also have to remove some posts if they're triggering too, but I won't take any action there if it's not intentional.
    (Original post by usycool1)
    Hey everyone.

    So this thread has mainly been inspired by The_Lonely_Goatherd's Mental Health AMA thread. It's a bit of a continuation to my depressive episode from Sixth Form but I'll keep it very brief.

    As some of you may know, I started Medical School this year after the whole adventure I had during Sixth Form/my gap year and while it started of very well, things got absolutely crazy again during second term and by third term, I found myself admit in a Psychiatric Hospital. My depression was back but this time it was even more severe than last time, and resulted in some psychotic episodes too.

    Basically, I went out for dinner somewhere late at night one day and decided to go for a visit to Lords in London (being a massive cricket fan ). Then before I knew it, something happened that made me insanely upset and led to a very bad psychotic episode. I was then taken in blue lights by an ambulance to the mental health unit of a hospital, where a psychiatrist suggested for me to be admit in a psychiatric hospital for a few days. There were no hospital beds in the whole of London, however, so I was transferred outside of London to a private hospital the next day.

    I stayed there for a few days before I decided to self discharge myself - not because I felt better really, but because I had my first year exams in a few days and I wanted to have a shot at them...

    Anyway, ever since, I can't say I've been at 100% but I've learnt to be way more open about my Mental Health now and want to give the encouragement to others to not be afraid to open up too, should they want to. The stigma is absolute bull****. I started a Mental Health blog (not on TSR) to try to keep myself busy that way and even though it's very early, I'm seriously beginning to think about a career in psychiatry now.

    I've seen many myths circulating around about what happens in a psychiatric hospital, and this seems to put many people off from seeking help in the first place when they need it. So I thought I'd make this thread to answer anyone's questions about what my experiences were like there, or to answer questions about my mental health experiences in general.

    Just as an aside - please keep all questions sensible. I will remove any questions where there is malice intended, and will take appropriate action on those posts. I may also have to remove some posts if they're triggering too, but I won't take any action there if it's not intentional.
    I'm starting medical school in September and I've got my grades and all of that side of things has been sorted. I'm recovering from anorexia and depression and I used to self harm, I'm pretty much recovered but I still take antidepressants and I'm almost weight restored. I declared it on my occupational health form because they asked about it and now they want more information from my GP and eating disorder service, they've both written to OH and I'm just waiting to hear back. I'm so worried that they might make me defer for a year, do you think they will? Have you found uni and OH supportive?
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    (Original post by bullettheory)
    I think that the staff in the NHS would like to be able to offer therapy, regular med reviews, intensive support, OT activities and so on that the private sector can provide, however there just isn't enough money. They do try to provide the activities but they never have enough staff to do it.

    There is also an immense bed pressure which means they can discharge early. At the daily bed manager meetings, the staff are asked to identify the least unwell patient who wasn't due to be discharged, but who could be discharged to free up a bed space for a more unwell patient. There are hardly enough spaces for those who are detained, yet alone those who are informal. All of this combined mean that the NHS discharge once your risk can be managed in the community. I know of patients who have been discharged who are still suicidal. There is also a much higher threshold for admission than privately when it's just a case of if you can pay, then you can stay.

    The priory charge around £1000 a night per bed. I seem to remember that a NHS hospital is around £500-600 depending on the type of hospital. That extra goes a long way.
    Ah right, I see what you are saying. I've constantly been impressed by the healthcare professionals who I have had (both on the NHS and privately) bar one GP, but I've also seen how lack of funding too has been a problem. I myself was actually taken to a priory when there were a lack of NHS beds, so perhaps that's why I had a very good experience.

    I do hope mental health care improve in the UK.

    I meant like you said you had some psychotic experiences. Did you know at the time it was psychosis or did you lose insight? Did they give medication to help with that or was it just time? * Posted from TSR Mobile
    Oh right

    The first time I heard stuff, I could tell that it wasn't real but it did scare me a lot nevertheless. Perhaps it was just the shock of it all but I remember being too scared to sleep at night in case I'd start hearing things again, and I was very scared that my depression was getting out of control and that I was losing myself.

