Unis that are good for medicine. Watch

ACDC
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Aciassa)
Consider whether you want to do dissection also: I know that Cardiff and Leicester do dissection.
I've heard that Leic have made their examination method more complicated. Instead of exams every semester, they've made it so that the first examination is after 6 months, the next after 12 months, the next after 18 months and so forth.
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FTC199
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#42
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#42
Newcastle will not even look at your application if you are not predicted AAA at A-level though so if you wont be then dont apply. Your GCSE's arent really good enough for edinburgh (needed 8A*'s this year i think) but send off for all the prospectuses and look through them to see what interests you
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User188463
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Wangers)
OK, lets be clear about this.

Most rankings are based on higher education funding stats.

These are based on rather arbitary things like expenditure per student, research excellence, and most notably of all - research output.

How many of these actually affect you as an undergraduate? research dosn't really affect you at all, nor does spending per student really. - The better your university is ranked (bar Oxford and Cambridge), where the tute system is sacred; all it means is that your lecturers have less and less time for you.

Another thing you fail to consider is what the university actually teaches, because you would agree with me that to compare a uni that only did medicine with a multi-faculty establishment would be grossly unfair? Imperial (science + tech and med) vs UCL, or Georges vs the rest would be prime examples. indeed, that dosn't account for those schools in which the medicine faculty is actually spread out further afield - Durham or Peninsula for instance. How can distribution of such resources be compared in a meaningful way?

All in all, you'll get a world class medical education whereever you go in the UK - Indeed Bart's claim The London as the best in the land :p: . So, get a grip and stop posting all this *******s.
No, lets be clear about this; every single piece of information is useful to someone. I have not failed to consider anything. Rankings give valuable information to people, and that is the end of the story. Why do you think the best universities end up at the top of the rankings? Or do you not believe that there are 'better' or 'worse' universities - I suppose you think you get the same education/respect/job prospects wherever you go?! Get real mate.
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Spencer Wells
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#44
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#44
(Original post by T-o dore)
I suppose you think you get the same education/respect/job prospects wherever you go?! Get real mate.
When you apply for a foundation job you don't put the name of your medical school on the form - there's no place for it. So yes, in medicine, your job prospects are the same, wherever your primary qualification is from.
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Wangers
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#45
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#45
(Original post by T-o dore)
No, lets be clear about this; every single piece of information is useful to someone. I have not failed to consider anything. Rankings give valuable information to people, and that is the end of the story. Why do you think the best universities end up at the top of the rankings? Or do you not believe that there are 'better' or 'worse' universities - I suppose you think you get the same education/respect/job prospects wherever you go?! Get real mate.
Yes I do. Why? Because your F1 job is blind to university. So it really is just down to you, what you've done and the gift of the gab.

Otherwise, tell me how your lecturers' research is going to help you? When you're first in medical school for your preclinicals, the skid marks haven't even dried yet - how the **** are you going to understand any of it? It makes sod all difference to you. The only difference it would make is how big the university is - and therefore the amount of financial help it can afford to give you.

You graduate as a doctor, end of.
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Lu-x
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#46
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#46
(Original post by ACDC)
I've heard that Leic have made their examination method more complicated. Instead of exams every semester, they've made it so that the first examination is after 6 months, the next after 12 months, the next after 18 months and so forth.
More complicated is down to personal opinion. Some people find it better, others preferred the older exams. They have increased the amount of synoptic work in the examinations, as they wanted their students to have a more all-round education and be able to link ideas between modules: just as doctors would have to do.
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River85
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Wangers)
Yes I do. Why? Because your F1 job is blind to university. So it really is just down to you, what you've done and the gift of the gab.

Otherwise, tell me how your lecturers' research is going to help you? When you're first in medical school for your preclinicals, the skid marks haven't even dried yet - how the **** are you going to understand any of it? It makes sod all difference to you. The only difference it would make is how big the university is - and therefore the amount of financial help it can afford to give you.

You graduate as a doctor, end of.
:yep: The guy speaks sense.
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AEH
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#48
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Listen up captain wazzock, why in the name of all that is good and pure do you keep trying to argue with clinical medics (Several of which, including myself, are actually involved and work in their school's admissions departments) when you yourself don't even have AS levels yet and hope to go into philosophy? Are you a troll or just stupid?
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User188463
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#49
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#49
(Original post by Wangers)
Yes I do. Why? Because your F1 job is blind to university. So it really is just down to you, what you've done and the gift of the gab.

Otherwise, tell me how your lecturers' research is going to help you? When you're first in medical school for your preclinicals, the skid marks haven't even dried yet - how the **** are you going to understand any of it? It makes sod all difference to you. The only difference it would make is how big the university is - and therefore the amount of financial help it can afford to give you.

