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    (Original post by L'Autrichienne)
    Having lived almost my entire life being taught American history I've grown a bit tired of it, but I think the Civil War and McKinley assassination are both very interesting. The rivalry between Burr and Hamilton, too.
    Mind if I ask you a question, it's one I've always wanted to ask an American student. Please?

    How much foreign history do you actually do? I mean, no offence meant, but American history goes back, what, 400 years maximum?
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    (Original post by Mrgd291190)
    Mind if I ask you a question, it's one I've always wanted to ask an American student. Please?

    How much foreign history do you actually do? I mean, no offence meant, but American history goes back, what, 400 years maximum?
    No, that's fine!

    I think it depends on the state, but the way it goes in New York is this: you're taught American history and American history alone up until you start high school. There's a bit of ancient history mixed in there, as well as some European stuff (I remember a horribly brief explanation of the storming of the Bastille), but it's not a major focus. Then in grades nine and ten you're required to take global history. The first year is mostly ancient civilization and Asian countries, and I think a little bit of Spanish and Portuguese colonial stuff in the Americas. Once you get to tenth grade you learn the European stuff. I opted to take AP European History so I got a pretty in-depth education on it, but the global classes got more of a survey than anything else. I remember trying to help my friend study and I'm pretty sure he didn't know who Voltaire even was, which was astonishing to me as the Enlightenment was a huge focus for us AP kids... but I digress.

    Aside from those two years, though, it's nearly entirely American stuff. I'm surprised they manage to stretch it out so much, but they do it somehow. Unfortunately for me I liked Euro a lot more!
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    (Original post by L'Autrichienne)
    No, that's fine!

    I think it depends on the state, but the way it goes in New York is this: you're taught American history and American history alone up until you start high school. There's a bit of ancient history mixed in there, as well as some European stuff (I remember a horribly brief explanation of the storming of the Bastille), but it's not a major focus. Then in grades nine and ten you're required to take global history. The first year is mostly ancient civilization and Asian countries, and I think a little bit of Spanish and Portuguese colonial stuff in the Americas. Once you get to tenth grade you learn the European stuff. I opted to take AP European History so I got a pretty in-depth education on it, but the global classes got more of a survey than anything else. I remember trying to help my friend study and I'm pretty sure he didn't know who Voltaire even was, which was astonishing to me as the Enlightenment was a huge focus for us AP kids... but I digress.

    Aside from those two years, though, it's nearly entirely American stuff. I'm surprised they manage to stretch it out so much, but they do it somehow. Unfortunately for me I liked Euro a lot more!
    Lol, thanks for the info

    Interesting. I mean, I'm sure you know the stereotype of no American knowing anything about the world across the Atlantic or Pacific but you actually seem to have done more than me
    I'm Welsh and we've only done a year of Welsh history and that was about Year 8. We've done a lot of British in the main eras though, Tudors and the like. We did a course of American (and German WWII) about Year 10-11 and that was cool. We did America from the Wall Street Crash until 1990 so quite a bit! I don't really remember what I did as a kid, I read a lot anyway so it all blurs into one, we did a bit of ancient then. I don't actually think we've done any Asian history, I'd love to do Japan....nor did we do much Conquistador history.
    Very interesting, I must say. At the moment we're mainly doing the backstory to the World Wars and the like, hope to find out what I've got next year soon!

    I have to say, I liked Euro too Find it very diverse and so inordinately long :eek: But American is great, amazing how much you lot have packed in to 400 years

    I'll have to rep you soon, might take a while
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    (Original post by Mrgd291190)
    Lol, thanks for the info

    Interesting. I mean, I'm sure you know the stereotype of no American knowing anything about the world across the Atlantic or Pacific but you actually seem to have done more than me
    I'm Welsh and we've only done a year of Welsh history and that was about Year 8. We've done a lot of British in the main eras though, Tudors and the like. We did a course of American (and German WWII) about Year 10-11 and that was cool. We did America from the Wall Street Crash until 1990 so quite a bit! I don't really remember what I did as a kid, I read a lot anyway so it all blurs into one, we did a bit of ancient then. I don't actually think we've done any Asian history, I'd love to do Japan....nor did we do much Conquistador history.
    Very interesting, I must say. At the moment we're mainly doing the backstory to the World Wars and the like, hope to find out what I've got next year soon!