    It slowly began to get worse with me being more and more unable to recognise what was real and what was not and in some cases, I'd hear something and think it was not real when it actually was too. Like I remember once the fire alarm went off where I was and I thought that it was just a delusion with everyone running about and trying to leave, but it turned out to be real. The opposite is also true where I would see things others wouldn't and would severely confuse my friends.*

    I am slowly beginning to get an insight back into reality, however, and I think it's been a combination of meds and therapy that has been helping. My episodes aren't as often or severe as they used to be so I'm hoping that I'm getting there slowly.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm starting medical school in September and I've got my grades and all of that side of things has been sorted. I'm recovering from anorexia and depression and I used to self harm, I'm pretty much recovered but I still take antidepressants and I'm almost weight restored. I declared it on my occupational health form because they asked about it and now they want more information from my GP and eating disorder service, they've both written to OH and I'm just waiting to hear back. I'm so worried that they might make me defer for a year, do you think they will? Have you found uni and OH supportive?
    Congrats on getting a place, and I'm sorry to hear about your depression and anorexia.

    Firstly, you did the exact right thing in letting OH know about these things. That's exactly what you're meant to do so kudos to you for doing so.*

    I don't know if they'll make you defer a year or not, but if you're recovering well and if your team/GP have mentioned that to your Med School, then hopefully it should be fine. I'm just speculating, however, and can't give a definite answer but if they do ask you to defer a year, I wouldn't worry about it. I myself had to take a gap year before starting Med School and it gave me a good chance to take a break and get myself back on track, so it wasn't as bad as I expected at all. Hopefully you won't need to but if you do, just know that it's really not as bad as people think.

    In terms of Med School, OH haven't really seen me much but my tutors have been extremely supportive. I couldn't have asked for better support tbh - my tutor texts me from time to time to make sure I'm ok, and we meet up often to discuss things and how they're going. I was also given mitigating circumstances so that if I failed my exams, I could do a retake as though it were my first attempt. They also gave me the option to take a year out of medicine and come back after a break if I wanted, but I chose not to take this option.

    Basically, make sure you let your tutor know about things as soon as you can, continue to seek help in a professional way as it looks like you're doing already and it should be fine.

    Good luck!*
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    :wavey:

    I can't remember if I thanked you for your reply to my question. So: thank you! :lovehug:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I can't remember if I thanked you for your reply to my question. So: thank you! :lovehug:
    Hahaha, no worries :lovehug:
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    Hey everyone.

    So this thread has mainly been inspired by The_Lonely_Goatherd's Mental Health AMA thread. It's a bit of a continuation to my depressive episode from Sixth Form but I'll keep it very brief.

    As some of you may know, I started Medical School this year after the whole adventure I had during Sixth Form/my gap year and while it started of very well, things got absolutely crazy again during second term and by third term, I found myself admit in a Psychiatric Hospital. My depression was back but this time it was even more severe than last time, and resulted in some psychotic episodes too.

    Basically, I went out for dinner somewhere late at night one day and decided to go for a visit to Lords in London (being a massive cricket fan ). Then before I knew it, something happened that made me insanely upset and led to a very bad psychotic episode. I was then taken in blue lights by an ambulance to the mental health unit of a hospital, where a psychiatrist suggested for me to be admit in a psychiatric hospital for a few days. There were no hospital beds in the whole of London, however, so I was transferred outside of London to a private hospital the next day.

    I stayed there for a few days before I decided to self discharge myself - not because I felt better really, but because I had my first year exams in a few days and I wanted to have a shot at them...

    Anyway, ever since, I can't say I've been at 100% but I've learnt to be way more open about my Mental Health now and want to give the encouragement to others to not be afraid to open up too, should they want to. The stigma is absolute bull****. I started a Mental Health blog (not on TSR) to try to keep myself busy that way and even though it's very early, I'm seriously beginning to think about a career in psychiatry now.

