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Do a STEM degree if you want a job Watch

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    (Original post by akbar0123)
    Accounting will also be automated heavily in the future
    It's true. Accounting will easily be automated! That's what I'm afraid of
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    (Original post by navarre)
    I'd just like to point out that medicine and dentistry (and I'd imagine veterinary science) are *not* STEM degrees, and are not classified as such by most authorities.
    I think you'll find that our own government aswell as others considers all medical degrees as being STEM(M) even including nursing
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    Whatever.....

    This is 2016.......
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Whatever.....

    This is 2016.......
    I know, that's why I'm encouraging people to do stem degrees because the non-stem jobs are increasingly being automated and therefore STEM really is the career of the future.
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    Ultimately you should pursue what you're interested in, that way you are more likely to succeed in that field and also be happy during uni
    no. you really shouldnt.

    I am highly interested in football - but I am a bloody good educational consultant.

    Should I pursue football? Where I am not good enough to ever be a player, and other roles are very competative with limmited points of entrance?

    Or should I go into education, where there is good money to be made, a stable living, and I am very good at it (even if It does not get me as passionate as football?)

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    The life advice 'Do what you love'

    Is awful advice for most people, and its spouted far to much by parents these days.

    Just because you love something does make you more likely to succeed in that field then if you did not like it.. but it does not make you more likely to succeed in that field, then another one you may be more skilled at.

    And trust me, being happy at uni means nothing. Its 3 years of your life... its tiny compared to the next 30+ years of work.. if you cant stick out 3 years of tough work doing something you dont entirely like, then you are going to have a truelly awful time when you actually enter the real working world.

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    The real answer advice for young people is to truly explain and understand the risks involved with following your passions. and to properly explore the alternative routes that involve solid qualifications and work, whilst also working on your passions as a side interest. After all.. most writers did not study litterature, most musicians did not studdy music, most photographers did not study photography etc.

    For some, if enough talent is shown early enough, then 100% focus on their passion is a good move, but for most it is a hugely limmiting career decision that ends badly, and causes years of having to recover career prospects.
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    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    no. you really shouldnt.

    I am highly interested in football - but I am a bloody good educational consultant.

    Should I pursue football? Where I am not good enough to ever be a player, and other roles are very competative with limmited points of entrance?

    Or should I go into education, where there is good money to be made, a stable living, and I am very good at it (even if It does not get me as passionate as football?)

    ---

    The life advice 'Do what you love'

    Is awful advice for most people, and its spouted far to much by parents these days.

    Just because you love something does make you more likely to succeed in that field then if you did not like it.. but it does not make you more likely to succeed in that field, then another one you may be more skilled at.

    And trust me, being happy at uni means nothing. Its 3 years of your life... its tiny compared to the next 30+ years of work.. if you cant stick out 3 years of tough work doing something you dont entirely like, then you are going to have a truelly awful time when you actually enter the real working world.

    ---

    The real answer advice for young people is to truly explain and understand the risks involved with following your passions. and to properly explore the alternative routes that involve solid qualifications and work, whilst also working on your passions as a side interest. After all.. most writers did not study litterature, most musicians did not studdy music, most photographers did not study photography etc.

    For some, if enough talent is shown early enough, then 100% focus on their passion is a good move, but for most it is a hugely limmiting career decision that ends badly, and causes years of having to recover career prospects.
    Well ultimately its a judgement based on the individual - Do they want to be happy or do they want to be successful? Ultimately, they'll need a realistic approach to their life.
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    (Original post by akbar0123)
    In today's world, graduate jobs are highly competitive and there are loads and loads of people with generic degrees like history or politics. Meanwhile, the engineering tech sectors are hiring and are future proof careers as well.

    In the near future, more and more jobs will become automated. The ones that won't be are STEM jobs like engineering or tech or life sciences related stuff. So it is a very stupid idea to do a non-STEM degree now since you will be out of a job in the future and will also a truffle to even get a job in the first place, as shown by the large number of humanities students working in McDonald's.

    STEM degrees give you proper skills that will get you a good job, as long as you're not an idiot in social situations. And those careers are less likely to be automated, unlike finance, banking, business, retail which are already replacing humans with AI.

    So don't just do what you enjoy. Do something that will get you a job that's future proof.
    a stem degree won't give you **** if you're stupid and can't do ur job
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    (Original post by lostintrnslation)
    doing a degree in a modern foreign language gives you near-native or native levels of fluency. some students even study more than one language at university.
    That could be the case for some people but in general is not necessarily true at all. First, if your goal is to become a native speaker then I would say that you need to review your objectives because that is almost impossible. It's possible within three to four years to become 'moderately fluent' shall we say. But to expect to be at a native level is unrealistic in my view, especially as most of a language degree is not spent using the language 24/7 on a daily basis.

