Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    And we're not allowed to wear anything underneath
    And now I understand why scrub tops have such large v-necks.

    (I just try to grab a gown when it gets a bit chilly)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Muse)
    How pretentious! Doesn't anyone ever think about the patients???
    #ashamed#
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Renal)
    And now I understand why scrub tops have such large v-necks.

    (I just try to grab a gown when it gets a bit chilly)
    I learnt that vest tops are a girls best friend!
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jamie)
    Theres a movement going on to shed the ties too. Though i think i'm the only junior where i am brazen enough to do it.
    Yeah when I was in micro and infection control there was a no tie/short-sleeved shirt policy. Though since microbiologists rarely venture out of the PHL shorts and t-shirt were the order of the day for me most days :cool:

    As for A/E being useless, (though i guess you were being facetious) I think it's very variable - though there was a guy who came in today who was assaulted a week ago, and had been twice to [neighbouring trust's DGH]'s A/E, only to be sent home.

    This guy was basically a walking textbook case of signs/symptoms for incr ICP/subdural/BOS # (the only time I have seen battle's sign, raccoon eyes, haemotympani, papilloedema, photophobia and profuse positional vomiting all at once). Dunno who they employ in said hospital's A/E, but I doubt they have medical training
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Are raccoon eyes the same as Panda Eyes? I got very excited when I saw them on my last firm!

    Battle's - is that the bruising behind the ear thang?

    I've got A&E at The London this year, and if it's not as rock and roll as "Trauma" I will be sad! That said - I'd like people who get better and no saddeness ever! Hmmm... Heading for a fall?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    yes and yes

    For the most part A/E is more like the mundane parts of trauma/medical dramas, with hypochondiacs presenting with stuff I wouldn't even go see a GP about :rolleyes:

    Though the inevitable major trauma makes it worthwhile. Oh and the friday night regulars
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Kewl! I did a fair bit of A&E/AAU stalking on my 3rd year firms... Am looking forward to doing it properly!
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Nice one, A/E and AAU/MAU are the perfect places for keen bean med students, at least up here, because outside weekday 9-5 it is rare to have to compete with other students and there tend to be more interesting cases ime
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Indeedy!

    I think my fave 'lets shove people in a holding bay and make it sound like an exciting ward' acronym so far has to be EMU! There's somebody at the door, aha! There's somebody at the door!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fluffy)
    I've got A&E at The London this year, and if it's not as rock and roll as "Trauma" I will be sad!


    Hmmm.
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by j00ni)
    Nice one, A/E and AAU/MAU are the perfect places for keen bean med students, at least up here, because outside weekday 9-5 it is rare to have to compete with other students and there tend to be more interesting cases ime
    Wish i had keeno underlings doing my bidding in MAU. That said some brighton peeps just started, but they sound like they've done **** all medicine in their 4th year.
    I frankly wouldn't trust a BSMS doctor to wipe my arse given they only really have 2 proper clinical years.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    lol, I'm surprised there aren't any tbh - MAU is one of the few places where as a student you can actually feel quite useful doing the bidding of the F1s
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by j00ni)
    lol, I'm surprised there aren't any tbh - MAU is one of the few places where as a student you can actually feel quite useful doing the bidding of the F1s
    Well they can clerk someone in (ish - taking 2 hours to do so) but the MAU nurses do most practical stuff like venflons, bloods, NGs (rare), catheters...

    Am trying to think back to what i was like in my 5th year doing MAU. Feels sooooo long ago. Infact everytime i think of 5th year i think of surgery (and doing endless flons and bloods) and GP. medicine is a long forgotten memory...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    End for traditional doctor's coat
    Doctors in white coats
    The doctors' new style coats would feature short sleeves
    The traditional doctor's white coat is to be changed as part of government plans to tackle hospital infections.

    The new style clothing will have short sleeves under guidance to come into effect at the start of next year.

    Doctors would also not be allowed to wear long-sleeve shirts, jewellery, or watches as part of the measures.

    The Department of Health says cuffs are likely to be "very contaminated", and that other forms of protection such as plastic aprons would be introduced.


    I'm determined that patient safety, including cleanliness, should be the first priority of every NHS organisation
    Alan Johnson
    Health Secretary

    It also advises healthcare staff in England against wearing a tie during clinical work.

    The new dress code is part of a raft of measures unveiled by Health Secretary Alan Johnson to tackle the spread of hospital-acquired infections such as MRSA and Clostridium difficile.

    Bigger role for nurses

    Matrons will now directly report their concerns about cleanliness and hygiene to hospital boards four times a year. There had been concern that the views of frontline staff were not reaching higher management.

    Hospital managers will also have a legal duty to notify cases of infection to the Health Protection Agency (HPA).

    Mr Johnson said: "I'm determined that patient safety, including cleanliness, should be the first priority of every NHS organisation.

    "Today's package of measures will give more responsibility to matrons and set guidelines on clothing that will help ensure thorough hand washing and prevent the spread of infections.

    "This is a clear signal to patients that doctors, nurses and other clinical staff are taking their safety seriously."

    The strategy follows a review of the NHS instigated by the Prime Minister shortly after he took over from Tony Blair in June.

    Hospitals are also to receive new clinical guidance about isolating patients who do become infected with C.difficile or MRSA.

    More single rooms will be used, and patients with the same infection will more often be nursed together.

    Integrated approach

    Dr Vivienne Nathanson, head science and ethics at the British Medical Asssociation, said a stricter dress code was only one aspect of preventing and controlling infection.

    "A co-ordinated approach addressing all the relevant factors, for example dress code, bed occupancy, hygiene in hospital and isolation policies, is most likely to be successful.

    "In addition, any new guidelines on dress code must be practical, realistic, and sensitive to different religious groups."

    Dr Peter Carter, general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, said: "This guidance offers a positive step forward in introducing dress code standards across all health professions to help reduce healthcare-associated infections."

    Mike Penning, the Shadow Health Minister, said: "The government has failed miserably to rid our hospitals of superbugs."

    He said nurses were fed up with spending time on administrative activities rather than on treating patients and ensuring hospitals were clean.

    A HPA review published in July showed hospital MRSA cases had fallen by 10% in the first three months of 2007 compared with a year ago.

    But rates for C. difficile, which mainly strikes the elderly, rose by 2%.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Day 1 - on call tonight :|
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    death of the white coat...
    :rolleyes:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/6998877.stm
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    whoever was saying about wearing scrubs, policy must vary greatly because in my hospital they're banned outside theatre.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    hmmm ... the BBC article seems to imply that it's the governments infection control plans that are gonna end the white coat era, when the phasing out had already started ages ago.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Labour spin... Making a story outta something that doesn't exist, to try to look proactive and electable...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    In other news: Labour pledge to end the problem of alligators in schools. Gordon Brown said today our children should never be bothered during the working day by any variety of aquatic reptilian.

    Or in a less sarcastic way, the easiest way to tell if a political story is nonsense is if the opposite is ridiculous. I mean, you're hardly going to get a story about promoting hospital acquired infections are you?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: October 4, 2007

University open days

  • University of Roehampton
    All departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
  • Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
  • Bournemouth University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.