If prison is so easy apparently Watch

Louisdf
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#41
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#41
(Original post by 713)
I think it is because you are locked up. It's a horrible feeling when you know you can't leave a certain area for some time. If you're homeless you can at least go wherever you want to (ok not everywhere but I can't go everywhere I want to either)


Yes but only a minority of prisoners serve the full sentence because there's "not enough space" in prisons, and also they get released at christmas too.
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gm15
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#42
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(Original post by Louisdf)
Yes but only a minority of prisoners serve the full sentence because there's "not enough space" in prisons, and also they get released at christmas too.
Also a minority of prisons are open prisions - kind of against the point isn't it?
If the Home and justice offices are capable of coming up with an idea as soft and stupid as open prisons don't you wonder how soft they must be in the closed prisons?
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Formica
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#43
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(Original post by unikq)
what's your point? that because they can't get drugs and alcohol, that prisons work? such people who offend under the influence of such things should go into forced rehab, not prison.
What are you talking about? I'm not arguing whether prisons work or not :confused:
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unikq
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#44
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(Original post by Formica)
What are you talking about? I'm not arguing whether prisons work or not :confused:
i don't know what you were arguing lol - just saw drugs, alcohol, deprivation of both in prisons, thought you were saying that prisons worked because they don't get their daily skunk in prison
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zeropoint
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#45
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(Original post by Louisdf)
That's because our police here have to fill in forms all the time, and TARGETS-catching someone who litters is the same as catching a murderer.
148 per 100000 people are incarcerated in England and Wales. 1 in 100 people are incarcerated in America; I think that is a little more than bureaucratic efficiency.

Back to the broader issue, would one solution be to remove a prisoner's right sue their captors, providing prisons were still monitored by HM's Inspectorate for Prisons. This would prevent real cruelty to the prisoners, but allow prisons to be slightly less accommodating without the fear of legal retribution.
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gm15
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#46
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(Original post by zeropoint)
148 per 100000 people are incarcerated in England and Wales. 1 in 100 people are incarcerated in America; I think that is a little more than bureaucratic efficiency.

Back to the broader issue, would one solution be to remove a prisoner's right sue their captors, providing prisons were still monitored by HM's Inspectorate for Prisons. This would prevent real cruelty to the prisoners, but allow prisons to be slightly less accommodating without the fear of legal retribution.
Didn't a prisoner once sue the gov for not provideing hime with a medical substitute for his illegal drug habit?
You know things are going wrong when a prisoner thinks that methadone is a right.
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ch0c0h01ic
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Sabertooth)
Particularly serious crimes. Huntley for instance is in solitary and guards are told to treat him nicely, so the homeless person wouldn't have to mix with regular criminals roots mentions. That's why I originally said murder rather than just shoplifting.
...but it isn't because of the severity of his crime, it's for his protection (from other inmates as well as himself), and/or he's been misbehaving/breaking prison rules. He may be locked up with all of the other rapists, paedophiles, sex pests, etc, but even some criminals have a grasp of right and wrong (and ideas on how to enforce it).
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zeropoint
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#48
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In Ian Huntley's case the guards were told to 'be nice' because Huntley was clinically depressed, has attempted suicide by overdose three times, and has been attacked by fellow inmates before. It was calculated that it costs £1128 per day to keep Ian Huntley at Her Majesties pleasure.

You could employ a small handful of teachers on that, or a small platoon of council workers...
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gm15
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#49
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Overdose?
But surely if he needs medication its dished out by the prison in the exact and safe dose he needs? What did they do just trustungly hand him a big bottle of paracetemol
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Sabertooth
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#50
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#50
(Original post by zeropoint)
In Ian Huntley's case the guards were told to 'be nice' because Huntley was clinically depressed, has attempted suicide by overdose three times, and has been attacked by fellow inmates before. It was calculated that it costs £1128 per day to keep Ian Huntley at Her Majesties pleasure.

You could employ a small handful of teachers on that, or a small platoon of council workers...
Shame we can't help him out with the suicide.

