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    How does the historical context of Bowlbys theory act as a weakness??
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    (Original post by K3lvin)
    Justify your reasoning please
    Okay, so you've done a good job in explaining the capacity, duration and encoding for both STM and LTM which would give you 3 marks (according to me). You've mentioned the model is linear and touched upon sensory memory (additional two marks). The final mark I gave was for the last sentence - something a lot of people tend to miss out; how information can be lost.

    Your answer will definitely be in the high band of 5-6. But if you feel your answer is not good enough for 6 marks you can add the following:

    Information from the LTM can be muddled up or even lost by retrieval failure and interference.
    When stating the duration, capacity and encoding stuff you can briefly mention research. For example, 'Miller found capacity in STM was 7+-2, Peterson+Peterson found duration was 18 seconds and Baddeley found information was encoded acoustically (words that sound similar)'. 'For LTM, Huang found the capacity was unlimited, Barhrick et al said duration was lifelong and Baddeley found info was encoded semantically.'

    I hope I was helpful
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    (Original post by amberuniverse)
    Can someone please give me a 6/6 answer for Bowlby's Theory? I know what the main points to include are so please don't just list what they are. I have a very long answer for it and when my teacher marked it she said it was good but needs to be condensed and "less wordy" for the exam
    Hey, it's my first time posting but I thought that I may be able to help here. My teacher marked this and said it would be 6/6:

    "Outline Bowlby’s theory of attachment:

    Bowlby’s theory of attachment suggests that attachment to a primary attachment figure is innate. This is because it had long term benefits, therefore it is adaptive-increasing the infants chances of survival.
    Due to the fact that attachment is innate there is a limited time frame for its development, known as the ‘sensitive period’. Bowlby suggested that the second quarter of the first year is most sensitive.
    Not only is attachment innate, but the drive to provide caregiving is also innate. Infants are born with social releasers which elicit caregiving. Bowlby states that attachment is innate in babies and caregiving is the innate response in adults. Thisprovides a secure base; fostering independence rather than dependence. Healso suggests that the infants bias towards an individual is called Monotropy. All other attachments form a hierarchy."

    This might seem a lot but it fit into an answer box on an exam paper! Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by amberuniverse)
    Can someone please give me a 6/6 answer for Bowlby's Theory? I know what the main points to include are so please don't just list what they are. I have a very long answer for it and when my teacher marked it she said it was good but needs to be condensed and "less wordy" for the exam
    Just briefly describe the main points, that's enough for 6 marks.
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    Can anyone please tell me what pointers you would need for a 12 marker on how research into day daycare and attachment has effected child care practises? I'm really stuck! What research would you use?
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    (Original post by El0ise)
    Hey, it's my first time posting but I thought that I may be able to help here. My teacher marked this and said it would be 6/6:

    "Outline Bowlby’s theory of attachment:

    Bowlby’s theory of attachment suggests that attachment to a primary attachment figure is innate. This is because it had long term benefits, thereforeit is adaptive-increasing the infants chances of survival.
    Due to the fact that attachment is innate there is a limited time frame for its development, known as the ‘sensitive period’. Bowlby suggested that the second quarter of thefirst year is most sensitive.
    Not only is attachment innate, but the drive to provide caregiving is also innate. Infants are born with social releasers which elicit caregiving. Bowlby states that attachmentis innate in babies and caregiving is the innate response in adults. Thisprovides a secure base; fostering independence rather than dependence. Healso suggests that the infants bias towards an individual is called Monotropy. All other attachments form a hierarchy."

    This might seem a lot but it fit into an answer box on an exam paper! Hope this helps.
    Thank you
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    (Original post by amberuniverse)
    Can someone please give me a 6/6 answer for Bowlby's Theory? I know what the main points to include are so please don't just list what they are. I have a very long answer for it and when my teacher marked it she said it was good but needs to be condensed and "less wordy" for the exam
    Bowlby's theory was inspired by the ethological concept of imprinting. Imprinting is a form of attachment in which young birds learn to follow the first and large object they see during a specific time (the critical period). Bowlby suggests attachment is innate and biological, which aids survival. Key components of this evolutionary theory are that attachment is adaptive, as it increases the chance of survival - the infant will be at less risk of predation, as well as being fed and cared for.
    Social releasers refers to the things the infant does to attract attention to itself for example when infants gurgle and cry - these things guarantee a care response.
    The critical period refers to the time period from 0-3 years where the child must form an attachment bond or else it will suffer long lasting negative effects.
    Monotropy refers to the idea that an infant will form only one attachment bond to one figure, usually the PCG.
    The Internal working model suggests that the relationship the infant has with its PCG will act as a template for all future relationships.

    I've written loads, but thats because i want to make sure i get the 6/6!! I hope this was helpful
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    Guys is this a good enough answer for a 6 marker on bowlbys theory

    Bowlby suggest attachment is an innate (two way) process designed to maintain proximity. The child will engage in social releasers e.g. smiling lauging which will stimulate caregiver responses. Attachment has changed over time to ensure survival. The theory starts with monotrophy where they an attachment is formed with only one person (usually the mum). The attachment is qualitatively different to any other attachment. They is then a sensitive period will will usually last around 0-3 years. This is crucial and according to Bowlbly an attachment has to be formed at this stage. Attachment is then used for the infant as a future template for relationship so it acts as an internal working model (the continuity hypothesis). Attachement will provide the infant with cognitive develepement as it provides them with a secure base for exploration.
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    Can anyone tell me some topics that I should definitely know apart from daycare and the msm?

