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Do you think extra time in exams is fair? watch

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    (Original post by haprybeingright)
    Dude - I'm pretty sure he's just quoting the rules here. Autism in itself doesn't qualify for extra time, but some of the issues they mention (that autism can result in) do qualify for extra time.

    He's saying that people should be assessed on their disability not their label. I.e. case by case.
    That's already the case. It's also the case for every other disability. You don't get extra time because you have a label. You get extra time plus whatever other arrangements you need (such as modified exam papers) because your disability means you need them. I, due to my disabilities also received exam papers on coloured paper and in large print.
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    I believe extra time is fair for those that truly need it. However during my time doing GCSE's and A Levels there were one or two individuals that would get extra time when they openly admitted they exaggerated their need for it and even bragged about how easy it was to "cheat the system".
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    There are some cases where I can understand it is necessary. And then there are cases where for example in my university there was a girl who also went to my school we both study maths and both got all A*s- then suddenly maths at university begins to get hard and exams become a struggle and she's getting 2:2's and low 2:1s in first year and all of a sudden she is diagnosed with dyslexia- this merits 25% extra time in my university- I don't really understand how dyslexia has a huge effect on a subject like maths- she was clearly milking the system. If this issue went unnoticed at school it is clearly because it was a mild form of the condition which had negligable effect- very clearly not a serious case at all. In an exam system where time is such a huge constraint 25% extra time is a huge deal breaker- this turns a middle 2:2 into a first class which I find pretty obscene. Sends you from straddling the bottom 40 to straddling the top 40. Indeed she graduated from Oxford University with a 1st class in Mathematics... smh
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    There are some cases where I can understand it is necessary. And then there are cases where for example in my university there was a girl who also went to my school we both study maths and both got all A*s- then suddenly maths at university begins to get hard and exams become a struggle and she's getting 2:2's and low 2:1s in first year and all of a sudden she is diagnosed with dyslexia- this merits 25% extra time in my university- I don't really understand how dyslexia has a huge effect on a subject like maths- she was clearly milking the system. If this issue went unnoticed at school it is clearly because it was a mild form of the condition which had negligable effect- very clearly not a serious case at all. In an exam system where time is such a huge constraint 25% extra time is a huge deal breaker- this turns a middle 2:2 into a first class which I find pretty obscene. Sends you from straddling the bottom 40 to straddling the top 40. Indeed she graduated from Oxford University with a 1st class in Mathematics... smh
    This depends very much on the cognitive skill in which she is deficient. Unfortunately dyslexia has ended up an umbrella term for more than specific difficulty. Personally my biggest deficiency came in processing speed. This affects English as much as maths as it affects speed at which I can understand the question and the speed at which I can think of how I might attenpt to get from A to B or achieve what the questions asking. In fact my processing speed is so low I have difficulty maintaining a conversation with people cause I can not work with what they are saying fast enough. However, where it is granted solely for lets say reading speed or even worse very poor spelling I have to say that is then milking the system if 25% is claimed in Mathematics.
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    (Original post by OturuDansay;65907672[b)
    ]Glasses is for a physical impairment; which is completely different to dyslexic.[/b]
    Life isn't fair. If you've got dyslexia etc. that should not entitle you to extra time.
    These so called "disabilities" are just excuses for a child doing poorly at school.
    Dyslexic came about in richer communities because parents were embarrassed because their child was not as clever as the next one so therefore an excuse called "dyslexia" was made.
    Not being taught proper methods to read and write at a young age creates these "disabilities". (Other factors do come in to play as well)
    In some cases the dyslexic tendencies are likely originate in physical impairments.
    The excuse comment may be true in some cases but in my GCSE exams before my Extra time I achieved 4 A*, 5A's and a B. In fact at new my current school a disproportionate number have these problems and still results are 75% A*-B 98.9% A*-E at A level. Substainally above the national average with a UK to 10% ALPS score- meaning most people progress more than expected at A level in my college rather doing poorly.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    Lol

    Let's shut down the NHS, you've cracked it. People just need to practice away their disabilities. Stupid doctors, what do they know anyway???????
    Exactly the right response to some of the narrow-minded people on here! If someone was in a wheelchair and needed help getting in to a building thus needed a ramp, people would be in uproar if they were denied one because of 'equal rights and because everyone should be treated the same.' (Not comparing needing extra time with needing a wheelchair just the most simple response I could think of so the others could maybe begin to understand.)
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    (Original post by Chmbiogeog)
    Where should I release to? What is a wheal chair?
    Okay we have different opinions... move on.
    Stop being passive aggressive about 'The It Man's' spelling and grammar. It doesn't mean that their views are less important just because they may have difficulties in these areas, or that your views should automatically be listened to because your posts are more articulate.
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    (Original post by annieprincess)
    I understand some people who get extra time don't need it, but also it's not as simple as just acting dumb. There's a difference between processing information slowly or writing slowly to just being dumb. There may be some people who do get extra time without actually needing it, but then there's people who can claim benefits without actually needing it, or get surgery on the NHS without needing it but to rule it out completely would be setting up those who don't at disadvantage. The issue here with people not needing it is at the hands of the people carrying out assessments.