(Original post by gm15)
Overdose?
But surely if he needs medication its dished out by the prison in the exact and safe dose he needs? What did they do just trustungly hand him a big bottle of paracetemol
Pretends to take the pills then just stores them up.
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gm15
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#51
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
Pretends to take the pills then just stores them up.
Oh. Well tha tmakes sense. Stupid me.
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lolimemma
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#52
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
Particularly serious crimes. Huntley for instance is in solitary and guards are told to treat him nicely.
You're referring to the Daily Mail article I assume? If he killed himself in prison they'd have an even bigger field day in criticising the prison service by saying prisoners didn't receive adequate protection.
And for the record, he's in Frankland so it's not just him that has his own cell. EVERY prisoner there does so it's not like he's getting any specific special treatment in relation to that.

Source?
http://www.hmprisonservice.gov.uk/pr...,15,2,15,396,0

Personally, I think that the loss of freedom and ability to see friends and family etc is a higher price to pay than getting a free bed for the night.
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steelmole
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#53
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The punishment of prison is taking away your freedom, not making life really difficult. Even so prison is not a nice place, whatever the Daily Mail keeps on saying.
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gm15
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#54
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(Original post by steelmole)
The punishment of prison is taking away your freedom, not making life really difficult. Even so prison is not a nice place, whatever the Daily Mail keeps on saying.
No my friend it is both. If you take away somebodies freedom but still let them live a cushy lifestyle then its not much of a punishment.
And yes I know there's a lot of nasty things about prison but what are we meant to do? Short of giving every prisoner their own suite incluiding a bed area, a bathroom, somewhere to eat and a mini exercise yard it is impossible to stop bullying and other nasties from happening.
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lincs_b
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#55
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#55
(Original post by unikq)
i don't think that's how it works...
they won't offend to GO to prison, they are probably more likely to offend because they are angry and emotionally insecure.
No honestly some do prefer it on the inside. They may not offend the 1st time to go to prison but after that some do. I knew someone who went to prison and he already knew allot of the inmates as they had grown up together.
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unikq
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#56
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(Original post by lincs_b)
No honestly some do prefer it on the inside. They may not offend the 1st time to go to prison but after that some do. I knew someone who went to prison and he already knew allot of the inmates as they had grown up together.
that's really sad. why is the government not doing anything about it, once again?
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Jabbamuffin
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#57
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#57
(Original post by Fusion)
Homeless people have morals
I'd rather have a house than be homeless and have morals.



Why... Because they're too lazy and probably enjoy what little freedom they have.
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frankie_sez_relax
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#58
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#58
(Original post by jacketpotato)
Wow, you say that prison is nice and easy for Ian Huntley because he has a CD player, freeview and a GameCube?

What are you suggesting? That people should be kept in solitary confinement with absolutely nothing to entertain them so everyone in prison goes mad within a year?
Yes. What has he done to deserve any modern comfort? He took the lives of two girls and he deserves a rough existence.
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frankie_sez_relax
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#59
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#59
(Original post by Sabertooth)
Shame we can't help (ian huntley) out with the suicide.
I'd rather he rotted in jail for 50 years. I'd rather be dead then spend 50 years alone.
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happydinosaur
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#60
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I don't believe that prison is easy. I have seen that prison is not easy. Spent a year learning about prison for a module at uni and recently went into prison (cat B local prison) for a day to work with a group of prisoners doing some drama and stuff. Yeh people get things like playstations in prison but only after they earn the privilege, all about the rehabilitation process, if you are good do what you should do then you gradually earn more things. A lot of prisoners have hardly anything. One guy I chatted to told me that he buys lots of shower gel from the shop and lines it up on his shelf because it makes him feel like he has possessions. Going into prison and spending time with them was an amazing experience for me and a real eye opener. Most of them spend their days working in the prison or in education of some form. Unlike what the papers say nobody spends the day sitting around playing on an X-box and when the papers do talk of such possessions they are referring to either those who have earned it or those in lower category prisons.

[QUOTE-gm15]Also a minority of prisons are open prisions - kind of against the point isn't it?
If the Home and justice offices are capable of coming up with an idea as soft and stupid as open prisons don't you wonder how soft they must be in the closed prisons[/QUOTE]

a lot of open prison inmates have been through the high security prisons and the open prison is used as a means of gradually returning them to a life outside.

Anyone read any of Erwin James' Guardian columns about life inside? I'm reading his book about his prison experiences, now that is a good read if you want a real inside view of prison life.
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