Cambridge Special Access Scheme HELP!!! Watch

epitome
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#41
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#41
Good luck, Terry J.
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Terry J
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#42
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#42
Thanks epitome!
I'll need it!!
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Tyler Durden
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Ekpyrotic)
Are you trolling?
No need for that. To the OP, apply what's the worst that can happen? Now, i must go to 'alculate'.
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Terry J
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#44
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#44
WHY! should I apply!!
It would just be a waste of a place which could be used for a uni which I stand a reasonable chance of getting into!

Cambridge will say - "NO! we dn't have a place for you"
whereas
Stirling might well say "Sure! if you get CCC" (which is more attainable than AAA)

I don't want to waste a place just to be told "NO!"
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#45
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(Original post by shunter7634)
Maybe 40-45 hours, including contact time? Of course, this greatly varies by subject, and also by the ability of the student and how well they are able to understand the material.
You must be having a giraffe, 6 hours a day EVERY day? I don't know a single person that gets anywhere near that, short of freakish MPhil students nearing their thesis deadline or when it gets to exam-mentalness period. A normal working week is much less than that for the vast majority of students.
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epitome
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#46
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(Original post by Cantab)
You must be having a giraffe, 6 hours a day EVERY day? I don't know a single person that gets anywhere near that, short of freakish MPhil students nearing their thesis deadline or when it gets to exam-mentalness period. A normal working week is much less than that for the vast majority of students.
Well, he never claimed it was absolute.

Anyway, 6 hours a day? That's perfectly manageable, and perfectly normal. I know a great many people who very happily do that much every day, and who feel very unproductive and lazy if they accidentally do less (NB: different to deciding to take a day off). Fitting in 6 hours is not in the slightest bit difficult.
Indeed, anyone doing much less could probably do with just having a real think about (a) what they're doing at university (if it's just to get a degree, fine; if it's to get one of the best educations around...not so fine, I think), and (b) just how much debt they're getting in whilst doing very little.
The only time I *don't* think that is when people are filling their time with genuinely worthwhile other activities -- whether that's theatre or rowing, organisation or admin, music or charity work, or setting up a business, or writing poetry...that's fine. But not just wasting the time.

End of rant.
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#47
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(Original post by epitome)
Well, he never claimed it was absolute.

Anyway, 6 hours a day? That's perfectly manageable, and perfectly normal. I know a great many people who very happily do that much every day, and who feel very unproductive and lazy if they accidentally do less (NB: different to deciding to take a day off). Fitting in 6 hours is not in the slightest bit difficult.
Indeed, anyone doing much less could probably do with just having a real think about (a) what they're doing at university (if it's just to get a degree, fine; if it's to get one of the best educations around...not so fine, I think), and (b) just how much debt they're getting in whilst doing very little.
The only time I *don't* think that is when people are filling their time with genuinely worthwhile other activities -- whether that's theatre or rowing, organisation or admin, music or charity work, or setting up a business, or writing poetry...that's fine. But not just wasting the time.

End of rant.

I'm not questioning a 6 hour day, of course that's easy, I'm questioning 6 hours a day EVERY day, or, if you take a 'weekend', 9 hours a day. Your ethos sounds like a recipe for burning out while still incredibly young - the only time you're not working is when you're doing productive things? What about eating? Sleeping? Socialising? Playing sport? Relaxing? Going out and getting completely battered? I didn't come to university to work myself into the ground, I came to thoroughly enjoy myself as much as I could - which helpfully involves studying a subject I love. Working an extra 15-20 hours a week may improve my grades by 5-6%, and secure that all-important first, but I'm sure it wouldn't be worth the degradation in the quality of life I currently enjoy. I can honestly say I don't know a single person in my college that works that hard in the first two terms of the year (possibly because those that DO work that hard don't have time to emerge from their rooms).
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Lidka
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#48
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(Original post by Cantab)
I'm not questioning a 6 hour day, of course that's easy, I'm questioning 6 hours a day EVERY day, or, if you take a 'weekend', 9 hours a day. Your ethos sounds like a recipe for burning out while still incredibly young - the only time you're not working is when you're doing productive things? What about eating? Sleeping? Socialising? Playing sport? Relaxing? Going out and getting completely battered? I didn't come to university to work myself into the ground, I came to thoroughly enjoy myself as much as I could - which helpfully involves studying a subject I love. Working an extra 15-20 hours a week may improve my grades by 5-6%, and secure that all-important first, but I'm sure it wouldn't be worth the degradation in the quality of life I currently enjoy. I can honestly say I don't know a single person in my college that works that hard in the first two terms of the year (possibly because those that DO work that hard don't have time to emerge from their rooms).
(Original post by epitome)
Well, he never claimed it was absolute.

