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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    This sense of entitlement is hilarious. Why do you deserve a certain lifestyle?

    Jobs are 50% luck anyways. I know people starting in consulting on £100k who would wonder what the hell you did wrong. Equally there's nothing "pathetic" about earning less. You've been luckier than some.
    ?? What consulting firm pays £100k starting to an undergrad? Sounds bogus to me

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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    This sense of entitlement is hilarious. Why do you deserve a certain lifestyle?

    Jobs are 50% luck anyways. I know people starting in consulting on £100k who would wonder what the hell you did wrong. Equally there's nothing "pathetic" about earning less. You've been luckier than some.
    There's no way you know anyone starting on £100k in consultancy. I've never seen any graduate job that pays £100k first year


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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    You said speak for myself but that you also agree? The lack of value was my point really.

    All the materials etc. isn't that valuable, and professors time isn't worth 9k to you.

    3k, sure... Even still, is a lot of money between a class; the average if I remember correctly is around the ballpark of £30-40 per lecture... and that's before the rise to 9k...
    The speak for yourself bit was regarding it only being a library pass

    I was in around 20 hours of lectures and labs a week, so around 600 over the course of a year? That's only around £5 a lecture?

    Looking at the current value of gold I used at least a couple of hundred pounds of that alone. Some of the more basic metals and chemicals to go with it probably came to another few hundred. God knows what the more specialised organic compounds value was.

    Even at £9k the value of that could be argued, although I agree it gets tighter. My point is sure, some degrees are bad value, but even ignoring the value of "the experience" (I went to three different sports clubs that I've carried on after uni. Outside of uni they were around £5 a session. That's another ~£500 a year) some actually aren't half bad. I'm just grateful for all the humanities students who paid the same and got 6 hours a week with no resources, because they basically funded my degree.
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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    There's no way you know anyone starting on £100k in consultancy. I've never seen any graduate job that pays £100k first year

    They have a masters and are a year or two in.

    Believe me or don't, makes little difference to me, just trying to contribute some information to the thread.
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    Should've picked STEM.


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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    They have a masters and are a year or two in.

    Believe me or don't, makes little difference to me, just trying to contribute some information to the thread.
    Unless that 'masters' was an MBA, and they had 3-5 years prior experience and they're working for top strategy firm, it's BS.

    Not even many entry level bankers hit £100k comfortably after 1-2 years

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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    The speak for yourself bit was regarding it only being a library pass

    I was in around 20 hours of lectures and labs a week, so around 600 over the course of a year? That's only around £5 a lecture?

    Looking at the current value of gold I used at least a couple of hundred pounds of that alone. Some of the more basic metals and chemicals to go with it probably came to another few hundred. God knows what the more specialised organic compounds value was.

    Even at £9k the value of that could be argued, although I agree it gets tighter. My point is sure, some degrees are bad value, but even ignoring the value of "the experience" (I went to three different sports clubs that I've carried on after uni. Outside of uni they were around £5 a session. That's another ~£500 a year) some actually aren't half bad. I'm just grateful for all the humanities students who paid the same and got 6 hours a week with no resources, because they basically funded my degree.
    Then perhaps yours is one of the few where the value is good; in that you were given your moneys worth as the cost inherent within your area is high.

    But as you say, for many things that value is not so great.

    Perhaps my calculation was at masters level, maybe I'm just going crazy! But maybe would still stand - as there are extremely long holidays, such as summer etc. and exam periods where there are no or few lectures.

    A few hundred pounds of stuff provided to you here and there would be value at 3k, agreed - but def not at 9k
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Unless that 'masters' was an MBA, and they had 3-5 years prior experience and they're working for top strategy firm, it's BS.

    Not even many entry level bankers hit £100k comfortably after 1-2 years
    Lots of internships and good connections does wonders from what I gather, along with a giant steaming heap of luck. No MBA though.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Lots of internships and good connections does wonders from what I gather, along with a giant steaming heap of luck. No MBA though.
    Internships are a minimum doesn't affect salary or expected total comp in the slightest. The highest paid consulting grad I know works for a top 3 firm and is making ~£50-60k 2 years in. £100k is either made up or he's working for an obscure tiny firm.

