In your opinion, how do you define someone who is or isn’t British??

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  • View Poll Results: How would you, in your opinion, define somebody who is or isn’t British?
    Anyone and everyone who holds British Citizenship (including people who moved here as adults and naturalised)
    53
    41.73%
    A person born and bred in the UK - ancestry is irrelevant
    38
    29.92%
    A person born and bred in the UK – and primarily has British heritage/primarily of British origin
    27
    21.26%
    Anyone in the world who is primarily of British origin, e.g. the British diaspora (the UK, Anglo Americans, Anglo Austrialians, Anglo Canadians etc)
    9
    7.09%

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    Citizenship and blending in with British people and respecting British values not trying to spread their culture views into ours.
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    1
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    People with English/Scottish/Welsh ancestry
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    (Original post by the bear)
    anyone prepared to die for our country.
    i wouldn’t be prepared to die for an oppressive and inherently imperialist regime.

    i would be, however, prepared to die for the good of, and advancement of, humanity.
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    (Original post by rustyldner)
    Britain is essentially a nation of migrants
    Celts, Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans and Vikings, Huguenots, Indians, Russian Jews, Germans and Caribbeans/Indians after the fall of the British Empire.
    Thus to deny someone the right to be 'British' due to their ethnicity does not make sense.
    This is rubbish. All ethnicities are a mix if you go back far enough, and all ethnicities have a small amount of admixture from others. It's not significant. The fact is that before very recently Britain was a homogeneous nation with a shared identity, heritage and culture. Pithy truisms like yours became popular as a way to justify mass immigration and forced social engineering.
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    your father has to be at least 3 quarters British.
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    I have an Asian heritage, whilst i was born and bred in the UK, I don't consider myself to be British.


    Anyone who sees me (white british), instantly their first impression is 1. He's Asian 2. English most likely isn't his first language 3. He certainly is not British.

    So, why should I class myself as British when i'm clearly not perceived as one. Irrelevant of where I was born and the fact that English is the language I use 90% of the time.
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    (Original post by xylas)
    British ancestry is irrelevant to being British. How come you say you have no 'proper nationality'? If you can't think of a nationality you identify with more than British, then surely you are British. Also there's no such thing as a 'true Brit' maybe that's where your confusion lies.
    If British ancestry is irrelevant to being British then being British means nothing. If anyone can be British, then no one is British. You are undermining people's identity in order to facilitate their replacement. It's a genocidal worldview.

    If I moved to China and had kids with a British woman, those kids would not be considered Chinese because they don't have Chinese heritage. Your belonging to one group or another is not about the dirt you are born on (except in the case of New World countries) but about ancestry and heritage.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    But let me tell you this, if you are born British and you Voted Remain and did not defend this country's sovereignty from foreign corrupt bureacrats, you lose 45% of your Britishness.

    Do I? Who says? Why? If by "this country's sovereignty" you mean The Queen, then you should know that she doesn't have any rule over the nation, and she makes sure she stays out of politics. Also, she's subtly expressed her preference that Great Britain and Northern Ireland stay in the EU.
    I've just always thought of myself as English really, rather than British. The Irish, Scots and Welsh have separate identities and cultural references to the English, but we're all British in the same way that we're all European (or were). It's just a geographical thing. You're British if you live here.

    (Original post by 0to100)
    I wouldn't automatically consider someone English even if they're born here but if they are not to ethnically English parents. Because that's now about culture and stuff and lets be honest 90% of immigrants here no matter the number of generations do not assimilate.
    Wow, have you never been to Spain, or Cyprus, or Greece, or any of those nice hot countries full of English "expats" (they're not called immigrants) who just eat English food and only ever speak English to other English people? I met an English guy in Cyprus earlier this year who'd lived there nine years and not learned a word of Greek. He also voted for Brexit.
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    (Original post by Crassy)
    People with English/Scottish/Welsh ancestry
    What about Northern Ireland?
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    Why do only European countries have to define their identity ?

    These rules don't apply to Japan, African countries, Middle Eastern countries or anywhere else.
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    (Original post by Crassy)
    This is rubbish. All ethnicities are a mix if you go back far enough, and all ethnicities have a small amount of admixture from others. It's not significant. The fact is that before very recently Britain was a homogeneous nation with a shared identity, heritage and culture. Pithy truisms like yours became popular as a way to justify mass immigration and forced social engineering.
    Mass immigration? Humans have always been moving and it is the UK that voted to join the EU in 1975 and sets the current points system immigration policy for Non-EU migrants. And how exactly is it forced social engineering. British citizens vote for their government, it's a democracy just because the majority of UK citizens do not believe in the same things as you do does not make it forced.
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    (Original post by TheBBQ)
    If that isn't a bull**** figure then I don't know what is. You're telling me that hundreds of thousands of black people
    1st of all...you need to calm yourself down :lolwut:

    2nd of all...I never even specified which people I was talking about but when it comes to "assimilation" one is normally referring to culture/religion. Not race...

    Lastly...I'm right
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    (Original post by Crassy)
    The fact is that before very recently Britain was a homogeneous nation with a shared identity, heritage and culture.
    Not really. British identity is ultimately, not particularly popular. People prefer their constituent country identities. Most people in England, Scotland and Wales say they are English, Scottish and Welsh respectively. Northern Irish Catholics mostly say they Irish, and those who don't generally say they are Northern Irish. The only part of Britain where most people regard themselves as British is the Northern Irish Protestant community.

