Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by o.nalhady)
    So Guys!
    What do you think the group task will consist of??
    Not sure at all! What about you?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joanne9495)
    Not sure at all! What about you?
    Same! I don't know what to expect 😁


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    i think the panel is more intimidating ...:?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joanne9495)
    I am a gap year student and Scottish, so my grades are achieved but probably wont make much sense to you. They were all way over the entry grades and my UKCAT was just above average but they have NOTHING to do with the interview. I had a lot of experience and activities in my PS. The year out def helped. I volunteered in Ghana for 3 months, Malawi for 2 weeks, have a lot of hobbies and diverse work experience (which is essential to show you understand the diversity within medicine - teaching/care/research etc)!
    If you don't get an interview/place take a year out and reapply. I am so happy that I did!
    I guess it's not all about what work experience you have done, but rather how you have reflected upon it.

    Fair enough, during the summer last year, I was privileged enough to go to Malawi for 2 weeks with my college and the Sutton Trust Summer School @ Nottingham University, but all of that would mean zilch to the admissions staff if you cannot explain what you have taken from the experiences. Joanne I'm quite curious as to where you stayed in Malawi, we stayed in Blantyre and it was absolutely fantastic! I miss the country very much!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hamzah Amir Khan)
    I guess it's not all about what work experience you have done, but rather how you have reflected upon it.

    Fair enough, during the summer last year, I was privileged enough to go to Malawi for 2 weeks with my college and the Sutton Trust Summer School @ Nottingham University, but all of that would mean zilch to the admissions staff if you cannot explain what you have taken from the experiences. Joanne I'm quite curious as to where you stayed in Malawi, we stayed in Blantyre and it was absolutely fantastic! I miss the country very much!
    Totally agree with you, definitely what you learned and how you reflect on things. Someone just said something similar and I posted above. I stayed in Blantyre also, Chichiri if you have head of it. It was amazing and I love the country. It was a lot more developed however and in Ghana, I stayed in a very rural village with no toilets/showers/running water etc. I had the chance to teach health for 3 months and I learned loads for it. It was very challenging but so rewarding. My focus was on sexual reproductive health which was sometimes difficult to go around because of cultural and religious differences. I had the opportunity to stay with a host family here and they made me so welcome and I even managed to learn loads of the local language Fante from them! What did you do in Malawi? Did you ever manage to visit a Shoprite? - One of my fav shops!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joanne9495)
    Totally agree with you, definitely what you learned and how you reflect on things. Someone just said something similar and I posted above. I stayed in Blantyre also, Chichiri if you have head of it. It was amazing and I love the country. It was a lot more developed however and in Ghana, I stayed in a very rural village with no toilets/showers/running water etc. I had the chance to teach health for 3 months and I learned loads for it. It was very challenging but so rewarding. My focus was on sexual reproductive health which was sometimes difficult to go around because of cultural and religious differences. I had the opportunity to stay with a host family here and they made me so welcome and I even managed to learn loads of the local language Fante from them! What did you do in Malawi? Did you ever manage to visit a Shoprite? - One of my fav shops!
    :eek::eek::eek: You lot seem to be very knowledgeable
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by o.nalhady)
    So Guys!
    What do you think the group task will consist of??
    You're not allowed to know :nah:. It's really nothing scary! It's really straight forward.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joanne9495)
    Totally agree with you, definitely what you learned and how you reflect on things. Someone just said something similar and I posted above. I stayed in Blantyre also, Chichiri if you have head of it. It was amazing and I love the country. It was a lot more developed however and in Ghana, I stayed in a very rural village with no toilets/showers/running water etc. I had the chance to teach health for 3 months and I learned loads for it. It was very challenging but so rewarding. My focus was on sexual reproductive health which was sometimes difficult to go around because of cultural and religious differences. I had the opportunity to stay with a host family here and they made me so welcome and I even managed to learn loads of the local language Fante from them! What did you do in Malawi? Did you ever manage to visit a Shoprite? - One of my fav shops!
    Yes, I have heard of Chichiri district, it's the area of the Kamuzu Stadium and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. We stayed at the Grace Bandawe Conference Centre which was fantastic not only because the accommodation was pleasantly nice but also because the 2 schools we worked at Henry Henderson's Institute and Blantyre Girls School were literally a 5 minute walk away. Yes, of course we managed to visit the nearby Shoprite store a few times to restock on soft drink bottles and other luxuries that us Brits love like crisps and chocolates!