    Second, it may vary from language to language. From my personal experience, British students who enrol on a Chinese degree have no chance of being fluent by the end of it. In fact, most of them who I met in Beijing absolutely wasted their year abroad and I'm sure it happens to many others in different language programmes too (perhaps to an even greater extent too, seeing as not many in China speak English anyway).

    Nonetheless, I understand that I don't have personal experience of other languages so I cannot exactly tell you you're wrong. But I can at least make some conjecture about the idea of being a native speaker after a couple of years.
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    (Original post by akbar0123)
    I'm just making sure people know the reality before they make a decision. By all means do a non-STEm degree if you want but be prepared for losing your job to an algorithm. The future is in STEM careers.
    I don't think algorithms can write a novel. Or teach children. Or make art. Or became an actor on broadway. There's more to life.

    Sincerely,
    An engineering grad
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    Blame the coders
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    STEM master race.
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    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    That could be the case for some people but in general is not necessarily true at all. First, if your goal is to become a native speaker then I would say that you need to review your objectives because that is almost impossible. It's possible within three to four years to become 'moderately fluent' shall we say. But to expect to be at a native level is unrealistic in my view, especially as most of a language degree is not spent using the language 24/7 on a daily basis.

    Second, it may vary from language to language. From my personal experience, British students who enrol on a Chinese degree have no chance of being fluent by the end of it. In fact, most of them who I met in Beijing absolutely wasted their year abroad and I'm sure it happens to many others in different language programmes too (perhaps to an even greater extent too, seeing as not many in China speak English anyway).

    Nonetheless, I understand that I don't have personal experience of other languages so I cannot exactly tell you you're wrong. But I can at least make some conjecture about the idea of being a native speaker after a couple of years.
    people studying languages degrees will have a gcse and an a level in at least one of the languages they're studying. that's 7 years of studying (5 at high school and 2 at college) before they even start their degree.
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    (Original post by Oddwatermelon)
    . What people on this website can't seem to grasp is that a degree isn't everything, employers just don't care that much, they really don't. They want hard working, social individuals who can function within a team.
    It depends on the field. For instance, in my area of expertise, MPharm. (Masters of Pharmacy) requires a certified school of study over four years, and an additional year on-the-job training with a mentor, followed with the boards certified exam, before you can call yourself a pharmacist and practice.

    Many more professions are just as stringent and rigorous in there acceptance.
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    Just do whatever you want to do.

    Make sure you do placements though, this also applies to people doing STEM degrees (I'm doing a STEM degree).
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    Didn't even do a stem degree and agree with OP.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    I think you'll find that our own government aswell as others considers all medical degrees as being STEM(M) even including nursing
    Medicine is far too vocational to b e a STEM degree, and, whilst having a scientific basis, is more of an art than a science.
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    for modern languages wouldn't it be more cost effective to study the language on a course much less expensive then a degree then go to that country and work/live there so that eventually the language becomes second nature. seems cheaper then paying 9k a year. I mean I accept language can be a skill that pays quite a bit but I fail to see why you would need to spend so much money on getting those skills when that method would be much less efficient then just living in the country.
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    (Original post by navarre)
    Medicine is far too vocational to b e a STEM degree, and, whilst having a scientific basis, is more of an art than a science.
    Your opinion is interesting but irrelevant; our own government considers it as a STEM degree alongside architecture
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    for modern languages wouldn't it be more cost effective to study the language on a course much less expensive then a degree then go to that country and work/live there so that eventually the language becomes second nature. seems cheaper then paying 9k a year. I mean I accept language can be a skill that pays quite a bit but I fail to see why you would need to spend so much money on getting those skills when that method would be much less efficient then just living in the country.
    My thinking too. That's the point I was trying to make above.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    for modern languages wouldn't it be more cost effective to study the language on a course much less expensive then a degree then go to that country and work/live there so that eventually the language becomes second nature. seems cheaper then paying 9k a year. I mean I accept language can be a skill that pays quite a bit but I fail to see why you would need to spend so much money on getting those skills when that method would be much less efficient then just living in the country.
    you could say that about almost any subject... why study x at university when you could teach it yourself for free. having a degree in a modern foreign language is a way of proving that you can speak a foreign language and enables you to go on to do a masters in translating/interpreting or a pgce or whatever you want to do - which you will need a degree for!
    but hey, why not tell me - a languages student - how i should and shouldn't be studying
 
 
 
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