    I have to say, I liked Euro too Find it very diverse and so inordinately long :eek: But American is great, amazing how much you lot have packed in to 400 years

    I'll have to rep you soon, might take a while
    Ah, yes... definitely am familiar with that one. Glad to know I don't seem that way though!

    I've actually never done any Welsh history. I never really thought about it, either, but now I might have to do some research on my own. When I took Euro a lot of it was English, French, German, and (to a lesser extent) Russian history with other stuff spoken about as needed. I never really took a keen interest in English history, though, so I kind of blocked that out; I was more into the French revolution and such. But yeah, WWII is really interesting, and modern American's alright. Unfortunately I've grown to sort of despise American history altogether as I had a completely incompetent teacher this year... fortunately I tested out of US Gov for next year so I get to take whatever social studies course I like. Psych & military history here I come!

    It is true, though, that we've been pretty productive. Euro is SO much more rich, though, and everybody is so much more crazy and radical than us Americans will ever be (and I mean that as a compliment).
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    (Original post by L'Autrichienne)
    Ah, yes... definitely am familiar with that one. Glad to know I don't seem that way though!

    I've actually never done any Welsh history. I never really thought about it, either, but now I might have to do some research on my own. When I took Euro a lot of it was English, French, German, and (to a lesser extent) Russian history with other stuff spoken about as needed. I never really took a keen interest in English history, though, so I kind of blocked that out; I was more into the French revolution and such. But yeah, WWII is really interesting, and modern American's alright. Unfortunately I've grown to sort of despise American history altogether as I had a completely incompetent teacher this year... fortunately I tested out of US Gov for next year so I get to take whatever social studies course I like. Psych & military history here I come!

    It is true, though, that we've been pretty productive. Euro is SO much more rich, though, and everybody is so much more crazy and radical than us Americans will ever be (and I mean that as a compliment).
    Lol, don't worry about it, it's not very major, or very modern. Useful if you have a vested interest like us welshies.
    LOVE the French Revolution, never studied it. We're back to WWI-WWII-Stalin again for another year...it's good but we've done it all before, three years in a row!
    OOH Psych and military history sounds amazing, I want to study it

    Lol, yeah, we do have some nutters...myself included
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    (Original post by Gemma_08)
    (This isn't anyting academic so I decided not to post it in the History thread.)

    Lately, I have been reading a lot over American History, and I find it absolutely amazing! I studied the Kennedy Assassination for GCSEs and I was intrigued by it. Then I started to find interest in Ancient History and especially Egyptian history, and American history took a back seat. Recently, I saw National Trasure: Book of Secrets and although I know it is a fantasy adventure about a treasure and all that jazz, I found the Lincoln assassination fascinating.

    I started this thread to find out what other parts of American history there are that you guys are interested in, and as I love to broaden my knowledge, it would be great for some more interesting facts about historic American figures.
    Hey, that's so refreshing to hear that you are passionate about history. American history is definately interesting, but I'd say America is still in the process of defining its history.

    Whilst lots of people have mentioned Russia (it is a deeply fascinating country, culturally and politically), I can only reccommend that you delve into some Latin American history. I became interested after the death of the Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, and I couldn't get enough of it! The conquistadores are fascinating, as well as the socialist bloc of countries in Latin America during the twentieth century, not to mention Cuba! There's also that link between the USA and Latin America, in terms of its foreign policy and supporting of military coups.
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    (Original post by jonboyyork)
    Hey, that's so refreshing to hear that you are passionate about history. American history is definately interesting, but I'd say America is still in the process of defining its history.

    Whilst lots of people have mentioned Russia (it is a deeply fascinating country, culturally and politically), I can only reccommend that you delve into some Latin American history. I became interested after the death of the Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, and I couldn't get enough of it! The conquistadores are fascinating, as well as the socialist bloc of countries in Latin America during the twentieth century, not to mention Cuba! There's also that link between the USA and Latin America, in terms of its foreign policy and supporting of military coups.
    We studied the Cuban missile crisis in GCSE, that was really coooooool

    Latin American history you say? That does sound interesting. What specific part of its history would you recommend?

    http://www.lib.washington.edu/subjec.../tm/latin.html
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    (Original post by Gemma_08)
    We studied the Cuban missile crisis in GCSE, that was really coooooool

