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Which is a better degree to have

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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    Oh really? So I could basically do a geology PS and still apply for natsci. Yes I expect Imperial accomodation to be horrendously expensive.
    Yep. If you're applying to mostly NatSci courses then it's definitely worth addressing why you're applying for NatSci but if Geology is your main interest then make that the subject.

    And yes - Imperial's Earth Sciences courses look absolutely amazing, the only thing that made me decide not to go there was because of the accommodation issue. It's not just the cost, it's also the fact that it's in London and in later years unless you're very wealthy, you're probably going to have to live further away and commute, which is not something I want to do. A lot of people think living in London is great but that's not what I wanted!
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    Thanks for the advice, maybe I'll talk to school about it. But honestly I don't think I'll ever be sure. I've seriously been through everything. I thought I was doing maths for ages, then chemistry, then engineering, then astrophysics, then philosophy, then earth sciences, it's been bloody ridiculous, I don't think time will help. So tbh I just want to get the fricken application in lol. Luckily natsci covers pretty much all those things so I can prolong deciding hahaha.


    I know (and remember) the feeling....I just ruled things out!

    I know two things that really helped me that might be worthwhile in helping you cement your thoughts.

    The first was having to do a short research project over the summer between Yr 12 and 13. It was for physics A level but our physics teacher was pretty happy for us to cover anything we fancied really. I picked the physics of clouds because it seemed like it might be interesting (plus I really love it when you can take a whole bunch of science theory and SEE how it applies in "the real world" ). It was a pretty shoddy project tbh (this was pre-internet so I was stuck with pretty entry level text books from my local reference library) but it did get me thinking beyond the subjects I'd studied at school. I looked into meteorology degrees, ruled them out because of where they were available at the time and broadened my thinking to environmental related degrees.

    Then I went on an engineering summer school (with this lot http://www.etrust.org.uk/headstart-inspire-ris ). It was brilliant - completely convinced me that engineering was NOT for me...but that university was and that I was right to look into environmental science/geoscience courses because those areas where by far the bits of the summer school that had me interested. I know you're not in the UK but do you have any opportunities in your country to visit your local universities? That might help you get more of a feel for what is available. Similarly taking a few MOOCs in various uni level science topics might help you figure out what gets you excited (https://www.edx.org/ has the broadest range of science modules https://www.futurelearn.com/courses has the most with a UK focus and http://www.open.edu/openlearn/scienc...nology/science are generally good too). If you aren't sure about geology then http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~imw/ is worth a look....it's a bit.....dated.....in terms of appearance but it is an amazing resource that gives a very good level of insight (in a way that is accessible without much or any geological training) into how field work can allow you to understand geological history (of course there's a lot more to geology than field work). Also I don't know if you can access this from outside the UK but http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b036...pisodes/player is worth a trawl through previous episodes - again they're very accessible for pre-university students but they give good information on scientific research and topics (although it's all a bit life science heavy IMO ).
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    They're both top quality courses with little to choose between them.

    Natural sciences is more flexible, so if you're not totally sure what you want to specialise in it gives you more leeway to find out.

    Personally I like Durham a lot more than London, but that's personal preference.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I think this is pretty misleading. Firstly, from what I remember when I was applying to Imperial, their cheapest accommodation was in the form of flats that are very far away from the university, did not have very much capacity at all and were mainly for people in their second year who for whatever reason didn't have any private accommodation. The rooms that most first years occupy were in the region of £180-200+/week, which must be considerably more than you'd pay in Durham. Also, in later years when you're no longer in halls, surely it's significantly cheaper to rent in Durham than anywhere near Imperial?



    Natural Sciences courses are expecting to get applications from applicants who have applied for single-honours courses at their other choices.
    True - the issue is more the expensive and compulsory nature of ALL of Durham's accommodation. Living in college is compulsory for almost all students and the price ranges from £6,800-£7,000 (albeit in most cases including catering) with only a £225 discount if you're in a shared room....so basically ALL Durham first years will need to find £7k for their accommodation costs whereas elsewhere there's usually some degree of flexibility if you're willing to compromise (and for UK students in London they'd be able to get additional loans).
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    (Original post by PQ)
    True - the issue is more the expensive and compulsory nature of ALL of Durham's accommodation. Living in college is compulsory for almost all students and the price ranges from £6,800-£7,000 (albeit in most cases including catering) with only a £225 discount if you're in a shared room....so basically ALL Durham first years will need to find £7k for their accommodation costs whereas elsewhere there's usually some degree of flexibility if you're willing to compromise (and for UK students in London they'd be able to get additional loans).
    Wow that's a lot... any idea why it's so much? That's literally double what I pay at Oxford and even including food it's still a good £2000+ more...
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Wow that's a lot... any idea why it's so much? That's literally double what I pay at Oxford and even including food it's still a good £2000+ more...
    No idea (but it is a lot - even if you consider that it includes meals) especially considering that that isn't en suite in many cases either (only ~£200 extra for en suite - so for that it works out quite cheap but IIRR they don't have many en suite rooms available for undergrads). https://www.dur.ac.uk/undergraduate/...olleges/costs/
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    (Original post by PQ)
    No idea (but it is a lot - even if you consider that it includes meals) especially considering that that isn't en suite in many cases either (only ~£200 extra for en suite - so for that it works out quite cheap but IIRR they don't have many en suite rooms available for undergrads). https://www.dur.ac.uk/undergraduate/...olleges/costs/
    Oh, it could be that they get to keep their rooms during the vacations. According to that website you have to specifically apply to get money back if you vacate your room during the holidays and even then it's not guaranteed, whereas at Oxford you don't really have a choice in the matter. That would make sense given that's probably an extra 12 weeks of rent or so.
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    Geology at Imperial or Natural Sciences at Durham?
    Geology at Imperial is the better option. Imperial's the best at Geology, and for good reason: they keep adding stuff to the degree to make sure they're ahead of the pack and getting the best education for their students. They've recently introduced python programming as part of their Geology BSc/MSci.