Anyway, 6 hours a day? That's perfectly manageable, and perfectly normal. I know a great many people who very happily do that much every day, and who feel very unproductive and lazy if they accidentally do less (NB: different to deciding to take a day off). Fitting in 6 hours is not in the slightest bit difficult.
Indeed, anyone doing much less could probably do with just having a real think about (a) what they're doing at university (if it's just to get a degree, fine; if it's to get one of the best educations around...not so fine, I think), and (b) just how much debt they're getting in whilst doing very little.
The only time I *don't* think that is when people are filling their time with genuinely worthwhile other activities -- whether that's theatre or rowing, organisation or admin, music or charity work, or setting up a business, or writing poetry...that's fine. But not just wasting the time.

End of rant.
Different things work for different people. If it's possible, I think you're both right, Cantab and epitome. :p: It's important to have fun as it is to take time off. There's no 'right' working system, and I'm really skeptical of people who can count their working time in hours - what is an hour of work? An hour of essay writing? An hour of reading? With facebook breaks, or without? Do you stop to make tea, check your emails - is it then still an hour? It's just so hard to judge. I have friends who did bugger all this year, and friends who worked themselves to near insanity and illness, but who am I to say one got it 'right' and one got it 'wrong'? I certainly didn't do 40 hours a week (and I don't mind if my DoS reads this; she knows :p:) and I certainly didn't spend the rest of that time doing much constructive, in the immediate sense. But, that was my choice, and it kept me sane during some pretty difficult periods. I like to think that's what a degree is about - being able to choose your priorities, now you're finally out of the school environment. Do you see it differently?
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epitome
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#49
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(Original post by Cantab)
I'm not questioning a 6 hour day, of course that's easy, I'm questioning 6 hours a day EVERY day, or, if you take a 'weekend', 9 hours a day. Your ethos sounds like a recipe for burning out while still incredibly young - the only time you're not working is when you're doing productive things? What about eating? Sleeping? Socialising? Playing sport? Relaxing? Going out and getting completely battered? I didn't come to university to work myself into the ground, I came to thoroughly enjoy myself as much as I could - which helpfully involves studying a subject I love. Working an extra 15-20 hours a week may improve my grades by 5-6%, and secure that all-important first, but I'm sure it wouldn't be worth the degradation in the quality of life I currently enjoy. I can honestly say I don't know a single person in my college that works that hard in the first two terms of the year (possibly because those that DO work that hard don't have time to emerge from their rooms).
Actually, I think we might agree about something that I didn't mention in my post, but which Lidka quite sensibly brings up: the Counting of Hours. I didn't mean to say that people should clock-watch and berate themselves if they do 15 minutes less, and neither did I mean that people should stick to a rigid structure. Rather, my emphasis is on the simple fact that it's easy to fit in 6 hours of work every day without even thinking much about having to fit it in. As Lidka says, 'what's an hour?' -- it's a good question. An hour, for me, is not a clock-watched one, and nor is it particularly interrupted. But then perhaps I'm lucky in that the hours slip by pretty easily. I know someone who schedules every single 15 minute slot in a day (no, really), and she also feels *awful* if she doesn't do her 8-hours-of-work-every-single-day. That's a bit worrying, perhaps.

It seems we do actually think pretty similar things, here, just we articulate it differently. Though I don't think that 6 hours of work most days (less some, more some) is exactly a recipe for burnout at all. 6 hours is nothing, but it gets an awful lot done.

As for the fun stuff...yes, I'm all for that. And I do a lot of it (though not the getting pissed bit. I think it's really boring, and also don't like the wasted half-day the next morning!). Should probably say, though, that I'm one of those people who's always doing *something*. And I also count many of my extra-curriculars (well, the non-admin ones!) as part of my social life -- I don't differentiate between music/sport and pub or DVD, for example, because I'm still with the people I like, and still having a laugh.
The general bumming around doing very little, though, is not something I do much of. That's not a moral judgement, by the way, it's just because I'm a bit too hyperactive to do it!

Everyone has different routines and different priorities, and that's absolutely fine. But it does annoy me a wee bit when people do sod-all, *and* do very little work. It works differently for all of us, but I find the more I do extra-curricularly and socially, the more work I tend to squeeze in around the corners. Like you, I'm lucky to be doing a degree I love; and at the end of a busy day full of other people and other things, it's very often a great relief to be able to get back to a good book or an interesting essay.

Sometimes, though, it's far better to head to the nearest friends, DVD & take-away...
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Ruthie_J
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#50
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I, for one, work hard because I actually enjoy my course and love reading for it!! Call me a geek, but I easily do 6 hours every day when averaged out! Yes, I'll make sure that I take a whole day off a week, but otherwise I manage my time really well, especially in exam term. I still get all the 'fun stuff' too - I've never pulled an all-nighter, never worked past 1am, and usually get to the bar around 9.30 every night!
Like epitome said, everyone has different routines and different priorities.

What I CAN'T ABIDE on the other hand, is people denying the fact that they work, when they're blatantly clocking up the hours. Why do some people feel like they have to keep up the appearance of someone who coasts through their degree with minimum effort?! If you make a song and dance about how little you work, usually its because you're on the defensive. Leave people to work how they like.