    All in all, though, extra time is completely fair. It's not like there's more people who use extra time and don't need it, than those who do.

    And you're completely wrong about everyone in agreement with extra time. Having extra time isn't ensuring that someone will pass or not. If they haven't revised enough, no matter the time they get, they won't pass. And honestly, that's silly. It's not the uneducated that get extra time, and the people who are slower SHOULD be able to get extra time so they aren't at disadvantage. Everything could be outside themselves. They could have had a lousy home environment, a mother who smoked during pregnancy, lack of healthy meals provided at home (or lack of meals at all) that cause them to be slow, putting any disorders aside. That is already putting them at disadvantage.

    The people who you deem 'slow' could go on to do great things. A girl who gets extra time because she can't write fast may get the grades to go to university and because a doctor, and save many people's lives. A boy who gets extra time may go on to university and then invent something that we need in this world. The extra time doesn't give them an advantage over everyone else, it just gives them the chance to show their capability, which most people can do in less time.

    Also, with the test being in timed conditions, IT'S STILL TIMED. It's not like they have all day to complete a test. They still have to complete it in timed conditions. A friend of mine is dyslexic and suffers with anxiety and she sometimes can't even finish her work in extra time, if she doesn't understand the question or can't remember the key scholars.

    Everyone seems so bitter about it. Worry about yourself.
    I agree with everything you've said in this post. I wish there were more people that understood on this thread. For some reason a worryingly vast amount of people on this thread think that needing extra time in exams means that they 'don't deserve' to go to uni or that they will automatically be terrible at their job. Apparently somehow there is relevance between needing extra time in exams and doing a job properly. Some are even saying that needing extra time in an exam means that they will need extra time in doing their job. Which is beyond ridiculous in most cases.
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    (Original post by georgia-hughes)
    I have ADD and severe slow processing. This means it takes me longer to write, harder to concentrate for a long period of time on one thing and basically longer to transfer knowledge from brain to paper which is a side effect of having mild cerebral palsy. This was diagnosed two months into year 13. Throughout my GCSE's and AS's, teachers were completely puzzled as to why I was getting C's, D's and E's despite having a high IQ and getting top grades in untimed questions. For example, in my ICT paper, we were given 2 hours and 15 minutes (plenty for an 80 mark paper), and the questions were fairly short, I finished on time and achieved an A, however, on my politics paper, a mark a minute, a missed out a 40 mark question because I didn't have time to finish it, yet I achieved nearly full marks in the questions I did complete resulting in low grades. Does this mean I am any less intelligent than the person who completed the paper within the time frame?

    I now have 50% extra time in my exams, this doesn't give me an advantage believe me, it puts me at the same level as the reasonably competent student and allows me to get the grades that I am capable of. I get why people don't think that extra time is fair, but how frustrated would you be if you spent months revising for exams that you were well capable of acing only to be stopped half way through.

    I find that the 'work life' argument is rather weak. Yes we are all given deadlines to some extent, but how often are employees sat down and told to reproduce a year or two's worth of revision in a tight time frame? It cost my parents £400 to 'diagnose' me which is there to try and deter students from abusing the system (although I am aware it still happens) and my mother was also diagnosed despite being in her 50's with a six figure salary so there is a prime example of how unrealistic your argument is.

    So, to entertain your point of view, maybe a career based on strict deadlines and high concentration for long periods of time isn't for me,but guess what, theres thousands of careers out there and I'll choose one that suits my working style, however education in this country does't work like that and considering I applied to russell group universities, I gathered A-Levels would be the most realistic option.

    Standardised testing has it's flaws and with my conditions, I suffer as a result of those flaws. Extra time shouldn't be awarded to those who don't need it, that is a kick in the face to me and those who work incredibly hard to finish in the snappy time frames. However, the ignorance about extra time is appalling, and maybe you ought to face the realisation that standardised testing is the problem and not extra time. Shouldn't exams be about knowledge rather than speed of completing the exam?
    Some really great points. I agree with everything you said, there has been a lot of hate and bitterness on this thread, along with ignorance and arrogance in regards to those who get extra time. You proved exactly why needing extra time in exams is fair to those who need it and that it has no relevance to how intelligent one may be.
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    (Original post by kisaki)
    Thank you. I would also agree exams, and potentially the education system itself, needs to be reformed.

