I think I might have to drop out :( Help please... Watch

Mush
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#41
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#41
(Original post by suek)
Any chance of taking a year out and working full time back home? People take years out of their degree all the time for varying reasons, I'm sure it wouldn't be a problem. Yes, you'd be postponing your life goal by a year, but it's much better than giving it up entirely.
That should not have to be an option. Students all over the country should not have to be resorting to this. Both the government AND the students were doing perfectly well in the past 20 odd years with the old system of student finance. The only problem now is SAAS' new policies. It's not on.
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x-pixie-lottie-x
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#42
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#42
is there not some cheaper accomodation u can stay in?
n like someone else said work 24/7 through summer...
or ask other relatives for some help maybe? i know this may not be an option but im thinking of anything i can :|
x x x
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Mush
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#43
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#43
(Original post by suek)
It's not actually illegal - some student accounts state in their terms and conditions that they want to be your only student account, or that a regular sum needs to be going into that particular account etc. But it's not breaking the law, just breaking their T&Cs.

Basically, if one bank discovered you're using another and their overdraft (must be fairly easy to find out, only depends if they bother to look I suppose), there's a very good chance they'll ask for the overdraft to repaid in full immediately as they are within their right to do so.
And they'd probably stick a massive interest on it aswell... so I still don't recommend it =\. The risks outweigh the benefits I think.
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suek
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#44
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#44
(Original post by Mush)
And they'd probably stick a massive interest on it aswell... so I still don't recommend it =\. The risks outweigh the benefits I think.
Oh definitely, they just won't end up with a criminal record for it heh
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Blue Rose
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#45
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Are you entitled to a university bursary or anything? They are non-repayable. As is the Access to Learning Fund (google it).
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suek
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#46
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#46
(Original post by Mush)
That should not have to be an option. Students all over the country should not have to be resorting to this. Both the government AND the students were doing perfectly well in the past 20 odd years with the old system of student finance. The only problem now is SAAS' new policies. It's not on.
It's not just unique to Scotland, the English system isn't all that great either, since some people might end up with about £3500 loan and nothing more if their parents don't want to contribute.

But I agree, of course. And I'd have troubles of my own if I didn't already have savings (going to uni at 22)...
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princess_sue
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Mush)
It's illegal for you to have more than 1 student account... and I don't suggest anyone follow in your friends footsteps, if you get found out, you'll be in very serious trouble and will probably end up in more debt than you thought having 3 accounts would get you out of.
It is not illegal to have more than one. HSBC get very picky about you only having one, but banks like Natwest & RBS actually dont mind just as long as you have a small amount of money going into them.
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Mush
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#48
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#48
(Original post by suek)
In England at least, if there is a significant change of circumstances, you can appeal - this is to the person whose mum just gave birth - something like a 15% change in income for the coming year and you can appeal in England and get them to assess on the coming year.

I'd be very surprised if Scotland doesn't have a similar system.
Hmm I will look into this. But given the fact that my mum's fiancé is still earning enough to do considerable damage to my finances, I don't think my mum's change in income will affect whether or not I get less money in my pocket. My mum's fiancé does have a big bank balance, so you'd might think that he shouldn't have a problem playing up what SAAS want him to pay... but at the end of the day, his is the only income that is supporting a family of 4. A three year old who needs daycare, and a disabled child. He can not afford to have to be supporting a family of FIVE, by having to shell out several thousand pounds to me. If SAAS think they're taking money off the father of my disabled sister because THEY want to cut corners, they've another thing coming. I'll take it all the way .
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cpj1987
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#49
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OP. I might just be repeating things that others have said, but...