    Don't be worrying about the situation of oil.
    As well as bountiful oilfields in North America, Russia, Saudi Arabia and other producers in the Middle East, there are massive, barely tapped reserves in South America, Africa and the Arctic: not billions of barrels’ worth, but trillions. So the planet is not about to run out of oil. On the contrary, according to a Harvard University report published last year, we are heading for a glut.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/eart...ut-of-oil.html

    Also, petroleum geology is only one of many other disciplines you could go into: geochemistry; hydrogeology; sedimentology, renewables, environmental, engineering geology, hydrogeology, seismology, geophysics (although this is more the geophysics course).

    It might be too late but have you been to the open days? Imperial already had theirs, I think Durham may have had theirs already.

    I'm hoping to make Imperial for Geology this year as well, so good luck!
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    (Original post by DMcGovern)
    Don't be worrying about the situation of oil.
    As well as bountiful oilfields in North America, Russia, Saudi Arabia and other producers in the Middle East, there are massive, barely tapped reserves in South America, Africa and the Arctic: not billions of barrels’ worth, but trillions. So the planet is not about to run out of oil. On the contrary, according to a Harvard University report published last year, we are heading for a glut.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/eart...ut-of-oil.html
    Not to derail this thread but you're making the dangerous assumption here that all of this oil is going to be used. Indeed, Tony Hayward (the ex-CEO of BP) said at a lecture at my department recently that he thinks the demand for oil (for energy) will stop well before oil reserves are ever remotely depleted. I'm not suggesting that the industry is in imminent collapse but I do not think it's remotely as stable as oil reserves would indicate - there is never going a major revival of the oil industry.
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    ??? obviously. There can be two people going for a job, same class degree, same a levels, same charisma, same everything blah blah but one went to aberystwyth and the other went to cambridge. Which do you think will get the job?
    This is a false analogy i'm afraid. All people are different, will have different Charismas, life histories, learning outcomes, degrees and universities. Let me give you another example, would you rather go to a poor university, and come out with a good degree (2i up), or a good one, and most likely fail to get a good degree? And you also have to remember that degrees are nothing like 6th form, there is no hand holding for them, and that is why over 50% drop out. Good luck!

    PS you need a 2i to get on to most postgraduate programs, and it is hard to get it.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Not to derail this thread but you're making the dangerous assumption here that all of this oil is going to be used. Indeed, Tony Hayward (the ex-CEO of BP) said at a lecture at my department recently that he thinks the demand for oil (for energy) will stop well before oil reserves are ever remotely depleted. I'm not suggesting that the industry is in imminent collapse but I do not think it's remotely as stable as oil reserves would indicate - there is never going a major revival of the oil industry.
    Oh I'm not saying that absolutely all of it will be used but it's not in decline. According to the CEO of PetroCeltic there's going to be a big bump in about two years.

    More than $11 billion of transactions were announced globally in July as crude’s recovery fueled hopes of a steadier market. Activity picked up as confidence returned and companies started looking towards future growth instead of focusing entirely on survival.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...ival-to-growth
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    ??? obviously. There can be two people going for a job, same class degree, same a levels, same charisma, same everything blah blah but one went to aberystwyth and the other went to cambridge. Which do you think will get the job?
    Employers are employing people not universities. For most employers in most careers the "reputation" of a candidates university is not a factor. Rightly.

    For careers where it historically has been a factor some employers are starting to change their recruitment procedures so the university is actually hidden from the interviewers/selectors to prevent potential biases.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Employers are employing people not universities. For most employers in most careers the "reputation" of a candidates university is not a factor. Rightly.

