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Is starting a finance society a good idea? watch

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    (Original post by Jibzy)
    what else??
    One could start up a company or something rite?
    If you're going to exeter and there aren't already many finance related societies then definitely go for that, as of course you'll be the president from the start. If there's no competition from other societies I'm sure you can have a good go, there must be loads of people interested.

    Otherwise, tbh, I don't really know! I'll just take it as it comes. I'm guessing 1st year summer WE will be crucial.
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    (Original post by fblade)
    I didn't say they were picky. I've got a couple CorpFin interns/grads.

    If you've got some of the skills, it helps to blag about it
    how did you contact JPM? did you find some HR person's email adress and sent him/her; "hi, i'm bob, president of xyz soc at 123 uni, wanna come in and swing your **** about?".
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    how did you contact JPM? did you find some HR person's email adress and sent him/her; "hi, i'm bob, president of xyz soc at 123 uni, wanna come in and swing your **** about?".
    Through a PostGrad.
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    but i see where you are coming from, but then again, it won't be a society, as in a recognised society. It'll be a collection of mates with you being the glorious leader.
    No, it will be a proper society, just not registered with that university. The Royal Society is a proper society, despite not being university registered.

    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    And of course, starting a successful society will look brilliantly on one's CV, but i'm just saying that there are better things that you can spend the time and effort on. Like trying to become president of an established society that will highligh one's persuasiveness, trustworthiness and ability to build relations.
    And as I said, I entirely disagree. Starting a moderately small, moderately successful society probably involves gaining a lot more valuable skill and experience that being president of a large, successful society and keeping on doing the things it does.

    And becoming president of a truly successful society is amazingly hard. Though I have quite a high bar of what I consider a successful society, as so many just run a few events, which is fine, but not a real success IMHO.

    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    its not the skills you've learnt that counts, per se, its how well you can blag about the skills that you haven't learned, that really counts during an interview
    True, but a good interview will have a lot of substance, not just banking. Anyone can blag that they can work as part of a team if they've been involved in any society, but for top points, you need specifics - when have you resolved an issue in the team, when have you shown innocation, etc. For these, you'd need to lie, rather than blag, to do well if you haven't done some decent stuff. And if you're lying, then this whole conversation is mute, as it doesn't matter what you've actually done then.

    In terms of gaining competancies and skills, starting a society is very valuable, as is doing something impressive and new in an existing society. Hence, at least IMHO, it is worth the effort. However you'd usually only do well at this if you're motivated about the society, not just CV points.
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    (Original post by nnnnl)
    Are societies even the best way to go fo ECs? Because I'd have thought that you wouldn't be able to become president or whatever else of a good society in time for internship applications.
    It's generally possible for many. At least at Oxford, most presidents are 2nd years, so are either elected towards the end of their first year or in their second year. Even if not president, the key is doing something decent. It's perfectly possible to do something decent in a society in your first year, and definitely during the first half of your second year.
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    (Original post by Drogue)
    It's generally possible for many. At least at Oxford, most presidents are 2nd years, so are either elected towards the end of their first year or in their second year. Even if not president, the key is doing something decent. It's perfectly possible to do something decent in a society in your first year, and definitely during the first half of your second year.
    Hey Drogue. Could u please give me some tips on how to set-up and run and a society.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Drogue)
    No, it will be a proper society, just not registered with that university. The Royal Society is a proper society, despite not being university registered.
    no, it won't. it has to be registered with that university to be a society. there is difference between a bunch of mates calling themselves a society and the university calling you a society.


    (Original post by Drogue)
    And as I said, I entirely disagree. Starting a moderately small, moderately successful society probably involves gaining a lot more valuable skill and experience that being president of a large, successful society and keeping on doing the things it does..
    so do i. running a large society involves and develops not only more skills organisational, interpersonal and leadership skills, but also requires more time and commitment as you'll have to cater for a wide range of members - (i.e. booking venues, inviting guest speakers, doing activities) to maintain that society's size and popularity.

    (Original post by Drogue)
    And becoming president of a truly successful society is amazingly hard. Though I have quite a high bar of what I consider a successful society, as so many just run a few events, which is fine, but not a real success IMHO..
    so do i. which is why i encourage running for an office of an existing society, as opposed to creating a mediocre society - which it will be in its first years.


