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    Do we need to know the molecules needed to produce terylene/polylactic acid/nylon-6,6/kevlar?
    Also what are the reagents for producing polyamides?
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    I would love there to be like a 10 mark question on benzene reactions! Lol, I love benzene!
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    (Original post by S_Azizi)
    Do we need to know the molecules needed to produce terylene/polylactic acid/nylon-6,6/kevlar?
    Also what are the reagents for producing polyamides?
    No if they ask a question they have to give us the monomers or the structure.

    Conditions are not specified for producing polyamides I don't think
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Enlighten us with your knowledge then !
    If not spin-spin coupled, then a proton has a tiny wee pole that when put under a magnetic field will align with it. They then fire off the radiowaves, which cause the poles to 'flip' As they decay back into the ground state (aligned with the magnetic field) they emit the absorbed radiation. It is the time taken for the decay that is measured. The work I did was more aimed at the human MRI, but I know in that there are multiple gradients which can be taken to give different images.

    Something along those lines. But like has been said, we don't need to know this, and thank god, because I'm sure as hell my explanation is crappy!
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    Well Guess wot people 's in the january exam f321 they asked a question regarding something that was not on the spec so they could ask a question on NMR or maybe not there trying to make the exams more difficult i herd more application of knowlegde Questions this Year
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    (Original post by Unique..)
    Well Guess wot people 's in the january exam f321 they asked a question regarding something that was not on the spec so they could ask a question on NMR or maybe not there trying to make the exams more difficult i herd more application of knowlegde Questions this Year
    I did that paper and I know it was only a one mark suggest question :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Unique..)
    Well Guess wot people 's in the january exam f321 they asked a question regarding something that was not on the spec so they could ask a question on NMR or maybe not there trying to make the exams more difficult i herd more application of knowlegde Questions this Year
    but thats not application of knowledge, that's background/extra knowledge :P
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    Does everyone know the 3 stages of mass spec?
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    (Original post by Legendrew)
    No if they ask a question they have to give us the monomers or the structure.

    Conditions are not specified for producing polyamides I don't think
    I would challenge that with yes you do need to know the monomers, BUT I'm not sure whether that was just my teacher trying to get us learning stuff around the spec. and not to rely too heavily on what the exam board may or may not provide.

    Also, it's definitely too late, but https://sites.google.com/site/mathsl...s-and-analysis my notes are on there.
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    (Original post by S_Azizi)
    Do we need to know the molecules needed to produce terylene/polylactic acid/nylon-6,6/kevlar?
    Also what are the reagents for producing polyamides?
    Terylene: Is a polyester
    Reaction is: ethan-1,2-diol + benzen-1,4-dioic acid
    All you need to know that it eliminates water to form Terylene.

    Polylactic acid: polyester
    Reaction: made from the same monomer Lactic acid (2-hydroxypropanoic acid)

    Nylon-6,6: polyamide
    Reaction: 1,6-diaminohexane + hexa-1,4-dioic acid

    Kevlar: polyamide
    Reaction: benzen-1,4-dioic acid + benzen-1,4-diamine

    Again both polyamides take part in condensation polymerisation so water is eliminated from the monomers to produce the polymer

    Thats all you really need to know, you dont even really need to know the monomers they usually give them you
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    (Original post by Stevo F)
    Does everyone know the 3 stages of mass spec?
    No what are they
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    (Original post by Oromis263)
    I would challenge that with yes you do need to know the monomers, BUT I'm not sure whether that was just my teacher trying to get us learning stuff around the spec. and not to rely too heavily on what the exam board may or may not provide.

    Also, it's definitely too late, but https://sites.google.com/site/mathsl...s-and-analysis my notes are on there.
    I have to admit, they are very good notes
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    (Original post by Hullabaloo2803)
    Terylene: Is a polyester
    Reaction is: ethan-1,2-diol + benzen-1,4-dioic acid
    All you need to know that it eliminates water to form Terylene.

    Polylactic acid: polyester
    Reaction: made from the same monomer Lactic acid (2-hydroxypropanoic acid)

    Nylon-6,6: polyamide
    Reaction: 1,6-diaminohexane + hexa-1,4-dioic acid

    Kevlar: polyamide
    Reaction: benzen-1,4-dioic acid + benzen-1,4-diamine

    Again both polyamides take part in condensation polymerisation so water is eliminated from the monomers to produce the polymer

    Thats all you really need to know, you dont even really need to know the monomers they usually give them you
    A little thing that my teacher said that I've not been able to forget no matter how hard is terylene is a polyEster due to the high numbers of e's (and e suonds) in the name.

    Also, not for polyamides, but when defining a condensation reaction, remember (not directly at you Hullaboo! Just in general) it's a small molecule not just H20 (HCl for example)
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    (Original post by livingforthefuture)
    No what are they
    ionisation of compounds, then acceleration, then deflection of compounds, the more they are deflected the lighter they are, this allows you to work out the mass of the particles. This is then analysed by a computer which plots a graph of intensities of peaks at different deflection points which allows you to work out the compound by the masses of its ions.
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    (Original post by Oromis263)
    If not spin-spin coupled, then a proton has a tiny wee pole that when put under a magnetic field will align with it. They then fire off the radiowaves, which cause the poles to 'flip' As they decay back into the ground state (aligned with the magnetic field) they emit the absorbed radiation. It is the time taken for the decay that is measured. The work I did was more aimed at the human MRI, but I know in that there are multiple gradients which can be taken to give different images.

    Something along those lines. But like has been said, we don't need to know this, and thank god, because I'm sure as hell my explanation is crappy!
    Good stuff ..I mean MMR is basically NMR they changed the name ..so pretty much the same thing happening in there
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    PS i say 3 stages, that's what a book i read says, i just remember it as 1 whole process
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    (Original post by Stevo F)
    ionisation of compounds, then acceleration, then deflection of compounds, the more they are deflected the lighter they are, this allows you to work out the mass of the particles. This is then analysed by a computer which plots a graph of intensities of peaks at different deflection points which allows you to work out the ions of the compound.
    And all compounds have discrete fragmentation patterns which can be compared to a spectral database to identify. :F
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    (Original post by Stevo F)
    I have to admit, they are very good notes
    I am working on a set for the upcoming F325 exam, and I have my F321 and F322 ones lying about in my room somewhere, I'll scan them in at some point for people to access.
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    (Original post by Oromis263)
    And all compounds have discrete fragmentation patterns which can be compared to a spectral database to identify. :F
    u say compare to a database... why do we have to bother using mass spec graphs to identify compounds then? where's our database? horrible examiners :/
    (just proving you dont need a database to identify a compound by mass spec )
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    (Original post by Oromis263)
    A little thing that my teacher said that I've not been able to forget no matter how hard is terylene is a polyEster due to the high numbers of e's (and e suonds) in the name.

    Also, not for polyamides, but when defining a condensation reaction, remember (not directly at you Hullaboo! Just in general) it's a small molecule not just H20 (HCl for example)

    Sorry i dont understand what mistake ive made with Terylene?
 
 
 

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