Missed Oxbridge deadline by 1 minute

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    (Original post by Overses)
    I don't think universities see submission time. Usually only the date but rarely the exact time. I have never ever seen in an application for anything that has a time stamp as opposed to a date stamp or no stamps at all. Because if you have time you would also have date and that is just a huge clutter on the page .
    It's an electronic timestamp attached to the file. Not some huge physical red ink stamp splodged onto a sheet of paper.

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    (Original post by Blueberry.89)
    Thats the biggest BS in the history of this forum.

    Oxbridge dont even look at applications before admissions test results are in.The latter determines whether you get an interview or not (top 25% for my course)
    This isn't really the case. Cambridge certainly use test results as one of a number of factors in deciding to whom places will be offered.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's an electronic timestamp attached to the file. Not some huge physical red ink stamp splodged onto a sheet of paper.

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    (Original post by jneill)
    That may be the case for some courses at Oxford, but it isn't for Cambridge. There's no mechanistic deselection due to pre-interview admissions assessment results.

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    For Oxford BA in Economics and Management under FAQs:

    The Thinking Skills Assessment (TSA) is very important, and is used as a first filter for applicants. A few candidates who do not perform well on the TSA may be invited for interview, but this is quite rare.

    We do not set a percentage required on the TSA. We aim to interview three candidates for every place, so we use the TSA to help identify the top 300 or so candidates.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    This isn't really the case. Cambridge certainly use test results as one of a number of factors in deciding to whom places will be offered.
    Its true that actual/predicted grades, contextual data, PS, reference, admissions test score and interview performance are all considered when handing out offers.

    But to get an offer you need to get an interview.

    For Oxford BA in Economics and Management under FAQs:The Thinking Skills Assessment (TSA) is very important, and is used as a first filter for applicants. A few candidates who do not perform well on the TSA may be invited for interview, but this is quite rare. We do not set a percentage required on the TSA. We aim to interview three candidates for every place, so we use the TSA to help identify the top 300 or so candidates.
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    (Original post by Blueberry.89)
    Its true that actual/predicted grades, contextual data, PS, reference, admissions test score and interview performance are all considered when handing out offers.

    But to get an offer you need to get an interview.

    For Oxford BA in Economics and Management under FAQs:The Thinking Skills Assessment (TSA) is very important, and is used as a first filter for applicants. A few candidates who do not perform well on the TSA may be invited for interview, but this is quite rare. We do not set a percentage required on the TSA. We aim to interview three candidates for every place, so we use the TSA to help identify the top 300 or so candidates.
    One course at one university does not equate to "Oxbridge ".
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    As jneill has said, yes: a few courses might use tests like this, but the majority don't.
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    (Original post by Blueberry.89)
    For Oxford BA in Economics and Management under FAQs:

    The Thinking Skills Assessment (TSA) is very important, and is used as a first filter for applicants. A few candidates who do not perform well on the TSA may be invited for interview, but this is quite rare.

    We do not set a percentage required on the TSA. We aim to interview three candidates for every place, so we use the TSA to help identify the top 300 or so candidates.
    That's why I said "for some courses at Oxford, but it isn't for Cambridge."

    It seems that your reading accuracy matches your time management...

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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    That's a lovely objet - is it yours? I'm coveting it.
    It's Google image's but yes would be a nice find.
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    With all due respect to you both, re-read the OP: "What happens to me?"

    This is a thread for my specific case as I don't see anyone else who is in my position here. Hence, the additional information for my specific application.

    Anyways, I will get to know for certain within 24 hours from UCAS.

    PQ: Am i right in deducing the following?

    I think UCAS will mark my application as valid/on-time for Oxford, however the university will see the time I submitted to UCAS. This means they will probably still consider me but it will be up to me to perform well on the admissions test to mitigate any doubts they have from seeing the late submission time.
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    (Original post by Blueberry.89)
    With all due respect to you both, re-read the OP: "What happens to me?"

    This is a thread for my specific case as I don't see anyone else who is in my position here. Hence, the additional information for my specific application.
    In your comment you generalised by saying "Oxbridge dont even look at applications before admissions test results are in.The latter determines whether you get an interview or not (top 25% for my course)". You final comment about "for my course" may be true, but generalising the statement for all of "Oxbridge" required my and other posters to point out the error. Otherwise anyone reading your post will have incorrect information. It's a public thread in a public forum, not just a personal thread for you.