    My opinion is very controversial and likely to be bashed by many, but getting good grades does not necessarily make you intelligent. I'm not saying people who do well aren't intelligent because the majority are, as well as hardworking ect. But school now seems to be what you regurgitate rather than what you can build upon or add to what we know. It also doesn't really prepare you for real life and true independent thought and creation.
    There are a lot of people who fail school who are incredibly intelligent, but simply do not test well, have differing interests or specialist areas than the curriculum or have a different learning style to the mainstream. A better education system could feed those minds and better so many more young people in various areas and have a huge global benefit.

    I think the saying 'you can't judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree' is very relevant here. There needs to be more acceptance that everyone is good at different things and has the capability to improve the world via their contributions to them. You can't say someones talents are more valid than someone elses dependant on what field they're in. There needs to be more support for varying attributes and not just english/math/science. It think it is a shame BTEC has so much stigma because they can be very valuable to certain areas such as sport that are more practical.
    What I'm getting to is that there is a difference between equality and equity; it is the latter that will benefit society but our current education system doesn't really allow for that. Extra time is a movement in that direction...

    at the end of the day extra time allows people who struggle to express themselves as quickly as others to show that that they ARE intelligent and have useful knowledge, points, opinions and arguments which deserve to be valued and recognised as much as anyone else's in society. These people can make just as valuable contributions as any of us, they just need longer to express it. In the real world, when it comes down to the most important things in life, nobody cares if it takes you an hour or a day to come up with a point, they care who makes the better point.
    Yes people abuse the system and get extra time when they don't deserve it, but that means there is a fault with the means testing, not the principle itself... Stop being bitter toward your peers and be bitter toward the system.
    I agree. It is bizarre that it is considered a controversial opinion as it seems so obvious that intelligence comes from a variety of attributes and life skills, not just grades. Unfortunately however most people judge solely on ones grades. The government really needs to change the system of exams. Exams don't measure how intelligent you are regarding a certain subject. They measure how well you can remember information/write articulate essays within a specific time limit, on a specific day and how well you can manipulate the answer to be what the exam moderate wants. They need to add variety to testing intelligence. More coursework should be one of them.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Antidepressants (and other medications) do cause some pretty unpleasant side effects, including concentration difficulties.
    Not generalizing to all people that take antidepressants, however I've known a lot of people on antidepressants and I've never met one who has unpleasant side effects. Mood stabilizers and anti psychotics are usually the ones that produce nasty side effects. Obviously they need to put every possible side effect that has have ever been claimed or has even a tiny chance of happening on the leaflet that comes in the box but generally most of these don't happen in regards to SSRI's.
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    (Original post by Mazzy95)
    Not generalizing to all people that take antidepressants, however I've known a lot of people on antidepressants and I've never met one who has unpleasant side effects. Mood stabilizers and anti psychotics are usually the ones that produce nasty side effects. Obviously they need to put every possible side effect that has have ever been claimed or has even a tiny chance of happening on the leaflet that comes in the box but generally most of these don't happen in regards to SSRI's.
    I've been on a few anti depressants and have had some pretty unpleasant side effects from both. Had to come off both (including one pretty quickly) because of the side effects. Certainly couldn't have sat exams on either.

    I find that the 'work life' argument is rather weak. Yes we are all given deadlines to some extent, but how often are employees sat down and told to reproduce a year or two's worth of revision in a tight time frame?
    And with work, your boss would take into consideration your disabilities. So, if your processing speed is slower, they'll give you less work than your colleague with no such problem.
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    Here are my thoughts:

    MENTAL DISABILITIES

    Students with dyslexia? They deserve extra time, but only for exams where their dyslexia would significantly slow down the time they'd comprehend and answer the questions. Admittedly that is most subjects, but I don't think they should get extra time for Maths.
    Students with dyscalculia? Same as above. So they should only get extra time for Maths (and maybe Physics, but that's pushing it).
    Students with ADHD? There is medicine for that. Take it. You do NOT deserve extra time.
    Students with autism? They should not be taking standardised tests. Still, if your condition is such that you genuinely need extra time, have it by all means.
    Students who are simply less intelligent? They do NOT deserve extra time.

