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Why would anyone want to be a doctor when they could be a trader? Watch

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I do ahahahaha. I have £25k diversified atm, and £2k to punt around.

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    woah... did you invest it yourself?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I make a lot more than that by going to work for 4 weeks... Could make it in 2-3 locum shifts if I wanted to do the extra hours.

    The point isn't about how much personal money I "could" make though, it's about why you would choose to be a doctor vs being a trader. And I am quite happy to admit that I don't have the skills or interest to be a proper City girl - but playing with your £20K isn't that either.
    Yes, but I made that money doing nothing. And you can't compare yourself to making more than a successful trader.

    One stock, Interserve (FTSE 250 listed), I made 33% return in 4 weeks, £670 in 4 weeks for doing nothing.

    2-3 locum shifts won't pay £1500
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    how about working in b and q on minimum wage as you can't achieve anything better?
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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    Where have you put it? Let's see how amazing you are?
    Mostly in various ETFs (Vanguad, FTSE trackers, commodities trackers), cba actively managing it.

    As for the £2k, I have a decent amount in GOOGL (+17% from when I bought it in July), some of it in oil (bought at $29/bbl), some of it in recent M&A plays (e.g. Starwood acquisition), lost a few bucks in AAPL because I went long at the wrong time..



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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Mostly in various ETFs (Vanguad, FTSE trackers, commodities trackers), cba actively managing it.

    As for the £2k, I have a decent amount in GOOGL (+17% from when I bought it in July), some of it in oil (bought at $29/bbl), some of it in recent M&A plays (e.g. Starwood acquisition), lost a few bucks in AAPL because I went long at the wrong time..



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    Don't over-diversify in with ETFs, they hold so much crappy stuff like banks

    You should be buying based on P/E ratio, dividend yield and dividend cover (this is your margin of safety). Google is still valued too much right now on P/E metrics, I sense a pullback.

    You want a good buy right now....

    Go and buy some Interserve (FTSE 250), Galliford Try (FTSE 250) and Easyjet (FTSE 100)
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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    Don't over-diversify in with ETFs, they hold so much crappy stuff like banks

    You should be buying based on P/E ratio, dividend yield and dividend cover (this is your margin of safety). Google is still valued too much right now on P/E metrics, I sense a pullback.

    You want a good buy right now....

    Go and buy some Interserve (FTSE 250), Galliford Try (FTSE 250) and Easyjet (FTSE 100)
    There are different ways to invest man, not all about using multiples sometimes you have to be opportunistic..

    I'll look into it, but EasyJet imo is a pretty shaky company - not sure if I'd really want to put money there.

    Google is on an uptrend, doubt there'll be much to push it down - at least not for the next few months.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    There are different ways to invest man, not all about using multiples sometimes you have to be opportunistic..

    I'll look into it, but EasyJet imo is a pretty shaky company - not sure if I'd really want to put money there.

    Google is on an uptrend, doubt there'll be much to push it down - at least not for the next few months.

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    You need to buying on P/E, it is the best metric, other than PEG ratio (but that is a different story).

    Think of P/E like this, something with a high P/E like ABF (the owners of primark) have to perform so much better for their stock to rise, because a lot of earnings have been priced into the stock.

    So easyjet can do ok and the stock price will rise. It's just a cheap stock that is undervalued. I know the company is not great, but they still make money and that stock will return 50-60% in the next year for sure.

    Now holding onto these stocks is another question, ABF might perform better in the super long run, but for the next 2-3 years their stock price won't grow as much (unless primark really does deliver)
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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    You need to buying on P/E, it is the best metric, other than PEG ratio (but that is a different story).

    Think of P/E like this, something with a high P/E like ABF (the owners of primark) how to perform so much better for their stock to rise, because a lot of earnings have been priced into the stock.

    So easyjet can do ok and the stock price will rise. It's just a cheap stock that is undervalued. I know the company is not great, but they still make money and that stock will return 50-60% in the next year for sure.

