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Feel like students are very negative about jobs after university?!

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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Oh wow that is tough, I would definitley prepare a good comeback on that stating actually I have been employed and I've been doing x x and x. I volunteered from June 2015 until a few weeks ago and not once in the 8 interviews did the fact I wasn't in a paid role come up (it clearly said volunteer on my cv). The only person who was funny about it was a lady from a recruitment agency, actual employers weren't bothered.
    i had an interviewer who actually said 'Oh well you don't have any real work experience, but apart from that a great interview'..... I had to explain I'd worked for domino's for two years while in six form 30+ hours a week, worked meat and fish counter in tesco for a year, then worked in a complaint department for a bank for a year, then worked in pubs and a jewellery shop while at uni. All the while doing work experience in various offices and HR departments....

    The response I got, 'ahhh but no real life experience then?' weirdly enough my best experiences were the opposite of yours, recruitment agencies usually take note and always hammer it home to potential employers, they just don't seem to listen.
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    Yeah, tell me how working in mackies at the age of 16 will help me get my VS or a TC.
    Universities themselves provide students with lots of advice and work experience opportunities that some students can't be arsed to take, but those who take are at a huge advantage.
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    If you drive, not being able to find voluntary work related to your studies is an impossibility...

    From sorting clothes in a charity shop, serving homeless people meals, setting up IT equipment for the blind, helping in numerous theatre clubs for children, doing school runs for disabled parents, working at citizens advice, promoting charities in shopping centres, helping out at local youth clubs, helping out at the local animal shelter/charity .....

    The list is endless and will compliment your CV by helping to bridge the experience gap your CV's have.
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    (Original post by BIGJohnson777)
    Yeah, tell me how working in mackies at the age of 16 will help me get my VS or a TC.

    Correct. It's a really silly idea.
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    (Original post by DanB1991)
    i had an interviewer who actually said 'Oh well you don't have any real work experience, but apart from that a great interview'..... I had to explain I'd worked for domino's for two years while in six form 30+ hours a week, worked meat and fish counter in tesco for a year, then worked in a complaint department for a bank for a year, then worked in pubs and a jewellery shop while at uni. All the while doing work experience in various offices and HR departments....

    The response I got, 'ahhh but no real life experience then?' weirdly enough my best experiences were the opposite of yours, recruitment agencies usually take note and always hammer it home to potential employers, they just don't seem to listen.
    Wow, the attitude of that employer stinks.
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    The youth of today are so lazy that is why.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    The youth of today are so lazy that is why.
    Not really, it's the opposite there are just so many competition for jobs and automation has taken away many jobs. 20 years ago a 16 year old kid could walk into an office jobs that doesn't happen anymore because there are many qualified and older people taking the entry level jobs instead
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    (Original post by dom2375)
    optimism is narcissistic, and unrealistic.
    lalalalalalalala i can't hear you over my boundless optimism
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    (Original post by Jee1)
    Not really, it's the opposite there are just so many competition for jobs and automation has taken away many jobs. 20 years ago a 16 year old kid could walk into an office jobs that doesn't happen anymore because there are many qualified and older people taking the entry level jobs instead
    Are you implying that a young student has more of a right than a mature student for a graduate position??
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    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    But seriously, its pretty dire right now for young people:

    - Job security non existant for many
    - Unpayed internships and similar extortion normal
    - Huge mass of similarly qualified individuals with little real training/skills
    - Zero hours contracts and shift work common
    - Income levels stagnant for years
    - Much much harder to buy a house then our parents/grandparents
    - Likely to retire much later
    - More likely to rent for longer
    - Having babies older
    - Marrying less
    - More likely to have to live with our parents

    top it all off with
    - First generation since records began that are forcast to earn less over the course of their lives then their parents did..

    So yeah, life on average is pretty tough out there for a 20 something who aims to lead an adult life..

    All you can do is work harder, think smarter, be better then the average 20 something, and try and avoid the mess many are falling into..
    True

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    (Original post by BIGJohnson777)
    Yeah, tell me how working in mackies at the age of 16 will help me get my VS or a TC.
    Tbf part time work is in my opinion why I've secured a TC. Working since 16 is the one way I really stand out, obviously I have the good grades but so does everyone.

    I've worked in bars, and now supervise a bar, which in reality is the same as working in McDonalds. There's no reason why you can't make comparisons between dealing with difficult customers and law firms dealing with clients.

    I've had to settle arguments, deal with complaints, manage expectations, work in a team, manage my time efficiently etc. and all of those competencies help applications.


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    (Original post by Conzy210)
    Tbf part time work is in my opinion why I've secured a TC. Working since 16 is the one way I really stand out, obviously I have the good grades but so does everyone.

    I've worked in bars, and now supervise a bar, which in reality is the same as working in McDonalds. There's no reason why you can't make comparisons between dealing with difficult customers and law firms dealing with clients.

    I've had to settle arguments, deal with complaints, manage expectations, work in a team, manage my time efficiently etc. and all of those competencies help applications.


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    Herein lies the stepping stone qualities of entry level jobs - extracting the transferable skills and selling them in pursuit of positions in line with your degree qualification.

    Bemoaning how hard this generation has it is not going to gain a graduate position. The woes of this generation are not insurmountable.
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    Started work in retail the moment I was 16, went through college and got my a levels, decided to do an apprenticeship in the field I want to work in. Did that for a year alongside my part time retail job. Went to uni to study the subject I want to work in, graduated. Still all the while in my retail job. Can't even get an interview in the field I worked in and got a degree in.