    (Original post by Drogue)
    True, but a good interview will have a lot of substance, not just banking. Anyone can blag that they can work as part of a team if they've been involved in any society, but for top points, you need specifics - when have you resolved an issue in the team, when have you shown innocation, etc.
    if you don't know/cover all this in an interview then you deserve to be credit-crunched.

    (Original post by Drogue)
    In terms of gaining competancies and skills, starting a society is very valuable, as is doing something impressive and new in an existing society. Hence, at least IMHO, it is worth the effort. However you'd usually only do well at this if you're motivated about the society, not just CV points.
    settling in yr1 + starting new soc + doing something in an existing soc + studying + getting laid + spring week(s) + enjoying uni + revising for exams + exams + 2:1 = are you being serious?

    also, IB society = CV points. why else bother?
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    also, IB society = CV points. why else bother?
    Mostly true, but I'd bet some are using it as a stepping stone to be the President of other things, it would help manage/start a business.
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    (Original post by fblade)
    Mostly true, but I'd bet some are using it as a stepping stone to be the President of other things, it would help manage/start a business.
    do you think Barack Obama was a president of his uni's IB soc?
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    do you think Barack Obama was a president of his uni's IB soc?
    Lol I meant SU Presidency and other committees etc...
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    no, it won't. it has to be registered with that university to be a society. there is difference between a bunch of mates calling themselves a society and the university calling you a society.
    :rolleyes: So the Royal Society isn't a society because it's not registered with any university? Universities don't have the sole right to grant society status.

    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    so do i. running a large society involves and develops not only more skills organisational, interpersonal and leadership skills, but also requires more time and commitment as you'll have to cater for a wide range of members - (i.e. booking venues, inviting guest speakers, doing activities) to maintain that society's size and popularity.
    So starting a society is too much effort but running a large society is better because it requires more time? Some consistency please. Running a large society well develops those, running a large society and doing the same thing it's done for the last few years doesn't require much at all and doesn't develop much.

    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    so do i. which is why i encourage running for an office of an existing society, as opposed to creating a mediocre society - which it will be in its first years.
    Only if your not good at it. I've seen people create societies with tens of thousands of pounds of sponsorship, over a thousand members and doing a huge amount of stuff within it's first couple of years. It is perfectly possible, though not at all easy, of course.

    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    settling in yr1 + starting new soc + doing something in an existing soc + studying + getting laid + spring week(s) + enjoying uni + revising for exams + exams + 2:1 = are you being serious?
    Yes, except a couple of people I know who did as such got firsts. Perfectly plausible. Hell, I did most of that, though I skipped the spring weeks, and ended up narrowly missing a first. Although the stuff I did started on the back of another society, which is a good way to launch a new society.

    You can pack a hell of a lot into uni. I reckon I averaged 30+ hours a week doing society stuff in my second year, and probably 15 or so in my first year. You look at people like BPB and others who've done far more than me and realise quite how much you can pack in.

    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    also, IB society = CV points. why else bother?
    :rolleyes: Have you not read anything I said. IB society gives you CV points, but CV points only matter as far as the interview. When you get there, it's useful to have some decent things you've actually done, not just positions you've held, to talk about. I've seen plenty of people involved in IB societies that haven't got IB offers, because they didn't actually do that much.

    In terms of getting you a job, not just CV points, starting up a society and doing some decent stuff is better than becoming president of a large society and doing the same old stuff. It's also perfectly possible to do it inside a couple of years. Just because you haven't seen it done doesn't mean it can't be, especially when others have seen it done before.
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    As someone who did run the largest and richest society at his uni... which also happened to be a finance one...

    There is limited advantage in starting 'fresh'. You'll earn a little bit of ego massage points, not much else. If you're actually the sort who wants like real success, you'll find that most uni societies are flexible enough to be what you want.
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    Perhaps if it's success you're after. In terms of skills and competancies, I think starting a new society gives you more than running an existing one. It's not about ego at all, it's about what you get out of it. Obviously this doesn't apply if you mean starting some tiny society that does jack all, but starting something and developing it.
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    OP: Can I ask what your credentials are to start a finance soc?

    My point is that I don't think you can really 'wing it' if you want your society to be high flying within one year of it's conception.
 
 
 
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