Recording Uni Lectures

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    (Original post by Gman786)
    Time of the month?
    You are the atrocity of evil!!!! Never seen someone so cheap! go buy some guts!!! and no it's not!!
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Great post. Loving the indignation.

    Its better to make good notes during the lecture imo, its what all the smart students did. People tend not to have time to go through it all again and recording cna make you lazy. You will soon know anyway based on your results.

    Btw its a public forum. You posted a thread and people can post their opinion, however much you want to protest they cant.
    You don't seem to understand public forums have rules. You will be reminded of them once someone reports you. People can't say whatever they want, especially not in an incredibly offensive and crude way like that guy did. His posts will be reported.
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    (Original post by 571122)
    You don't seem to understand public forums have rules. You will be reminded of them once someone reports you. People can't say whatever they want, especially not in an incredibly offensive and crude way like that guy did. His posts will be reported.
    So where have I broken the rules?
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    (Original post by trustmeimlying1)
    Very keen. Doubt many actually use them.

    Sounds right to me.
    I haven't said anything about watching it back! The entire time I have been saying listening to it back.
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    (Original post by Chochiana)
    Are we allowed to record lecturers? (I don't openly want ask them just to avoid accidental wrong impressions but most importantly judgmental people, keeping it to myself will be much easier)

    Are we allowed mobile phones and laptops out on the tables in the lecture room during lectures?Thank you!
    Yes!

    But you probably wont be consistent with this

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    Guys so now I am getting Personal Messages from that teaser
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    (Original post by nerdling_CompSci)
    Yes!

    But you probably wont be consistent with this

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    I have been consistent in the past I will be again
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Doesnt tend to happen and whats wrong with just copying or checking with your friends on the bit that was missed?
    With me it tends to happen. Sometimes in between those friends you can always find rivals so sometimes it is good to find a way yourself to fix things and not always rely on friends. Twenty first century is a challenging time and the more we learn to deal on our own for most of the time the better we will be.
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    So when do exams and projects and coursework start, let's just say when do lecturers start grading students? Will it be calm and relaxing until after the Christmas Holidays or would I have had few assignments by then?
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    (Original post by Chochiana)
    So when do exams and projects and coursework start, let's just say when do lecturers start grading students? Will it be calm and relaxing until after the Christmas Holidays or would I have had few assignments by then?
    Depends entirely on your course. Some have exams at the end of each term. And possibly assessed coursework at regular intervals.
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    (Original post by Chochiana)
    Have students ever recorded or would I be the first ever inventor of that idea?
    It's not like they will notice that I am recording though.
    It's pretty standard at my uni. It's seen as polite to email the lecturer in advance to ask, but nobody has ever refused. As an undergrad, around one-third of my cohort were dyslexic, dyspraxic etc., so it was just accepted. People take notes on laptops or phones as well.
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    Recording lectures is a complete waste of time, in my view, unless there's dyslexia or dyspraxia involved. Listening back and transcribing takes 4-5 times as long as the "live" content, and audio transcription software still leaves a huge amount of material that needs editing.

    Just listen, watch the visual material (which isn't captured in any case by audio, obviously), and take notes.
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    If I do rubbish in exams or coursework or any kind of grading material can I re-sit it/re-take it without repeating the year?
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    My old university automatically recorded all lectures for us to listen to later.

    I can't really see it being a problem to record it yourself if you ask first!
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    (Original post by Chochiana)
    Are we allowed to record lecturers? (I don't openly want ask them just to avoid accidental wrong impressions but most importantly judgmental people, keeping it to myself will be much easier)

    Are we allowed mobile phones and laptops out on the tables in the lecture room during lectures?Thank you!
    Before the lecture starts and the lecturer is setting up his laptop etc, quickly have a word with him if you can record. Many people did it during my first year using those voice recorders, didn't see anyone use video tbf
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    If I do rubbish in exams or coursework or any kind of grading material can I re-sit it/re-take it without repeating the year?
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    (Original post by Chochiana)
    If I do rubbish in exams or coursework or any kind of grading material can I re-sit it/re-take it without repeating the year?
    Every uni can set its own rules, so you need to look them up for yours. Sometimes decisions are made on a case-by-case basis.