Your parents/guardians don't need to support you. They're adults, earning their own money, and you're an adult too. You shouldn't have to be taking money off mummy and/or daddy to get you through.
Yes, it's a shame that parental income is taken into account, but assuming you budget well and don't waste money, surviving on lower loans is entirely possible. Looking at the amount you've spent so far, it seems that your budget is ridiculous. It's your own fault if you've spent that much money in first year, and not planned ahead.
Thousands; in fact, millions of students manage to hold down a job alongside their studies, too; provided you manage your time properly that shouldn't be a problem at all. In fact, if you're spending your free time working, it'll help by stopping those chances you seem to have to spend thousands of pounds.
I apologise if this post sounds harsh, but it does annoy me that so many people expect their parents to fund them into adulthood and complain at the notion that they may actually have to budget or work for themselves.
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Mush
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#50
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#50
(Original post by suek)
It's not just unique to Scotland, the English system isn't all that great either, since some people might end up with about £3500 loan and nothing more if their parents don't want to contribute.

But I agree, of course. And I'd have troubles of my own if I didn't already have savings (going to uni at 22)...
Indeed. The new system is fair enough if you haven't started uni yet, or are just starting this year. It means you have time to budget and plan how you're going to get through your degree. But changing the policies and halving someone's finances midway through somebody's degree and expecting them to cope is ridiculous.

Especially from a political party whose priority in their pre-election manifesto was student debt. How does it help student debt if the students are having to get high interest private bank loans to cover their costs?
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suek
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#51
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#51
(Original post by cpj1987)
OP. I might just be repeating things that others have said, but...

Your parents/guardians don't need to support you. They're adults, earning their own money, and you're an adult too. You shouldn't have to be taking money off mummy and/or daddy to get you through.
Yes, it's a shame that parental income is taken into account, but assuming you budget well and don't waste money, surviving on lower loans is entirely possible. Looking at the amount you've spent so far, it seems that your budget is ridiculous. It's your own fault if you've spent that much money in first year, and not planned ahead.
Thousands; in fact, millions of students manage to hold down a job alongside their studies, too; provided you manage your time properly that shouldn't be a problem at all. In fact, if you're spending your free time working, it'll help by stopping those chances you seem to have to spend thousands of pounds.
I apologise if this post sounds harsh, but it does annoy me that so many people expect their parents to fund them into adulthood and complain at the notion that they may actually have to budget or work for themselves.
In fairness, he posted earlier about he got thrown into expensive catered accommodation in his first year, spending less than £100 on other expenses, which isn't really excessive.
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suek
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Mush)
Indeed. The new system is fair enough if you haven't started uni yet, or are just starting this year. It means you have time to budget and plan how you're going to get through your degree. But changing the policies and halving someone's finances midway through somebody's degree and expecting them to cope is ridiculous.

Especially from a political party whose priority in their pre-election manifesto was student debt. How does it help student debt if the students are having to get high interest private bank loans to cover their costs?
Exactly... I think there should be enough money around for students to *borrow* to be able to fund themselves through university; both Governments' ideas of parents paying x amount is silly, it only assumes they can.

It's a wonder what working 8 hours a week can do though, but admittedly it is can be hard getting the job in the first place.
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Mush
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#53
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#53
(Original post by cpj1987)
OP. I might just be repeating things that others have said, but...

Your parents/guardians don't need to support you. They're adults, earning their own money, and you're an adult too. You shouldn't have to be taking money off mummy and/or daddy to get you through.

From a moral stance, I agree with you, and the OP probably does too. But according to the government, the parents do need to support you between the ages of 18 and 25 if you're in full time education. That wasn't an issue for me or the OP last year, but now SAAS are trying to shove us into a corner where we have no option but to run to our parents. It's sickening. Especially since my parents can't afford it.

Yes, it's a shame that parental income is taken into account, but assuming you budget well and don't waste money, surviving on lower loans is entirely possible. Looking at the amount you've spent so far, it seems that your budget is ridiculous. It's your own fault if you've spent that much money in first year, and not planned ahead.

Have you seen the rocketing price of EVERYTHING in the past few months? Everybody is feeling the squeeze. Taking more money off students, in a year when the price of everything is inflating dramatically is going to affect all students. It's nothing to do with poor budgeting. Student accommodation is expensive, end of story. 3000 pounds would not last a year for any student.

Thousands; in fact, millions of students manage to hold down a job alongside their studies, too; provided you manage your time properly that shouldn't be a problem at all. In fact, if you're spending your free time working, it'll help by stopping those chances you seem to have to spend thousands of pounds.