Ok, rant over....
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epitome
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#51
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*grins*
Good to see we're all having a little rant about this.
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priya
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Ruthie_J)
I, for one, work hard because I actually enjoy my course and love reading for it!! Call me a geek, but I easily do 6 hours every day when averaged out! Yes, I'll make sure that I take a whole day off a week, but otherwise I manage my time really well, especially in exam term. I still get all the 'fun stuff' too - I've never pulled an all-nighter, never worked past 1am, and usually get to the bar around 9.30 every night!
Like epitome said, everyone has different routines and different priorities.

What I CAN'T ABIDE on the other hand, is people denying the fact that they work, when they're blatantly clocking up the hours. Why do some people feel like they have to keep up the appearance of someone who coasts through their degree with minimum effort?! If you make a song and dance about how little you work, usually its because you're on the defensive. Leave people to work how they like.

Ok, rant over....

GEEEEEEEK

There are also those (particularly in first year) who announce the completion of their 13hr hardcoremental day, every day. I'm glad first year exams normally knock some sense into them, and they dissolve by final year. They're well annoying people to deal with, though.

Cantab - think of a 50hr week as this: 9-6 Mon-Fri (with lunch break) plus 5 hours each on Saturday and Sunday. That leaves every evening free plus a bit more. And 50hrs is probably what most finalists do in Lent term onwards.
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epitome
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#53
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(Original post by priya)
I'm glad first year exams normally knock some sense into them, and they dissolve by final year.
I love the way Cambridge tends to destroy work ethic...
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shunter7634
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#54
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(Original post by Cantab)
You must be having a giraffe, 6 hours a day EVERY day? I don't know a single person that gets anywhere near that, short of freakish MPhil students nearing their thesis deadline or when it gets to exam-mentalness period. A normal working week is much less than that for the vast majority of students.
In exam term I was doing a lot more than that. The other terms, it was less, maybe about 35 hours a week (in Michaelmas I had 20 hours a week of contact time, and then 15 of work by myself). But, on average of the people I know, 40-45 hours a week seems to be about average. As pointed out by someone else, if you break it down, it's not that much.
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the_13th
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#55
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No.

(yes, it's probably not your fault and I feel very sorry for you, but I would not rely upon their sympathy. It would be irrational and therefore extremely unlikely, if they considered you at all, let alone giving you an offer.
Normally Special Access knocks off a couple of points off the normal offer. You still need to be a high-achiever.

For instance, they could offer you ABB instead of A*AA, but if you're talking about D's, it would be too naive to hope.

So NO. sorry
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usingtsr
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#56
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#56
I know this scheme is normally for people in school/college who may have, or actually have underperformed in GCSEs/A levels because of health/personal reasons.

I'm applying post-A level (not mature) and I was wondering whether I should suggest to my tutor applying under the Scheme, since I pretty much meet the criteria for it and would be able to get doctor's notes etc. But as far as the Cambridge site says, it's not a scheme for post A level, is it? So my first question is - am I eligible as a post-A level applicant?

Most of my education has been extremely disrupted. Most notably was my GCSEs, though I came out with 2 A*, 8 A, and 1 B. Would it be worth applying under the Scheme to account for those grades? (I do realise they aren't that bad). I'm more concerned about my A levels, I got AAAbce. How about in this case? Is it worth it?

The main thing I was wondering was that I've dropped out of uni after getting poor results in my first year exams. My tutor has already promised that they will make it very clear in their reference that my application should be based on A levels alone and not performance at uni since I have such a long list of 'mitigating circumstances'. Would I 1) be able to use the CSAS for this and 2) even need to, given it'll be in my reference?

Thanks in advance for any help

tl;dr
Can post A level applicants go through the CSAS?
Can they state that their previous uni studies were disrupted?
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Kobie
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#57
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email admissions, those guys are super helpful
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zarazara
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#58
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#58
Hey sounds alarming..... Even I am going to apply after completing A levels under this scheme, after taking a gap year. I think it shouldn't matter but I am not sure since you were in Uni...... The best thing will be to email them your situation and get an honest advice. I did the same and they told me my circumstances make me eligible for it.... Are you sure that you have to produce documents.... My situation is where I cannot produce documents.....
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usingtsr
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#59
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#59
(Original post by zarazara)
Hey sounds alarming..... Even I am going to apply after completing A levels under this scheme, after taking a gap year. I think it shouldn't matter but I am not sure since you were in Uni...... The best thing will be to email them your situation and get an honest advice. I did the same and they told me my circumstances make me eligible for it.... Are you sure that you have to produce documents.... My situation is where I cannot produce documents.....
It says somewhere on the site that you only need a doctor's note for physical illness and it needs to say that it definitely affected you.

I'll email the admissions about my sitch then, but in the meantime if anyone else knows anything I'd be very grateful for input.
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usingtsr
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#60
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(Original post by Kobie)
email admissions, those guys are super helpful
should I email the college admissions or the whole of cambridge admissions?
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