    PHYSICAL DISABILITIES

    A kid with a crippled hand who writes very slowly? They deserve extra time.
    BUT a kid who has no disability but claims they deserve extra time because they write more slowly anyway? Learn to write faster, bub.
    On a related note, my father, who is left-handed and writes like a snail, got through school just fine with As - then went on to receive not one, but two bachelors' degrees, a masters' and a PhD all in FIVE YEARS. How? By condensing all the information needed into short and handy paragraphs. They didn't have extra time in his day.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I've been on a few anti depressants and have had some pretty unpleasant side effects from both. Had to come off both (including one pretty quickly) because of the side effects. Certainly couldn't have sat exams on either.



    And with work, your boss would take into consideration your disabilities. So, if your processing speed is slower, they'll give you less work than your colleague with no such problem.
    Fair enough. Everyone's different and some medications may more commonly give side effects than others but they all have the potential to harm those who take them in some way. Sorry to hear of any distress you have had from them. Never had any side effects from antidepressants myself (Escitalopram, Sertraline and fluoxetine at various times over the years) but my quetiapine has ruled my life with the side effects for the last 7 years.
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    (Original post by Mazzy95)
    Stop being passive aggressive about 'The It Man's' spelling and grammar. It doesn't mean that their views are less important just because they may have difficulties in these areas, or that your views should automatically be listened to because your posts are more articulate.
    No need to bring up old posts. In the real world poor grammar and spelling won't get taken seriously.
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    (Original post by Nelliebelly)
    Students with dyslexia? They deserve extra time, but only for exams where their dyslexia would significantly slow down the time they'd comprehend and answer the questions. Admittedly that is most subjects, but I don't think they should get extra time for Maths..
    hey there I can't speak for most of the groups you commented on but as far as dyslexia goes - I am dyslexic, I take academic subjects and I didn't get extra time in my GCSE's or AS's because my teachers wouldn't appy for it because I was high functioning in classes so "it wouldn't be fair on the other students", naturally I underperformed massively - and failed my AS's meaning I had to stay on for a year 14 (aka hell year). But finally they wer convinced I required extra time, so in my AS retake year I was given 25%! I actually managed to finished most of my AS exams within about 10-15% of my extra time depending on the exam and having plenty of time to check my working and answers through - probably because I've become so used to having to rush every single letter to even stand a chance of finishing the paper.

    Anyway, this year with most of my A2s I've finished comfortably within my 25% extra time and be able to spend the last few minutes checking through and correcting errors like a neurotypical student does but then some exams I've found I still don't have enough time to even finish the paper in, let along check though my workings - those papers have all been either maths exams or maths heavy exams such as physics - I don't have dyscalculia - I am perfectly fine with maths and I enjoy it but due to my dyslexia I may have failed my A2 maths exams. I can't speak on behalf of all dyslexic peeps but I find maths questions to be some of the needlessly hardest things to comprehend. Not the short 'differentiate this' or 'find x' questions, the ones where they decide to use a whole page of text to ask you to do a four mark rearrangement and substitution. And then atop that due to my shoddy handwriting, poor organisation and ridiculously low reading abilities I'm constantly misreading my own values and completing questions which I'm perfectly capable of scoring full marks on but instead am scoring half marks thanks to my disability.

    So yeah, obviously we all have different experiences but personally I'd say knowing how my dyslexia affects me - I feel like if anything I should be entitled to more extra time in maths than I get in other subjects but I can't complain because 25% extra gives me more of a chance than 0%. did.

    tl;dr - not everyone with the same disability is affected in the same way by their disability! for some people, their dyslexia might not cause them to need much extra time for maths or other subjects but this isn't the same for all dyslexic people, general statements over who needs what accommodations based on what label they have are practical in some instances, but with exam accommodations - I believe it should be individual specific as you really can't fully predict what in areas a disability will affect someone's exam performance.
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    People actually NEED extra time for various reasons like dyslexia or sensory processing disorder where they take a while to process stuff.
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    No, it's completely unfair. That's not even counting the thousands of people who are perfectly capable but get extra time!
    It's not unfair. People need the extra time for various reasons. It could be that they have ADHD and find it difficult to concentrate etc or Have issues like sensory processing disorder and take more time to process the information. Have you ever met someone who's needed extra time? For some people it can be a real lifesaver.
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    F**king h*ll people are just handed extra time it's not that easy. You have to have assessments and you're given the extra time according to how good/bad you did in that test smh


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    (Original post by richpanda)
    so..? are you going to be able to ask for more time later in life? If you were working to crack a code or hand in a project that needed to be done urgently, you can't just get extra time
    Wow rich panda you just seem to be so negative about these things. I can understand why you're against it because yes there are people that cheat the system through bribery and corruption whatever. But I truly believe that people who need extra time in exams due to mental disabilities such as dyslexia etc should get it. And as I've read somewhere here, under the equality act of 2010 if you do have a mental disability that warrants extra time you're able to get it.
 
 
 
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