    At my current uni the usual first option is to offer a resit (exam failure) or resubmission (coursework failure). If you fail the resit/resubmission, then you would probably be required to retake that unit the following year. However there are variations. Being very near a pass mark might mean the Exam Board gives you a compensated pass so you don't need to retake the unit. Failing three or more units would probably mean retaking the entire year from scratch - even those units passed on the first attempt. There can be conditions involved as well. If you fail a unit or year and you didn't tend to turn up to lectures/seminars etc., then you can have your attendance formally monitored and be withdrawn from the course if it drops below a set threshold.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Every uni can set its own rules, so you need to look them up for yours. Sometimes decisions are made on a case-by-case basis.

    At my current uni the usual first option is to offer a resit (exam failure) or resubmission (coursework failure). If you fail the resit/resubmission, then you would probably be required to retake that unit the following year. However there are variations. Being very near a pass mark might mean the Exam Board gives you a compensated pass so you don't need to retake the unit. Failing three or more units would probably mean retaking the entire year from scratch - even those units passed on the first attempt. There can be conditions involved as well. If you fail a unit or year and you didn't tend to turn up to lectures/seminars etc., then you can have your attendance formally monitored and be withdrawn from the course if it drops below a set threshold.
    I go to lessons even when I am ill so unless I am for the hospital bed 10000% I am in lessons. It is only to do if I happen to not do so well on any grading material.
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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    I'm going to be recording it on my phone but not actually filming them
    I suggest trying to rather concentrate on the lecture and so you don't have to waste time listening to it all over again.
    I'm recording because it I miss what they say, and I didn't have time to write it down, I'll go back to that specific point in the recording.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    People overestimate what they can actually do at the same time (multitask). Taking notes straight for an hour (or two) is not easy, and you don't take any of the lecture in at the same time. So if you are a note taker, reasons for which are beyond me, then you will need to at least review your notes again and that's if you have not missed anything, because if you have you will need to watch/listen (to) the recording again anyway as it's easy in that situation to not even know that you've missed something. Not that you'll understand everything from your notes, because notes are just that, if they had all the information I as a teacher would just tell you the notes (assuming you aren't using the word notes for an actual word for word transcription, which would be impossible). Then there's the repetition usage of a recording as well

    (Original post by Ishax)
    I did say I use my lecture slides and make my own notes in lectures. I do further reading outside lectures but most of its theory. I study Computing maybe it's different for course.

    When I'm in lecture I like to focus on the lecturer and absorb the information I'm being given. If I'm still stuck or confused, there's always tutorials to ask the question directly. You're not supposed to write down everything the lecturer says word to word. I only write donthe relevant information.

    One question, if you can't write stuff down as the lecturer is speaking how did you cope at school etc? For example, there you had to write everything down unless you did recordings there also and at sixth form/college then fair enough.

    I don't understand how the government came into this discussion but okay.
    All of it would be relevant, otherwise why would it be told
    When I was at school, our lessons were not lectures, and even then on the odd occasion where we were made to copy off the board, I used to try and avoid it as I knew that I was never going to read that again. Rather I used to take time to understand it at that point. If it was too rushed for me to understand then it would have been to rushed for me to copy which was a fault of the teacher for not using the time better, i.e. running through it with us and making the source of the material available to us so we could learn from it in our own time or spend more time on that in class.
    By the time we got to 6th form, we were allowed to take pictures of the board , although I wasn't one of those people because by that time I realised the school powerpoints were dire and the material found online or in the school textbook was far more useful.