    Now holding onto these stocks is another question, ABF might perform better in the super long run, but for the next 2-3 years their stock price won't grow as much (unless primark really does deliver)
    Are you seriously acting like hot **** after having made <10% lifetime? An amount that a pretty normal swing could send down the *****er, no matter how good your strat is?
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Are you seriously acting like hot **** after having made <10% lifetime? An amount that a pretty normal swing could send down the *****er, no matter how good your strat is?
    I'd like to see you make £1500 in 4 weeks, without leverage.
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    Simple argument is that being a doctor usually requires passion in helping people. That's true, then again many people study medicine for different reasons.

    To become a hedge fund manager you can set this up at home, you can study actuarial science at uni for 3-4 years and still land a job in the city. It's guaranteed you'll be making a stable income between 50k-100k within 2 years because of market fluctuations.

    People saying that your job will not be stable are lying to theirselves. With that experience you can literally transfer into any kind of employment across the world.

    I don't like seeing the sight of people's blood, dealing with infectious people unless it's someone close to me. If you want to be a doctor fair enough - don't stop yourself. I encourage more doctors anyway to start from here.

    I don't see the point to financially drain myself for nearly 10 years just to earn 30k and worry about the debt for most of my working life. On top of that some may want to become private practitioners to its not always the great picture of carrying out civil duties for everyone in society.NHS is not doing great at all and statistics simply backs that up.
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    (Original post by Dnkz7)
    Simple argument is that being a doctor usually requires passion in helping people. That's true, then again many people study medicine for different reasons.

    To become a hedge fund manager you can set this up at home, you can study actuarial science at uni for 3-4 years and still land a job in the city. It's guaranteed you'll be making a stable income between 50k-100k within 2 years because of market fluctuations.

    People saying that your job will not be stable are lying to theirselves. With that experience you can literally transfer into any kind of employment across the world.

    I don't like seeing the sight of people's blood, dealing with infectious people unless it's someone close to me. If you want to be a doctor fair enough - don't stop yourself. I encourage more doctors anyway to start from here.

    I don't see the point to financially drain myself for nearly 10 years just to earn 30k and worry about the debt for most of my working life. On top of that some may want to become private practitioners to its not always the great picture of carrying out civil duties for everyone in society.NHS is not doing great at all and statistics simply backs that up.
    ????????

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Mostly in various ETFs (Vanguad, FTSE trackers, commodities trackers), cba actively managing it.

    As for the £2k, I have a decent amount in GOOGL (+17% from when I bought it in July), some of it in oil (bought at $29/bbl), some of it in recent M&A plays (e.g. Starwood acquisition), lost a few bucks in AAPL because I went long at the wrong time..



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    The money that you put in ETFs, what's the return been like?
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    (Original post by Dnkz7)
    To become a hedge fund manager you can set this up at home, you can study actuarial science at uni for 3-4 years and still land a job in the city. It's guaranteed you'll be making a stable income between 50k-100k within 2 years because of market fluctuations.

    are you high
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    Google P/E ratio is around 30
    DJIA has averaged 17

    Google is trading expensive, so the market expects a lot from it to just maintain its stock price. Actually the worst culprit right now is Amazon which is trading on insane multiples, I would short Amazon right now.

    Best to buy stocks when P/E is trading below the market average (gives you some margin of safety if you are wrong).

    High P/E stocks can correct a lot and it could take 3-4 years before you see any profit.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    ????????

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    In case you were not aware https://www.theguardian.com/money/20...unds.investing
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    (Original post by Ladbants)
    The money that you put in ETFs, what's the return been like?
    Been alright, ~8% aggregate.

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    (Original post by Ladbants)
    are you high
    What's your point? Are you even one to begin with. If not then you can't really say anything...
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    My lecturer at QMUL had his own hedgefund. So you are right!

    He taught part time in the evenings and did some crazy stuff with futures for the rest of the week. I don't even think they were futures, must have been something exotic.
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    The whole paragraph made 0 sense whatsoever. Actuarial Science? 50-100k? hedge fund manager directly after uni?

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Been alright, ~8% aggregate.

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    Why no 33% in 4 weeks!

    This is why I hate ETFs (the majority), unless you want exposure to India (then yes, because I don't understand the companies there).

    The companies losing you money right now are the miners and the banks, don't hold them. And the gold companies, they will get battered now and rightly so, we are in a bull market not a market crash!
 
 
 
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