    For careers where it historically has been a factor some employers are starting to change their recruitment procedures so the university is actually hidden from the interviewers/selectors to prevent potential biases.
    I just know that a ridiculous amount of people in both politics and the civil service went to oxbridge and that can't be a coincidence. Hopefully it'll change in the future.

    (Original post by DMcGovern)
    Geology at Imperial is the better option. Imperial's the best at Geology, and for good reason: they keep adding stuff to the degree to make sure they're ahead of the pack and getting the best education for their students. They've recently introduced python programming as part of their Geology BSc/MSci.

    Don't be worrying about the situation of oil.
    As well as bountiful oilfields in North America, Russia, Saudi Arabia and other producers in the Middle East, there are massive, barely tapped reserves in South America, Africa and the Arctic: not billions of barrels’ worth, but trillions. So the planet is not about to run out of oil. On the contrary, according to a Harvard University report published last year, we are heading for a glut.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/eart...ut-of-oil.html

    Also, petroleum geology is only one of many other disciplines you could go into: geochemistry; hydrogeology; sedimentology, renewables, environmental, engineering geology, hydrogeology, seismology, geophysics (although this is more the geophysics course).

    It might be too late but have you been to the open days? Imperial already had theirs, I think Durham may have had theirs already.

    I'm hoping to make Imperial for Geology this year as well, so good luck!
    That's good to know, will most likely not specialise into petroleum anyway it was just a worry I had haha. Maybe I'll see you there next year! Also are you not concerned about studying/living in London at all?

    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Not to derail this thread but you're making the dangerous assumption here that all of this oil is going to be used. Indeed, Tony Hayward (the ex-CEO of BP) said at a lecture at my department recently that he thinks the demand for oil (for energy) will stop well before oil reserves are ever remotely depleted. I'm not suggesting that the industry is in imminent collapse but I do not think it's remotely as stable as oil reserves would indicate - there is never going a major revival of the oil industry.
    Thanks for all you info plagio it's been really helpful
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    That's good to know, will most likely not specialise into petroleum anyway it was just a worry I had haha. Maybe I'll see you there next year! Also are you not concerned about studying/living in London at all?
    Well the accommodation costs aren't too bad, and they're right in the middle of London so close enough to the nightlife and things like the cinema, and literally a stone's throw from 3 big museums. Although I might live with family I have in London so
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    (Original post by DMcGovern)
    Well the accommodation costs aren't too bad, and they're right in the middle of London so close enough to the nightlife and things like the cinema, and literally a stone's throw from 3 big museums. Although I might live with family I have in London so
    Oh you live in London? I've only visited twice so you can imagine how scary it would be for me hahaha. There would be loads to do but probably less people to do it with right? Would be harder to make friends I think, especially in a city vibe.
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    Oh you live in London? I've only visited twice so you can imagine how scary it would be for me hahaha. There would be loads to do but probably less people to do it with right? Would be harder to make friends I think, especially in a city vibe.
    Ach no but I have family living there that have offered a spare room to me; whereabouts are you from? I can bet you're more used to the city than me! I wouldn't say that, when I went to their open day this month they were all really friendly and said there are enough people there that everyone finds friends that personalities match
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    (Original post by DMcGovern)
    Ach no but I have family living there that have offered a spare room to me; whereabouts are you from? I can bet you're more used to the city than me! I wouldn't say that, when I went to their open day this month they were all really friendly and said there are enough people there that everyone finds friends that personalities match
    North yorkshire lol in the middle of this tiny little village in the middle of no where (can u call 5 houses a village idk). That's reassuring, hopefully they'll be at least someone. But I've heard that because it's so competitive and everyones hardworking, the partying side of it is pretty dire. Apparently instead of having a freshers week they have two days of induction
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    North yorkshire lol in the middle of this tiny little village in the middle of no where (can u call 5 houses a village idk). That's reassuring, hopefully they'll be at least someone. But I've heard that because it's so competitive and everyones hardworking, the partying side of it is pretty dire. Apparently instead of having a freshers week they have two days of induction
    Same I live in a townland which is a tiny rural district that doesn't even contain a village you'd have to drive a few miles to find a town Really? I know it's hard but there must be some free time, especially for sports clubs. Seriously are you sure?
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    (Original post by DMcGovern)
    Same I live in a townland which is a tiny rural district that doesn't even contain a village you'd have to drive a few miles to find a town Really? I know it's hard but there must be some free time, especially for sports clubs. Seriously are you sure?
    Yep, my friend goes there, she started last year and I've been talking to her a lot about it. She thinks the uni expereince is definitely better else where which is what im concerned about. But then again, you do get a degree from imperial at the end of it lol
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    Yep, my friend goes there, she started last year and I've been talking to her a lot about it. She thinks the uni expereince is definitely better else where which is what im concerned about. But then again, you do get a degree from imperial at the end of it lol
    True aye It might depend on the course though, although I know the Geology course has a high number of lecture hours compared to the average. At least it's free-er than a school though
 
 
 
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