    At my first uni, things were different. The material was a lot tougher to understand (impossible within the lecture) and find good educational sources online. I did really well in the modules with recorded online lectures and good online notes and not so good in the modules with the backward lecturers, still relying on students to take notes however they could within the lecture.
    At my second uni, lectures were ONLY online recordings and classroom based lessons only consisted of seminars. To be honest it doesn't take a genius to work out that this is the more efficient way. Going to a lecture is just pointless, but watching recordings you can pause it and at any point and do whatever you need to do to understand the material, whether rewind it a bit or quickly research that section of the material in between, or if need be, make quality notes at the same time as understanding it. Any questions you need to ask are for the seminar; it's not as if any questions get asked at usual lectures anyway. I wouldn't even call this extremely progressive really, there are just way too many universities stuck in the past.

    (Original post by jneill)
    Yes, a Dictaphone left at the lecturn is ideal. Anything else is sub-optimal.

    And the earlier poster who has software to transcrib to text is exactly right.

    BUT I do wonder if it's really going to be that useful in practice...

    Lecture notes etc should really have all that's needed.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    If you are handed good quality lecture notes then that's good. However if that is all that is required then there is no use of a lecture is there? Although obviously watching/listening to a lecture might suit visual/auditory type learners. Although sometimes the case, a lot of lecturers don't provide quality notes, in which case, a recording would of course help students to re-run either the things they didn't understand at the time or to add to the notes that were missed.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Great post. Loving the indignation.

    Its better to make good notes during the lecture imo, its what all the smart students did. People tend not to have time to go through it all again and recording cna make you lazy. You will soon know anyway based on your results.

    Btw its a public forum. You posted a thread and people can post their opinion, however much you want to protest they cant.
    "All smart students" - yh right, you probably didn't notice some others, I knew a fair few nerds, including myself, who understood how pointless it all was. You may have been lucky to not have to spend much time outside of lesson time to understand everything. Tbh, in lectures there were also too many distractions e.g. fresher's flu, people typing, flicking pages, mates showing you a game they were playing etc. So even if I had been to a lecture, I used to watch the online recording, if available, at least once, and twice occasionally. If I couldn't be make it/ be bothered for a lecture, then I just watched the online recording a couple of times and that was it. Where there was no online recording, it used to occasionally take me a heck of along time to understand what was going on when I was reading the notes, as I was hardly be able to understand anything from the live lectures. Hence, in my opinion, recordings can save time.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Doesnt tend to happen and whats wrong with just copying or checking with your friends on the bit that was missed?
    What is this 'friends' you speak of?
    But seriously, not every module has people you know on it. You can try to make friends, but it is not always best to rely on other people if OP has a way of solving problem his/herself. My best friends at uni were not on my course, and my classmate friends were either too snobbish to help you like a lot of successful people tend to be, or they were counting on me to fill in their gaps as they were in a worse position than me.

    (Original post by DrSocSciences)
    Recording lectures is a complete waste of time, in my view, unless there's dyslexia or dyspraxia involved. Listening back and transcribing takes 4-5 times as long as the "live" content, and audio transcription software still leaves a huge amount of material that needs editing.

    Just listen, watch the visual material (which isn't captured in any case by audio, obviously), and take notes.
    It would only take longer because you are doing it properly this time, imo. It used too take me around 2-3 times as long as the original recording if I didn't go to the original lecture. If you get value out of the original lecture then you can knock 1 off.
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    It all really hinges on how you learn best, which is a very personal thing. There is no "one size fits all" approach which will work for everyone, so you just need to try things until you find which one - or combination - work for you.

    Personally, I was a rabid note taker. I absorbed information more readily when I wrote it down. If I just saw it on a lecture slide or heard a lecturer say it, it simply wouldn't stick. No idea why - that's just the way it was and I found what worked for me. Some people learn best by being able to listen/relisten to a recording of a lecture. It's as good a technique to try as any other. One of my colleagues had an hour long commute and they used to replay lecture recordings on the journey there and back. Worked for them.

    There's no right or wrong technique. There's just the one(s) that work for you.
 
 
 
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