    Latin American history you say? That does sound interesting. What specific part of its history would you recommend?

    http://www.lib.washington.edu/subjec.../tm/latin.html
    Chile and the United States, but you could also look into Chile's colonial past, it really is a country of extremes at both ends of a spectrum. But the most striking feature of Chile's history has to be the Pinochet years, and the murderous terror and political oppression that occured. I mean, children were actually being attached to weights and thrown into lakes by Pinochet loyalists. Read Being Luis: A Chilean Life by Luis Munoz, if you want to get a better understanding of life in Chile under a dictatorship, however bad the narrative is!

    The missiles crisis was a scary moment in history, but there's also Castro's Cuba (yes I'm more into social history) and you could assess his reign; was he a dictator or saviour or Cuba?

    Then there's Mexico's Revolution, and activism of students in the 1960s.
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    (Original post by jonboyyork)
    Chile and the United States, but you could also look into Chile's colonial past, it really is a country of extremes at both ends of a spectrum. But the most striking feature of Chile's history has to be the Pinochet years, and the murderous terror and political oppression that occured. I mean, children were actually being attached to weights and thrown into lakes by Pinochet loyalists. Read Being Luis: A Chilean Life by Luis Munoz, if you want to get a better understanding of life in Chile under a dictatorship, however bad the narrative is!

    The missiles crisis was a scary moment in history, but there's also Castro's Cuba (yes I'm more into social history) and you could assess his reign; was he a dictator or saviour or Cuba?

    Then there's Mexico's Revolution, and activism of students in the 1960s.
    Being Luis is going for £5 on Amazon. I shall buy it and get back to you

    Yes Castro's Cuba is fascinating, I did a lot of research of that in depth. I haven't read a lot about Mexico's Revolution, I shall put that on my to-do list

    Thank you for all of this by the way. It is really helping me to increase my knowledge in other aspects of History, these topics are usually overlooked in secondary schools. There is just so much Nazism and Fascism, that they tend to leave out interesting and important landmarks in history such as the Latin American history. Thanks again
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    I've just done a 100 years of Russian history, it was alright to begin with but after Stalin I found it was starting to drag.
    I love American history, in particular the immigration of the late 1800s and early 1900s, I love the idea of moving to a great unexplored land. It is a shame nearly everywhere has been explored now!
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    (Original post by Mrgd291190)
    LOVE the French Revolution, never studied it.
    This is blasphemy, surely!
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    Oh--and now that we're onto Latin America a bit, I feel it's appropriate to proclaim my love for Simon Bolivar. Sideburns of legend, really.
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    (Original post by L'Autrichienne)
    Oh--and now that we're onto Latin America a bit, I feel it's appropriate to proclaim my love for Simon Bolivar. Sideburns of legend, really.
    Ahh. Just Googled him I can see what you mean...
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    (Original post by L'Autrichienne)
    This is blasphemy, surely!
    Tragic I know

    I've read a lot about it, read the Count of Monte Cristo and going to buy a couple of books on it (+ a Rousseau book) so I'm hoping to learn more.

    When I went to Paris I saw "Liberty Leading the People" by Delacroix so that's got to count for something
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    Whoops, I've made a digusting omission! Che Guevara, even if his legend is romanticised.
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    Argentinian military dictatorship :love:. Fascinating.
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    (Original post by brimstone)
    Argentinian military dictatorship :love:. Fascinating.
    Yes, indeed, and Argentina's ''Dirty War.'' And even now in Latin America, history is being made/ We have a duumverate of female presidents, Bachelet for Chile and Kirchner for Argentina.
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    though it seems to be overlooked by some of the very own citizens, the most interesting and most important war in U.S. History in defining it today is the Civil War. more men died in the civil war than WW1, WW2, korean war, vietnam war, and both gulf wars combined. it is sadest war, sadest even, worst event, triumphet event...today is effected by choices and decisions of that war (all wars really). and the means of actually getting to the Civil War actually spand decades before.

    American Revolution is of coarse important because that brings us to actually having USA rather 13 seperated soveriegnties of coarse.

    WW2 is the most defined war in world history as well. no other war really broke into good vs bad so well.
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    American History rules to summarise.
 
 
 
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