    I have no knowledge of anything for psychology and I'm not even very familiar with the paper (which is all my fault I know) so any help would be really appreciated!
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    (Original post by NutE)
    I'd give 6/6

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    id give it a 4/6 there's no mention of the LTM's capacity and duration....
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    (Original post by Onion Ring)
    Can anyone tell me some topics that I should definitely know apart from daycare and the msm?

    I have no knowledge of anything for psychology and I'm not even very familiar with the paper (which is all my fault I know) so any help would be really appreciated!
    Effects of daycare on aggression:
    NICHD
    Baker et al

    Effects of daycare on peer relations:
    Campbell
    Shea

    Look it up.
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    Can anyone explain to me a weakness of the working memory model for 4 marks..
    I've written...
    One weakness of the central executive is that there is little clarity for the central executive, it needs to be clearly specified rather than just controlling attention.

    but I don't think this is enough for 4 marks
    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by Onion Ring)
    Can anyone tell me some topics that I should definitely know apart from daycare and the msm?

    I have no knowledge of anything for psychology and I'm not even very familiar with the paper (which is all my fault I know) so any help would be really appreciated!
    working memory check, eye witness testimony for age, misleading information and anxiety, research methods, privation studys and insituational care, disruption of attachement, encoding capacity and duration and daycare. few more bits
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    anyone know about hodges and tizard and the NICHD study? my two weakest case studies....everything else is fairly easy as pie i think
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    (Original post by Marli-Ruth)
    Describe two strategies for improving memory.

    what would anyone put for this as i know chunking is incorrect as this is only STM?

    I would put Method of Loci and Spider Diagrams/ Mind maps?

    any other suggestions?

    acrostic/acroynym

    and method of loci simples
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    (Original post by Onion Ring)
    Can anyone tell me some topics that I should definitely know apart from daycare and the msm?

    I have no knowledge of anything for psychology and I'm not even very familiar with the paper (which is all my fault I know) so any help would be really appreciated!
    you could try doing past past papers so you get used to it and see the general topics. I think it is too late now but nothing is impossible.
    I will go thorough the specification and revise on the general and main stuff. because no one knows what is going to come up so they are no topics which you definitely have to know.
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    (Original post by yasx_)
    does anyone have a model answer for a 12 mark on day care, or points for ao1 and ao2?
    The NICHD study was a longitudinal study involving over 1000 children from diverse backgrounds. The parent and child were assessed at regular intervals to establish the effects of daycare. It was found that at the age of 5, children who had been in any sort of daycare were rated as more disobedient and aggressive. Also, children in full-time daycare (over 30 hours) were three times more likely to exhibit behaviour patterns such as arguing, lying and throwing tantrums than children who were looked after by their mothers at home.

    The EPPE study supports this. 3000 children from the UK between the ages of 3-7 from a variety of day-care settings were compared with a group of children who were looked after at home. It was found that the longer a child had spent in day-care, the more likely they were rated as aggressive by their teachers. This was especially true for children who were in day-care where many were under the age of 2. Furthermore, the quality of day-care reduced the impact of aggression.

    AO2:

    Data from the NICHD showed that it may not be day-care which led to aggression. This is because 80% of children who were in part-time daycare did not have higher levels of aggression. Therefore, other factors may be responsible. Furthermore, there is a lack of causal relationship. Research into daycare only shows a correlation between daycare and aggression, it does not show that daycare has led to aggression.

    *Those are two points: you can include a third point in AO2 for maximum marks

    10/12 I'd say
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    (Original post by K3lvin)
    Would this get me full marks?

    Bowlbys theory is an evolutionary theory where his theory sugests the attachment is important for survival. infants are innately programmed to form an attachment and this is a biological process that takes place during the critical period (0-2.5 years), the role of social releasers are emphasised and the childs relationship with the pcg provides an internal working memory model which influences later relationship and the concept of monotropy suggests that there is one attachment that is more important than the rest.
    You're on the right lines. I'd elaborate a little more on social releasers, for example. Remember to write about 20-25 words for each points (25 x 6 = 150). This is the recommended amount of words for 6 marks (you have 81).

    For example: Bowlby views that attachment is a system that has evolved to aid the survival of individuals. According to Bowlby, children have an innate drive to become attached to a caregiver and suggests that there is a specific time period which an attachment must form - this is called the critical period and Bowlby suggests that it lasts 2 ½ years. Bowlby suggests that infants are born with certain characteristics called social releasers which elicit caregiving, these include smiling/crying, etc. Furthermore, Bowlby believed that an attachment is important for protection and thus acts as a secure base, which babies can return to when threatened or in danger. Bowlby also believed that children show bias towards one individual who responds most sensitively to their social releasers - this bias is called monotropy. Lastly, Bowlby believed that an attachment creates a model for what to expect from others - this is called the internal working model which leads to the continuity hypothesis which is the view that there is a link between the early attachment relationship and later emotional behaviour. Securely attached children are more likely to be socially and emotionally competent.
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    Is it OK to feel blank before an exam?!!
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    (Original post by artymaniac)
    Can anyone explain to me a weakness of the working memory model for 4 marks..
    I've written...
    One weakness of the central executive is that there is little clarity for the central executive, it needs to be clearly specified rather than just controlling attention.

    but I don't think this is enough for 4 marks
    Thanks in advance

    You could say that it does not make clear how the episodic buffer gathers information from the components.

    Also, the model only looks at STM. It does not explain how information goes from STM to LTM.
 
 
 
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