    I've seen many myths circulating around about what happens in a psychiatric hospital, and this seems to put many people off from seeking help in the first place when they need it. So I thought I'd make this thread to answer anyone's questions about what my experiences were like there, or to answer questions about my mental health experiences in general.

    Just as an aside - please keep all questions sensible. I will remove any questions where there is malice intended, and will take appropriate action on those posts. I may also have to remove some posts if they're triggering too, but I won't take any action there if it's not intentional.
    I'm sorry but in medical terms, this shows very limited insight in to your illness! (/condition).
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    (Original post by john2054)
    I'm sorry but in medical terms, this shows very limited insight in to your illness! (/condition).
    It's okay, thanks for the apology :yy:
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    It's okay, thanks for the apology :yy:
    How are you doing now anyway, did you pass your first year?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    How are you doing now anyway, did you pass your first year?
    I've been better, but am slowly trying to make a recovery. I imagine I'll still be under my team for a significant portion of the next year but it'll be for my own good I guess. Yeah, I did.
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    I've been better, but am slowly trying to make a recovery. I imagine I'll still be under my team for a significant portion of the next year but it'll be for my own good I guess. Yeah, I did.
    The fact that they accepted you on a medical degree shows a great degree in itself. What do you want to do after it?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    The fact that they accepted you on a medical degree shows a great degree in itself. What do you want to do after it?
    That's kind of you to say - thanks.

    Well, I hope to become some kind of doctor afterwards (I'm not really into the academic/research side much). Psychiatry is tempting given this experience, and how much it's made me hate mental health disorders. I really would hate for anyone to go through them. But it's way too early for me to pin down a speciality just yet - we'll see in a few years eh?
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    That's kind of you to say - thanks.

    Well, I hope to become some kind of doctor afterwards (I'm not really into the academic/research side much). Psychiatry is tempting given this experience, and how much it's made me hate mental health disorders. I really would hate for anyone to go through them. But it's way too early for me to pin down a speciality just yet - we'll see in a few years eh?
    Sure try to get to any conferences you can, and i can recommend some good books on mental health, if you are interested in reading them? If you have time alongside your degree i mean?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Sure try to get to any conferences you can, and i can recommend some good books on mental health, if you are interested in reading them? If you have time alongside your degree i mean?
    If you'd have the time, go for it! I am very interested in the topic.
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    Read Paris Williams Rethinking Madness, great book very well written and comprehensive, providing insight from a psychological perspective, also there is another one, hold on i am going to have to find it....
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rethinking-...paris+williamsa prescription for psychiatryP. Kindermanhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    This second book is written from a medical 'anti-psychiatric' perspective. And I have only read the first few chapters or so, but it is still a great read, and antidote to the professional nonsense they teach us in school!

    Good luckx

    PS search Szasz https://www.amazon.co.uk/Myth-Mental...mental+illness

    and RD Laing,https://www.amazon.co.uk/Divided-Sel...words=rd+laing

    if you want to see the origins of anti psychiatry, and although these two psychiatrists have been heavily criticised since their protege, they are still the bedrock of this movement. Also Robert Whittaker's Anatomy of an Epidemic, for the prespective of a well read American journalist.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anatomy-Epi...obert+whitaker

    I have read all of these books, with the exception of Szasz's and i will swear by them. I would recommend you read them too, if you are serious about this issue that is?

    PS sorry if i have been a long time, i had to find the amazon links! x
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Read Paris Williams Rethinking Madness, great book very well written and comprehensive, providing insight from a psychological perspective, also there is another one, hold on i am going to have to find it....
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rethinking-...paris+williamsa prescription for psychiatryP. Kindermanhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    This second book is written from a medical 'anti-psychiatric' perspective. And I have only read the first few chapters or so, but it is still a great read, and antidote to the professional nonsense they teach us in school!