You graduate as a doctor, end of.
So there is no category in choosing your med school? Dont you want to have a good time? Youre sounding like you should just pick a uni out of a hat. i mean, im sure you know more than me, but this peron is asking for uni's which are good for medicine - surely some are better than others?
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AEH
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#50
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#50
(Original post by T-o dore)
So there is no category in choosing your med school? Dont you want to have a good time? Youre sounding like you should just pick a uni out of a hat. i mean, im sure you know more than me, but this peron is asking for uni's which are good for medicine - surely some are better than others?
Three pages worth of no and you finally get to the end point? Do you finally realise that its quite a subtle and personal decision?
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River85
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#51
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#51
(Original post by T-o dore)
surely some are better than others?
Some are "better" than others yes, but only for an individual
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User188463
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#52
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#52
(Original post by River85)
Some are "better" than others yes, but only for an individual
Ok sure. But it seems very different to other subjects. Like, say you wanted to do English and had good grades, you would naturally want to go to the 'best' unis - oxbridge etc. I didn't realized to what extent medicine is standardized. My sister did medecine at Imperial over oxford as she said its much more 'hands-on' and less theoretical.
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River85
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#53
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(Original post by T-o dore)
Ok sure. But it seems very different to other subjects. Like, say you wanted to do English and had good grades, you would naturally want to go to the 'best' unis - oxbridge etc. I didn't realized to what extent medicine is standardized. My sister did medecine at Imperial over oxford as she said its much more 'hands-on' and less theoretical.
Durham's best for English :p:

First of all it may be different. This is because you are studying a degree that leads you straight into a profession. When universities and degrees are strictly regulated by a professional body (so all must meet the same standards) and job applications are "blind". Also unis that offer the "best teaching" was mentioned. Well, yes, this is true. But given that there are a handful of different teaching methods (PBL and traditional pre-clinical/clinical) which unis offer the best teaching is also down to personal preference.

Also, even for someone wanting to study something like English then Durham, Oxbridge, UCL, Warwick... They may not necessarily be the "best" universities for that person. Just because they are ranked highly in the league table.

I see it was mentioned earlier about research scores. You may be at a highly ranked uni with a top research score. However you have the risk here that staff may have little time for a student outside of set contact hours. This is the case at Durham's physics department I believe. I've heard of some students being virtually ignored outside of lectures and receving little additional support. The lecturers are too busy with research and postgrads.
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Wangers
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#54
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(Original post by T-o dore)
So there is no category in choosing your med school? Dont you want to have a good time? Youre sounding like you should just pick a uni out of a hat. i mean, im sure you know more than me, but this peron is asking for uni's which are good for medicine - surely some are better than others?
You pick one according to what you want and pay tables no heed. quite simply because regardless of what the Guardian says about another medical school, chances are you'll only get in by the skin of your teeth and you'll be so glad for the place that when you get there you'll have a fantastic time and a medical education that is second to none in the world.

Because quite bluntly, unless you're at a uni that regularly exports students for clinicals - you're not going to really give a **** what another medical school is like really, are you? Because you won't experience it. So why does what the Guardian wright (which is IMO ususally a load of *******s anyway) matter?
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cucumber sandwich
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#55
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****, all this university searching is making me go nuts. I just want a fresh hospital, nice ladies, nice nightlife, and a fresh university. Maybe some good football too. Recommend me a city with all of these (oxbridge + london excluded, except st. george's and queen mary).
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graemematt
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#56
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In my humblest of opinions I believe that the majority of applicants (those that know not to bother with league tables anyway) look at three key things in deciding where to go to study medicine:

1) Location of the medical school
2) Type of course
and sadly for some...(including myself at times of weakness)
3) How "easy" it is to get in

The latter point of course does play a role in prospective medical student applications, which, quite frankly, is frightening. And I'd hazard a guess that this factor plays more of a role than the position of the school in university league tables!!

As for the cucumber amigo above me, Glasgow seems to suit your every need!
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River85
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#57
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#57
(Original post by cucumber sandwich)
****, all this university searching is making me go nuts. I just want a fresh hospital, nice ladies, nice nightlife, and a fresh university. Maybe some good football too. Recommend me a city with all of these (oxbridge + london excluded, except st. george's and queen mary).
Newcastle!
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cucumber sandwich
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#58
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#58
(Original post by River85)
Newcastle!
Yes, I'm heavily leaning towards applying to their uni. I'm thinking of Bristol, Leceister, Leeds and Peninsula as well. If anyone going to those unis can comment on the social life and night life, as well as hospital quality, it would be nice.
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River85
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#59
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Newcastle speaks for itself, top party city in the country, 8th in the world!

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...cle4164023.ece

http://www.arrivastudentguide.co.uk/newcastle.html

http://www.visitnewcastlegateshead.com/

You're in a great location for some of the finest countryside and coastline in the country at Newcastle and its nightlife is legendary. However, I personally feel it's slightly overrated in that respect. If bars and clubbing is your thing then you will find no better place. Its cultural scene is good (plenty of art galleries, theatres, the Sage music centre...) it's as good as any of the cities in your list (probably as good as any outside of London) but I feel it's still overrated and not as "international class" as they seem to think. If you want a more rounded city (with less of an emphasis on clubbing) then Bristol may well meet the criteria (although I can't comment of its hospitals).

Here's Leicester's Arriva article: -

http://www.arrivastudentguide.co.uk/leicester.html

Also check out the wiki articles on TSR (all cities should be covered).

If you want to know anything more about Newcastle's social side then just PM me, I'll leave this thread to the medics now
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Gizmo!
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#60
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#60
(Original post by Spencer Wells)
When you apply for a foundation job you don't put the name of your medical school on the form - there's no place for it. So yes, in medicine, your job prospects are the same, wherever your primary qualification is from.

yeah get real yourself , the OP.
wel said Spence.
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