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    Which of the Ballads did Coleridge write except Rime of the Ancient Mariner? Bit annoying my book does not say. :X
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    (Original post by inrainbows)
    I have four exams in three days and I need an A for uni so I'm kind of running round going ARGH!!!!!!!!!!
    I have 4 exams in three days, and after that 3 exams on one day
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    (Original post by FoeGeddaBowDeet)
    Which of the Ballads did Coleridge write except Rime of the Ancient Mariner? Bit annoying my book does not say. :X
    nightingale, foster mother, the dungeon
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    Anyone got any themes/ideas for "the Dungeon"?. All I've got is seclusion and a sort of 'divorce' from nature...
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    Life and happiness
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    (Original post by dukeofdarkcorners)
    Anyone got any themes/ideas for "the Dungeon"?. All I've got is seclusion and a sort of 'divorce' from nature...
    social reform? it's pretty revolutionary saying that people shouldn't go to prison especially considering the date.
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    Dukeofdarkcorners..

    I don't have many notes, but what might be of help is the fact that there is a small theme of religion running through the poem, in which the actions of God are being questioned "Is this the only cure? Merciful God!" This makes referance to his physical state, asking at what point did God allow people to be treated so badly. Also the suggestion of a personal comment made by Colderidge is a point that could be added, almost as a way of rebelling against the 'norm' of constantly obeying to God.

    Again, in the last stanza, there is a softer tone when mentioning being healed (which occurs a few times throughout the collection) and a Christian influence is included in a prayer-like manner:
    "Thou pourest on him thy soft influences,
    Thy sunny hues, fair forms, and breathing sweets,
    Thy melodies of woods, and winds, and waters"

    Additionally, syballance emphasises the semantic field of nature which is largely in this part of the stanza.

    Not much info, but hope that helps
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    Thanks a lot guys, really great stuff
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    (Original post by dukeofdarkcorners)
    Anyone got any themes/ideas for "the Dungeon"?. All I've got is seclusion and a sort of 'divorce' from nature...
    Kudos for 'Measure for Measure' quote username

    I haven't really read the dungeon so can't comment.
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    (Original post by inrainbows)
    I think the supernatural could come up...Rime of the Ancient Mariner has loads of it...
    I don't reckon supernatural would come up by itself, although it may be part of the question. In January both the questions said "referring to at least 3 poems in the collection" so you couldn't only talk about Rime.
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    if supernatural comes up i think it will tie in with imagination which is actually quite a nice question because it's so broad that you're bound to find something
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    (Original post by markdr)
    I don't reckon supernatural would come up by itself, although it may be part of the question. In January both the questions said "referring to at least 3 poems in the collection" so you couldn't only talk about Rime.
    I think supernatural/imagination could come up. Many poems champion imagination over reason.
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    yeah

    if it does come up remember wordsworth was more inclined towards imagination while coleridge was focused on the supernatural
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    Don't forget the lovely preface for the lyrical ballads for context. Ahh good old Wordsworth ****ging off Coleridge and making him go into a crazy drug induced state...who needs enemies eh lol

    Also context stuff we've been told to look at stuff to do with what the Romantics stood for ie-Mother =goddess figure, going against the Classical Period, French Revolution, Rousseau (Social Contract, Man is born free but everywhere in chains, Noble Savage), Believed that adults ruined children's innocence, obsessed with Education, Peak District etc

    I can so do context but this poncy poetry does not stay in my head AT ALL!!!
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    (Original post by willenium)
    yeah

    if it does come up remember wordsworth was more inclined towards imagination while coleridge was focused on the supernatural
    :yy:

    I think that would be a good question...
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    thinking about ending my essay 'in conclusion, wordsworth was a pansy and a premature hippy and coleridge was a smack head jesus freak and their success as romantic poets is undermined by the fact that they died old and cynical, rather than young and beautiful like keats.'
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    That would be immense, you may get extra marks for an 'individual response'
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    (Original post by FoeGeddaBowDeet)
    Which of the Ballads did Coleridge write except Rime of the Ancient Mariner? Bit annoying my book does not say. :X
    He did 4 in the book and I know its completely annoying it doesn't say who did what. Well he did

    Marinere
    Foster Mothers Tale (extract from play)
    Dungeon (soliloquy from same play)
    The Nightingale

    thinking about ending my essay 'in conclusion, wordsworth was a pansy and a premature hippy and coleridge was a smack head jesus freak and their success as romantic poets is undermined by the fact that they died old and cynical, rather than young and beautiful like keats.'
    haha I'd give it an A
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    (Original post by Ed.)
    That would be immense, you may get extra marks for an 'individual response'
    Yeah, as in 1/20 instead of 0/20, lol.
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    The poems were revolutionary because they are some of the first of theyre kind, they are all about human passions, human incidents and human characters. They also use simplistic language which is atypical of the poems of that time where controversial and often formal language is used.

    exam tomorrow, just found out its closed book and im DYING >
 
 
 
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