    Good luckx

    PS search Szasz https://www.amazon.co.uk/Myth-Mental...mental+illness

    and RD Laing,https://www.amazon.co.uk/Divided-Sel...words=rd+laing

    if you want to see the origins of anti psychiatry, and although these two psychiatrists have been heavily criticised since their protege, they are still the bedrock of this movement. Also Robert Whittaker's Anatomy of an Epidemic, for the prespective of a well read American journalist.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anatomy-Epi...obert+whitaker

    I have read all of these books, with the exception of Szasz's and i will swear by them. I would recommend you read them too, if you are serious about this issue that is?

    PS sorry if i have been a long time, i had to find the amazon links! x
    Thanks man - I'll be sure to have a look into them
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    Hi,
    I think it I great what you are doing, I have been in hospital in total for 1yr and 10months a small amount of that was in adult... I don't know if I missed something but were you in adult or a camhs unit?
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    Hi usycool1!
    It's really great and inspiring to see you share this experience with us.
    What was the experience like with the Psychiatrists and other med professionals?
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    (Original post by beehall)
    Hi,
    I think it I great what you are doing, I have been in hospital in total for 1yr and 10months a small amount of that was in adult... I don't know if I missed something but were you in adult or a camhs unit?
    Hey!

    Thanks, and I'm sorry to hear that you've been in hospital. I hope you're doing a bit better now.

    I was in an adult unit - never been in a camhs unit.
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    (Original post by umar39)
    Hi usycool1!
    It's really great and inspiring to see you share this experience with us.
    What was the experience like with the Psychiatrists and other med professionals?
    Hey! Thanks

    For me, the psychiatrists were absolutely wonderful (both with the NHS and privately). They seemed to be very empathic with me and seemed to be very interested in what I wanted to say. At a time where I felt like no one was interested in me or my opinions, that really did help. It was a bit strange originally when my GP said that she'd refer me to a psychiatrist, because I had no idea what to expect. Not only that, but I wasn't sure how I'd tell people that I was going to be seeing a psychiatrist, given the stigma attached!

    In terms of the other professionals, the GPs were hit and miss really. I had some very good ones who were very understanding of how I felt, referred me for things like therapy and would call me up from time to time to arrange telephone consultations with me to make sure I was ok. There were other GPs, however, who just seemed annoyed at me for going and seemed to want to get rid of me ASAP. I remember when I wanted to get a repeat prescription for my meds and was also hearing voices, I told the GP about the latter and he was just like: "Oh OK. Well, I'm going to print these prescriptions for you now and then you can go" so that the appointment lasted literally about 4 minutes.*

    Don't get me wrong, I do understand that GPs are under an insane amount of pressure to see patients within 10 minutes, get all referrals etc. sorted but from a patient perspective, that's what I think.*

    Otherwise, I met some amazing nurses and HCAs too. They were lovely to chat to and I remember once when I was in tears about something, this nurse gave me a hell of a nice pep talk and that really did help me. I don't think I had any bad experiences with any of the nurses or HCAs.*

    My home treatment team are decent but again, slightly hit and miss with some. I think it's a bit unhelpful having different people see you each session but I imagine it must be difficult for them to arrange otherwise.
    *
    I think I'm quite lucky in that I seemed to have quite a positive experience overall, however.
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    Hey!

    Thanks, and I'm sorry to hear that you've been in hospital. I hope you're doing a bit better now.

    I was in an adult unit - never been in a camhs unit.
    Ahh ok. I used to be annoyed and thought I had wasted two years of my life in hospital.. But I honestly wouldn't be who I am now, and I have made the greatest most understanding friends ever! I spent time in a PICU too which really opened my eyes. I found the adult unit I was in very boring. It was NHS and they didn't really do much.. I looked forward to meal times because it was pretty much the only thing going on where I was. CAMHS units, private and NHS have a lot more going on. How are you doing now?
 
 
 
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