    Also Overses was, afaik, also late.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Unless UCAS confirm on Monday that the application has been flagged as late then the OP shouldn't worry.

    UCAS tend to show *some* leniency because they know that some applications are delayed by their software and they're not up for a lawsuit.
    I asked a tutor again about this and he said UCAS marks nothing . UCAS just give it a time stamp and forwards all applications . So if you want to apply now you could. But it is the colleges who looks at the time stamp and has the final say. So it might be wise to contact the college instead.
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    (Original post by Overses)
    I asked a tutor again about this and he said UCAS marks nothing . UCAS just give it a time stamp and forwards all applications . So if you want to apply now you could. But it is the colleges who looks at the time stamp and has the final say. So it might be wise to contact the college instead.
    The Cambridge admissions tutor also said to you that late applications (i.e. timestamped after 18:00) will be rejected.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    I always enjoy a PS that boasts about good time management/self starter that was submitted 5 minutes before the deadline.
    Wait, people actually read Personal Statements at universities which don't interview?
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    (Original post by Overses)
    I asked a tutor again about this and he said UCAS marks nothing . UCAS just give it a time stamp and forwards all applications . So if you want to apply now you could. But it is the colleges who looks at the time stamp and has the final say. So it might be wise to contact the college instead.
    From last years news updates from UCAS to universities:

    "Identifying applicants who have met the deadline
    " Any applications with an 'application processed' date of 16 October or earlier should be deemed to have been received by the 15 October deadline."

    UCAS notify universities which applications were submitted by the deadline. Applications submitted after the deadline have processed dates a few days later (in 2015 it was 20 October).

    I don't know who you asked or their position in the admissions process. UCAS do add a date and time - but individuals in universities don't use that to determine who met the deadline. UCAS run their software and know which applications came through on time (or so close to the deadline that their software could caused enough delay to make the application slightly late).
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    (Original post by Overses)
    You are an admissions tutor ?
    No

    Not everyone who works in a university with involvement in admissions is an admissions tutor.
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    (Original post by Forecast)
    Wait, people actually read Personal Statements at universities which don't interview?
    Even at the least selective university it's likely that someone will read a PS to check that the applicant isn't mistakenly applying for the wrong course (and if you think that's unlikely my team deal with 5-10 calls every year from applicants who applied for the wrong university ).
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    (Original post by PQ)
    From last years news updates from UCAS to universities:

    "Identifying applicants who have met the deadline
    " Any applications with an 'application processed' date of 16 October or earlier should be deemed to have been received by the 15 October deadline."

    UCAS notify universities which applications were submitted by the deadline. Applications submitted after the deadline have processed dates a few days later (in 2015 it was 20 October).

    I don't know who you asked or their position in the admissions process. UCAS do add a date and time - but individuals in universities don't use that to determine who met the deadline. UCAS run their software and know which applications came through on time (or so close to the deadline that their software could caused enough delay to make the application slightly late).
    So according to UCAS , before oct 16 is on time?
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    (Original post by Overses)
    So according to UCAS , before oct 16 is on time?
    No

    LAST year applications with a processed date (processed date is NOT submitted date) of 16 were on time.

    This year they will notify universities of the date.

    Ring UCAS on Monday and ask if your application was classed as on time.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    No

    LAST year applications with a processed date (processed date is NOT submitted date) of 16 were on time.

    This year they will notify universities of the date.

    Ring UCAS on Monday and ask if your application was classed as on time.
    Great news....UCAS have confirmed my application is on-time.

    I was on the Pay/Send page before the 18:00 deadline and my app was received by UCAS at 18:01 who processed it at 18:03.

    They said that Oxford (tutors) will see the processed time but will go on what we (UCAS) tell them is on-time or late.

    They did not confirm the information you provided about last year.

    From what Oxbridge tutors have said:

    1. Colleges receive applications in batches each day from the central team who received all those applications the previous day. Colleges are informed when the last batch of on-time applications has been delivered (this would seem in-line with what you said happened last year). Further batches received after this are rejected as invalid by the college.

    2. Tutors do not see submission time (again agrees with what you say about processed time)
 
 
 
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