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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    What world do you live in? Should every person in danger be given around-the-clock police protection?
    They are.


    How about we offer protection to all murderers?
    We do.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    They are.
    Tell that to the countless victims of domestic violence.

    We do.
    You don't.
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    (Original post by Shaun39)
    He was a boy - 15 years old - when he committed his one and only serious crime. Described by the judge as immature and full of bravado, he stabbed the head teacher whilst full of adrenaline and under the pressure of other gang members after having been running after another school pupil.

    Whilst in prison, he has taken his GCSEs and an NVQ in health and social care (despite having been previously illiterate). He has been well behaved throughout his sentence, and has been active in encouraging younger inmates to turn away from crime.

    Source

    Given the above, it seems the parole board is going to release him once his minimum tariff of 12 years has been fulfilled. That is most probably the correct decision; they release far more serious criminals who are far more likely to re-offend than Chindamo.

    Once released, he should of course be accorded full human rights. Those rights include the right not to be pursued, have your property wrecked, and your bodily integrity threatened, by lynch mob.

    Given the media fuss over Chindamo, it is only proper that he be given state protection upon release. One would envisage that this would relax after a couple of years of his being out of the limelight.

    The cost of providing basic human rights to all people who reside within our borders, is quite irrelevant, given the nation's prosperity.
    :dito:
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Tell that to the countless victims of domestic violence.
    What does domestic violence have to do with prisoner release programmes? All 'at risk' prisoners are offered new identities.

    You don't.
    If they are at risk of reprisal attacks, yes they are given protection.
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    All this would not be an issue had they just strung the ******* up.
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    (Original post by Zebedee)
    All this would not be an issue had they just strung the ******* up.
    ^o) What a delightfully progressive attitude.
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    (Original post by kidintheriot)
    ^o) What a delightfully progressive attitude.
    Quite visionary, in fact. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by kidintheriot)
    ^o) What a delightfully progressive attitude.
    i don't see why you lot are so caring for him. He killed a headteacher, a man trying to educate him and many others. He may be out in 12 years, Philip Lawrence is still dead, the education he could have delivered has been wasted. its an awfull thing to do.

    People in the middle ages may have been crude but there is merit in simple justice. It stops these ridiculous situations where the killer gets supported by the state for the rest of their life whilst the family of the victim get nothing.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    What does domestic violence have to do with prisoner release programmes? All 'at risk' prisoners are offered new identities.
    Because battered women don't get a permanent police escort, but this guy does. I think the former is in more need of protection than the latter. The stats speak for themselves.

    If they are at risk of reprisal attacks, yes they are given protection.
    You said all murderers are given protection. This is patently untrue. Is there any reason to think this guy deserves it more than others? Have you even known what he looks like until this crap made the papers?
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    (Original post by Zebedee)
    i don't see why you lot are so caring for him. He killed a headteacher, a man trying to educate him and many others. He may be out in 12 years, Philip Lawrence is still dead, the education he could have delivered has been wasted. its an awfull thing to do.

    People in the middle ages may have been crude but there is merit in simple justice. It stops these ridiculous situations where the killer gets supported by the state for the rest of their life whilst the family of the victim get nothing.
    And stringing up the murderer will still not bring the victim back to life. All it will achieve is remove yet another life and with it anything he may have brought to the benefit of the country and society.
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Because battered women don't get a permanent police escort, but this guy does. I think the former is in more need of protection than the latter. The stats speak for themselves.
    I'm not disputing that, but it's still irrelevant to whether HE should get one.

    Is there any reason to think this guy deserves it more than others? Have you even known what he looks like until this crap made the papers?
    Any person released from jail can get a new identity if it becomes apparant they are at risk of attack. He is more at risk since the man he murdered was an important community leader and it angered a lot of people. Following the media speculation surrounding his release, it is even more likely that somebody will attack him.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    I'm not disputing that, but it's still irrelevant to whether HE should get one.
    But you said the police give protection to anyone who needs it. Are you going to try to be consistent?

    Any person released from jail can get a new identity if it becomes apparant they are at risk of attack. He is more at risk since the man he murdered was an important community leader and it angered a lot of people. Following the media speculation surrounding his release, it is even more likely that somebody will attack him.
    Please tell me the amount of murderers who were murdered outside of prison in the last decade.
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    [quote=Bismarck]But you said the police give protection to anyone who needs it. Are you going to try to be consistent?[quote]

    By 'anyone who needs it', I quite obviously meant released prisoners, since that is the context of the whole thread.

    Please tell me the amount of murderers who were murdered outside of prison in the last decade.
    I don't know, I doubt anybody knows precisely. The number, I would imagine, is greatly reduced because most of them are in protection schemes.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    By 'anyone who needs it', I quite obviously meant released prisoners, since that is the context of the whole thread.
    And why exactly should murderers get priority over victims of domestic violence?

    I don't know, I doubt anybody knows precisely. The number, I would imagine, is greatly reduced because most of them are in protection schemes.
    Nice circular logic there. How about we provide some actual stats:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/2598243.stm

    90,000 reports of domestic violence per year in London alone. So who needs protection more?
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Because battered women don't get a permanent police escort, but this guy does. I think the former is in more need of protection than the latter. The stats speak for themselves.
    There are plenty of facilities and services available to help battered women; most of the time, however, they don't want them.
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    What's more is that women who are going to become victims of abuse are not known in advance whereas it is known in advance that this man needs protection.
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    Surely one could say that being hated by your commnity is all part of being a convicted murderer, seems fair enough to me. If they get specific threats, fair enough, specific action should be taken but i don't see why they should have highly expensive protection just to make them feel cosier in their beds.
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    (Original post by Zebedee)
    Surely one could say that being hated by your commnity is all part of being a convicted murderer, seems fair enough to me. If they get specific threats, fair enough, specific action should be taken but i don't see why they should have highly expensive protection just to make them feel cosier in their beds.
    The proffessionals have made their assesment and have decided that his life or health would be at risk. We have a duty to protect a citizen of the country. That's it.
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    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    There are plenty of facilities and services available to help battered women; most of the time, however, they don't want them.
    There were some facilities available years ago. Large numbers of shelters, etc have since been closed so there aren't actually 'plenty'.
    In the case of domestic violence as in this case, prevention is better than cure. 15? Why was he chasing this lad in the first place? Why did he have a knife? Why did he murder someone trying to protect the lad he was chasing?
    I don't know if youth crime has increased or if it's just reported more, but all the same it's pretty worrying, and a solution doesn't appear to be forthcoming.
    Kill/execute a murderer? Then how are you better than them? You're just demonstrating an equal disregard for human life.
    Minimum sentence in prison? That person needs to be provided and paid for, even after they've been released (in this case, for example) and it doesn't exactly serve as an effective deterrent.

    I would suggest that the numbers of 'real born' killers or similar-you know, actual nutters who want to kill and hurt people for the sake of it- makes up quite a small proportion of the prison inmate sector. The rest are products of an upbringing which never taught them any different, or had no real power over them.

    My tuppence. I don't have any answers, just theories.
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    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    There are plenty of facilities and services available to help battered women; most of the time, however, they don't want them.
    Facilities is not the same as an around-the-clock police escort.
 
 
 
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