    Britain is, essentially, a multinational state, with distinct cultural minorities. For example, the Scots and Welsh languages both have more speakers than any immigrant language.
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    Nationality isn't a big deal. UK or other countries do need decent people. Do you like murderers? Do you like swindlers? What would happen if everyone were adulterers?

    Would you be happy if your love ones were thieves? Or what if most people became junkies or boozers? Those kinds of people can make UK or US a great country?

    Do you really think degrees or wealth can bring true happiness to families?
    I don't really.

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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)
    What about Northern Ireland?
    A lot of Norn Irons have English & Scottish ancestry.
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    1st of all...you need to calm yourself down :lolwut:

    2nd of all...I never even specified which people I was talking about but when it comes to "assimilation" one is normally referring to culture/religion. Not race...

    Lastly...I'm right
    And different races have different cultures..

    Also most religions are compatible with the culture here. You don't have to be of a certain religion to be assimilated.

    Unless you provide some real evidence or stats I have no reason to believe your made up figure.
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    (Original post by Crassy)
    If British ancestry is irrelevant to being British then being British means nothing. If anyone can be British, then no one is British. You are undermining people's identity in order to facilitate their replacement. It's a genocidal worldview.

    If I moved to China and had kids with a British woman, those kids would not be considered Chinese because they don't have Chinese heritage. Your belonging to one group or another is not about the dirt you are born on (except in the case of New World countries) but about ancestry and heritage.
    No not anyone can be British. You would have to 1) not identify as another nationality 2) have British citizenship 3) be part of the British community/share British values.

    Ancestry does not come into this whatsoever. Those children would be considered Chinese since they would have a Chinese birth certificate and be raised in the Chinese culture hence adhering to the Chinese community and values.

    (Original post by Desi_Scotsman)
    I have an Asian heritage, whilst i was born and bred in the UK, I don't consider myself to be British.


    Anyone who sees me (white british), instantly their first impression is 1. He's Asian 2. English most likely isn't his first language 3. He certainly is not British.

    So, why should I class myself as British when i'm clearly not perceived as one. Irrelevant of where I was born and the fact that English is the language I use 90% of the time.
    If you dont consider yourself British then why would you expect anyone else to? Just because you mostly speak English obviously by itself does not make you British. If you consider your identity to be Asian then whadyou know you will be perceived as Asian.
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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)
    Hi all, I’m just curious about how you, in your opinion, would consider somebody who is or isn’t British?

    As we all know, we are living in a more and more globalised world, with increasing mobility and transport meaning more movement between people, more immigration within the world meaning what defines a person’s nationality is becoming more complex now. A lot of people however are opposed to this globalisation, fearing loss of British cultural identity and would take the more traditional view that in order to be British is not only to born and bred in the UK, but to be primarily of British origin/have British ancestry as well. Whether we like it or not history and heritage are an important part of a persons identity.

    For example take me I’m born and raised in England to Irish parents and I personally would find it quite difficult to call myself British/english given I have no British ancestry (mum is from NI however). However FWIW I actually moved to NI at 14, moving during school, still have an English accent today, and known to everyone as the “English guy” so by that token, given I don’t have an Irish accent, never played Gaelic games (Irelands no.1 sport), never learned Irish, never went to catholic schools, I don’t feel Irish and I wouldn't be accepted as properly Irish by the locals either. So I’ve come to conclusion I don’t have a proper nationality in actual fact, but not having British heritage I feel prohibits me from calling myself a true Brit.

    However, I do want to make it clear that if a Black or an Asian person considers themselves British/English, I will too, I’ll consider people what they consider themselves to be, I just personally wouldn't feel comfortable being in that situation calling myself British (hence why I don't).

    So who in your opinion, do consider a British person to be? (I've decided to poll this )
    Whereabouts in the North are you? If you point out to people you're Irish (from having Irish parents, which counts more than being born somewhere or your accent) generally they'll accept you as Irish, unless they take the craic too far which is what my cousins in across the border do calling me Brit, (Black and) Tan etc. when they really know you are but just want to annoy you.

    Honestly if both your parents are Irish you're Irish. If you're born somewhere else that just makes you second generation, not half. That's your genetic identity.

    Do try GAA though it's great craic - hurling can't be bate with a shtick (except it can :p:D)
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    (Original post by xylas)
    No not anyone can be British. You would have to 1) not identify as another nationality 2) have British citizenship 3) be part of the British community/share British values.

    Ancestry does not come into this whatsoever. Those children would be considered Chinese since they would have a Chinese birth certificate and be raised in the Chinese culture hence adhering to the Chinese community and values.
    Yes it does. Being born in a different country but retaining the same genetics of your parents' ethnic group does not change your ethnicity. Also considering the growth of ethnic enclaves such as Irish, Polish, Indian areas of London mean these children would be brought up in their parents' culture, and even if they weren't in these areas their parents would bring them up with their own sense of community and common values.

    Birth certificates do not come into it - passport ownership might; for example those not of a Saudi ethnic background born in Saudi Arabia are not entitled to Saudi passports or citizenship.

    For example, say the son of a white Frenchman and woman, the father being in the air force, is born in Uganda and they live there,could be before or after the child reaches adulthood, and go back to France. Would the child or his parents call him/her with any sincerity Ugandan? Definitely no. Would the authorities? Possibly in terms of citizenship but not ethnicity and probably not nationality unless he/she accepted a Ugandan passport.
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    People born and bred in the uk that are primarily of british origin.
 
 
 
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