Yes, that's true. But this year I finished top of my year, got straight As, and ended up on the Dean's List. I could not have achieved that had I been working simultaneously. Say what you will, but I am of the firm opinion that a job can be detrimental to academic performance. And as a uni student, academic performance should be the priority, not money.

I apologise if this post sounds harsh, but it does annoy me that so many people expect their parents to fund them into adulthood and complain at the notion that they may actually have to budget or work for themselves.

I don't expect my parents to fund them into adulthood. The government do. If I expected my parents to bail me out, I wouldn't be here complaining and neither would the OP.
Mush
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WelshBluebird
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#54
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(Original post by jismith1989)
That's symptomatic of coming from a working-class home: I do too, I'm not judging! Life can be hard, can't it?
Off topic - but no sorry, it is not symptomatic from coming from a working class home. My parents have been very supportive in me going to uni. As have the parents of most of the other people I know.
They want me to better myself.
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Mush
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#55
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(Original post by WelshBluebird)
Off topic - but no sorry, it is not symptomatic from coming from a working class home. My parents have been very supportive in me going to uni. As have the parents of most of the other people I know.
They want me to better myself.
Being shafted by the government is symptomatic of working class status though.

I never thought being a student would be privvy to the mal affects of government ruling though. We're supposed to be the people that the country rely on to build up their treasury with 40% tax of our hard-earned cash. So surely, during our students years, they should be making the financial hurdle as little as possible, to allow us to perform well academically, get into high-salary, high-profile jobs, and further the economy in the long run?
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faber niger
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#56
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(Original post by WelshBluebird)
Off topic - but no sorry, it is not symptomatic from coming from a working class home. My parents have been very supportive in me going to uni. As have the parents of most of the other people I know.
They want me to better myself.
Okay, allow me to change my proposition then (though you must accept that that the example of yourself and even your friends does not necessarily disprove my argument that working-class families tend to value university less than middle-class ones): it is symptomatic of coming from a **** home, of which I do also.
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Mush
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#57
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#57
(Original post by SmilerNuts)
How on earth did you manage to max out your overdraft if you were recieving a bigger student loan than most people last year? If you've got yourself in a financial mess, it sounds like it's your own fault.

Not to mention you were planning on spending 88% of this years loan on accommodation, that's not much for food or living costs.
Hmmm... indeed. He does seem to be having a lot of outgoings . Regardless of the OP, there are still many students who AREN'T spending willy nilly and are still feeling the squeeze. A lá me.
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Mush
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#58
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(Original post by jismith1989)
Okay, allow me to change my proposition then (though you must accept that that the example of yourself and even your friends does not necessarily disprove my argument that working-class families tend to value university less than middle-class ones): it is symptomatic of coming from a **** home, of which I do also.
Hrm not really. I wouldn't say middle class families valued it more. I think most working class families value it more. Because it's such a rarity amongst the working class to have a family member have the opportunity to better themselves and get out of the working class lifestyle. I'm the first person to go to uni from my family and they're all very supportive, and proud. They would gladly fork out the money that I'm losing from SAAS, but they can't afford it, and I don't want to put them in that position.

I think middle class families tend to take university for granted, actually. For them it's something that everyone should do, and they don't think very much of it at all... getting a degree brings you par with everyone else in the middle class. It's not as valued, I say.
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faber niger
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#59
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#59
(Original post by Mush)
Hrm not really. I wouldn't say middle class families valued it more. I think most working class families value it more. Because it's such a rarity amongst the working class to have a family member have the opportunity to better themselves and get out of the working class lifestyle. I'm the first person to go to uni from my family and they're all very supportive, and proud. They would gladly fork out the money that I'm losing from SAAS, but they can't afford it, and I don't want to put them in that position.

I think middle class families tend to take university for granted, actually. For them it's something that everyone should do, and they don't think very much of it at all... getting a degree brings you par with everyone else in the middle class. It's not as valued, I say.
Maybe that's true to a large extent. If so, then I'm sticking with my revised proposition. :p:
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Blue Rose
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I take it you weren't born in Scotland because aren't tuition fees free for scottish folk?
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