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    too many people go to university and lots of them do mickey mouse degrees
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    (Original post by hellodave5)

    A few hundred pounds of stuff provided to you here and there would be value at 3k, agreed - but def not at 9k
    If you actually went through and carefully added it all up I don't think £9k is that ridiculous. I don't know exactly what paperwork you need to get some of the chemicals we used in those quantities but I doubt it's that easy. Simple things such as the vacuum chamber easily gets into the tens of thousands of pounds (the glass dome alone is a fair few hundred) chemical cupboards, god knows how much glassware. This is all just for my dissertation. Normal practicals included everything from radioactive samples to high powered lasers to specialist telescopes. Use of a super computer, even use or normal computing suites considering the cost of the program licences. Not sure where else I could use all this stuff and buying it would cost a ridiculous amount.

    Then you get to all the smaller stuff; the union facilities you can use, the free bus travel, the bursaries for sports tournaments and equipment.

    There are definitely degrees that aren't anywhere near worth it though, I agree with you there. I just think some people underestimate how much STEM subjects actually use.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Internships are a minimum doesn't affect salary or expected total comp in the slightest. The highest paid consulting grad I know works for a top 3 firm and is making ~£50-60k 2 years in. £100k is either made up or he's working for an obscure tiny firm.

    Meh, think what you like. It's not for a dedicated consulting firm, but a consulting job within an organisation. And do your internships with the right people and it can help more than others.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Meh, think what you like. It's not for a dedicated consulting firm, but a consulting job within an organisation. And do your internships with the right people and it can help more than others.
    Ahh, so contracting? Fair enough.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Ahh, so contracting? Fair enough.

    I wouldn't call it contracting. They're employed by an organisation to do consulting for said organisation. If that's what counts as contracting in the consulting world then fair enough, my mistake. I looked at it once upon a time but not something I personally have any experience with.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    I wouldn't call it contracting. They're employed by an organisation to do consulting for said organisation. If that's what counts as contracting in the consulting world then fair enough, my mistake. I looked at it once upon a time but not something I personally have any experience with.
    Sounds like corporate strategy/in-house consulting tbh, not sure what the pay is like there but it still feels high ish.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I agree careers advice in this country is a complete and utter shambles. So many posts on TSR show that by themselves. I heard someone once say that STEM degrees are a way to riches - being fully serious - when engineers and scientists have lower than expected salaries.I wouldn't look at your course average, what matters is your job/industry's average. Others on your course might be doing something completely unrelated to your current job - which I guess is another issue, people using course salary averages as benchmarks.Posted from TSR Mobile
    Agreed. Although the info is out there though it's just not coming out of the mouths of the right people. I think a more grounded think for people to be saying is STEM degrees might give you an edge in the market.The Community Manager average on glassdoor is 29k with the max being 41k. So 24k may be crap to some people but it's actually ok within the context of the job role.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Sounds like corporate strategy/in-house consulting tbh, not sure what the pay is like there but it still feels high ish.

    Fair enough. Well if I ever backtrack and decide I want to consider a consulting career again I'll make sure that's what I aim for

    Like I say, in this case looking at it from the outside it was luck, but chances are they don't realise just quite how much and would look at someone on £40k wondering what that person did wrong.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    If you actually went through and carefully added it all up I don't think £9k is that ridiculous. I don't know exactly what paperwork you need to get some of the chemicals we used in those quantities but I doubt it's that easy. Simple things such as the vacuum chamber easily gets into the tens of thousands of pounds (the glass dome alone is a fair few hundred) chemical cupboards, god knows how much glassware. This is all just for my dissertation. Normal practicals included everything from radioactive samples to high powered lasers to specialist telescopes. Use of a super computer, even use or normal computing suites considering the cost of the program licences. Not sure where else I could use all this stuff and buying it would cost a ridiculous amount.

    Then you get to all the smaller stuff; the union facilities you can use, the free bus travel, the bursaries for sports tournaments and equipment.

    There are definitely degrees that aren't anywhere near worth it though, I agree with you there. I just think some people underestimate how much STEM subjects actually use.
    Thanks for the insight.

    It would seem that physics or material science or whatever it is, is very expensive, in which there is a lot of practical content with expensive substances and methodologies.

    But I wouldn't have thought that would be the case with pretty much almost all other courses.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    They have a masters and are a year or two in.

    Believe me or don't, makes little difference to me, just trying to contribute some information to the thread.
    So they aren't 'starting' on £100k


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    So they aren't 'starting' on £100k

    I'd class someone a year into a career as starting that career. Clearly you use a stricter definition.
 
 
 
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