    Going crazy trying to find a job. Its hard!
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    (Original post by DaisyPop32)
    Started work in retail the moment I was 16, went through college and got my a levels, decided to do an apprenticeship in the field I want to work in. Did that for a year alongside my part time retail job. Went to uni to study the subject I want to work in, graduated. Still all the while in my retail job. Can't even get an interview in the field I worked in and got a degree in.

    Going crazy trying to find a job. Its hard!
    Yes I have also been turned down, or not heard back from loads of jobs.
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    Tbh people have a reason to be pessimistic.

    I'm a First Class Oxford grad, did several voluntary/leadership positions with societies at university, and did a short term internship during the summer of my second year, and worked in a job managing younger international students during some university vacations. I have just come out of one graduate internship (at a very respectful organisation) into another because I wasn't able to secure a paid job. I'm now applying to graduate schemes but am having to keep re-building my self confidence each time I get a rejection - and worry that despite all the work I have put in to get impressive credentials, I will still be unable to find a graduate-level job after I finish my current internship.

    My current internship is unpaid - luckily I've worked enough during university to pay for travel costs, and my parents live 1.5 hours from the office in London, so it's feasible to commute. I'm also taking on tutoring work when I can to try to minimize the money loss I'm making having to work unpaid since my parents can't afford to financially support me other than letting me live in their house for free (and many graduates don't even have this advantage).

    It doesn't make it easier when I have older generations telling me that the reason I can't get a job is because I'm not trying...
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    Tbh people have a reason to be pessimistic. I'm a First Class Oxford grad, did several voluntary/leadership positions with societies at university, and did a short term internship during the summer of my second year. I have just started my second graduate internship because even with this I wasn't able to get a job after my first internship (at a very respectful organisation). I'm now applying to graduate schemes but am having to keep re-building my self confidence each time I get a rejection - and worry that despite all the work I have put in to get impressive credentials, I will still be unable to find a graduate-level job after I finish my current internship. It doesn't make it easier when I have older generations telling me that the reason I can't get a job is because I'm not trying...
    Is it graduate level position or nothing? How about entering your chosen career slightly below graduate level, to get your foot in the door and demonstrate competency in your chosen field (which you do not mention as one of your achievements), then swiftly progress through the ranks due to having excellent qualifications to back up proven practice. I don't see any of the pessimistic post graduates saying that they have attempted this, yet I have seen this method successfully put into practice.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    Is it graduate level position or nothing? How about entering your chosen career slightly below graduate level, to get your foot in the door and demonstrate competency in your chosen field (which you do not mention as one of your achievements), then swiftly progress through the ranks due to having excellent qualifications to back up proven practice. I don't see any of the pessimistic post graduates saying that they have attempted this, yet I have seen this method successfully put into practice.
    I am taking a below graduate level job - an unpaid internship which I hope to be able to get an entry-level job at the organisation with. In my case it's very disheartening that the 'below graduate level' is not even a paid job...

    At the moment I'm applying to both entry level and graduate schemes (sorry I didn't mention this). But it can't be hard to see how it's disheartening for graduates, who throughout school were bombarded with the advantages of a degree, to leave with 50k worth of debt and still having to apply for jobs they would have been qualified for at school - hence why a graduate-level role is the ideal
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    I am taking a below graduate level job - an unpaid internship which I hope to be able to get an entry-level job at the organisation with. In my case it's very disheartening that the 'below graduate level' is not even a paid job...

    At the moment I'm applying to both entry level and graduate schemes (sorry I didn't mention this). But it can't be hard to see how it's disheartening for graduates, who throughout school were bombarded with the advantages of a degree, to leave with 50k worth of debt and still having to apply for jobs they would have been qualified for at school - hence why a graduate-level role is the ideal
    I still do not have the violins out playing a mournful tune. Yes, the high-achieving graduate may have to apply for a position they would have been qualified to do straight out of college. But they are still advantaged in that they have the opportunity to progress way beyond that position. Whereas without a degree level qualification other employees are stuck at the low paid entry level job and have a lifetime of juggling those meagre funds to maintain a household and family. Tell me again why I am supposed to feel sorry for graduates kicking about waiting for university prestige/degree classification related pay?
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    I am taking a below graduate level job - an unpaid internship which I hope to be able to get an entry-level job at the organisation with. In my case it's very disheartening that the 'below graduate level' is not even a paid job...

    At the moment I'm applying to both entry level and graduate schemes (sorry I didn't mention this). But it can't be hard to see how it's disheartening for graduates, who throughout school were bombarded with the advantages of a degree, to leave with 50k worth of debt and still having to apply for jobs they would have been qualified for at school - hence why a graduate-level role is the ideal
    What degree did you do?
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    (Original post by ElsMoll)
    I dont know about what you think but I feel like people are so desperate and negative about life in general after uni. Hard to find an intership, hard to find a job if whatever your subject, or if you havent got a 2:1 or more, hard to find a "well paid" job in your chosen area (ending up in retail). I feel confused sometimes because after if you say I will go straight to work, aprentenship after A-level, people say it's hard to get a job/ employer.
    Since the 21th century really has begun the youth mood has gone down and down I feel. Is it just an big impression or is everybody negative towards this society, feeling lile they have got no future?
    im a first year student and im not worried about job after uni mostly because im not looking at getting employed, working on a project to make me secured in life in 2 years time
 
 
 
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