    I was so amazed that despite the poverty in Malawi there were still areas that reminded me of the UK for e.g. the shopping centre there, the takeaways were very tasty! Me and my cousin brought a massive burger and chips for under £2! It tasted fab!

    We basically visited Malawi to teach English to local school children at the two schools I mentioned above and also to visit two orphanages STEKA and Yamakani. Occasionally in the afternoons we go to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital to speak to Dr Neil Kennedy an Irish doctor in Malawi who showed us around the paediatric ward. I loved the fact that in Malawi they had a child-safeguarding unit, which really touched my heart. It was sad however when the doctor explained to us that vulnerable kids would often use puppets to show how they were abused

    Oh one of the other reasons we went to Malawi was because a student from our college passed away and in his memory a well was built in Mariro Village, Chiradzulu district so we went to visit the well and take pictures for his family. In the middle of the 2 weeks we went to Bushman's Baob near Liwonde to have an open roof safari trip. Some students also got to ride out a boat into the Lake Malombe. It was just such beautiful scenery! I really miss the country and would do anything to go again! I made so many friends in the schools and as the days went by they began to feel like my family members.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    You're not allowed to know :nah:. It's really nothing scary! It's really straight forward.
    LOL, you know something... I still ddon't understand how they pick the 40 people out of the 700.. most of us would have had similar stuff on the PS and if the interview is as straightforward as you constantly reassure us... how are people gonna stand out as individuals who deserve a place to study medicine??
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hamzah Amir Khan)
    Yes, I have heard of Chichiri district, it's the area of the Kamuzu Stadium and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. We stayed at the Grace Bandawe Conference Centre which was fantastic not only because the accommodation was pleasantly nice but also because the 2 schools we worked at Henry Henderson's Institute and Blantyre Girls School were literally a 5 minute walk away. Yes, of course we managed to visit the nearby Shoprite store a few times to restock on soft drink bottles and other luxuries that us Brits love like crisps and chocolates!

    I was so amazed that despite the poverty in Malawi there were still areas that reminded me of the UK for e.g. the shopping centre there, the takeaways were very tasty! Me and my cousin brought a massive burger and chips for under £2! It tasted fab!

    We basically visited Malawi to teach English to local school children at the two schools I mentioned above and also to visit two orphanages STEKA and Yamakani. Occasionally in the afternoons we go to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital to speak to Dr Neil Kennedy an Irish doctor in Malawi who showed us around the paediatric ward. I loved the fact that in Malawi they had a child-safeguarding unit, which really touched my heart. It was sad however when the doctor explained to us that vulnerable kids would often use puppets to show how they were abused

    Oh one of the other reasons we went to Malawi was because a student from our college passed away and in his memory a well was built in Mariro Village, Chiradzulu district so we went to visit the well and take pictures for his family. In the middle of the 2 weeks we went to Bushman's Baob near Liwonde to have an open roof safari trip. Some students also got to ride out a boat into the Lake Malombe. It was just such beautiful scenery! I really miss the country and would do anything to go again! I made so many friends in the schools and as the days went by they began to feel like my family members.
    Sounds amazing!!!😭


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hamzah Amir Khan)
    Yes, I have heard of Chichiri district, it's the area of the Kamuzu Stadium and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. We stayed at the Grace Bandawe Conference Centre which was fantastic not only because the accommodation was pleasantly nice but also because the 2 schools we worked at Henry Henderson's Institute and Blantyre Girls School were literally a 5 minute walk away. Yes, of course we managed to visit the nearby Shoprite store a few times to restock on soft drink bottles and other luxuries that us Brits love like crisps and chocolates!

    I was so amazed that despite the poverty in Malawi there were still areas that reminded me of the UK for e.g. the shopping centre there, the takeaways were very tasty! Me and my cousin brought a massive burger and chips for under £2! It tasted fab!

    We basically visited Malawi to teach English to local school children at the two schools I mentioned above and also to visit two orphanages STEKA and Yamakani. Occasionally in the afternoons we go to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital to speak to Dr Neil Kennedy an Irish doctor in Malawi who showed us around the paediatric ward. I loved the fact that in Malawi they had a child-safeguarding unit, which really touched my heart. It was sad however when the doctor explained to us that vulnerable kids would often use puppets to show how they were abused

    Oh one of the other reasons we went to Malawi was because a student from our college passed away and in his memory a well was built in Mariro Village, Chiradzulu district so we went to visit the well and take pictures for his family. In the middle of the 2 weeks we went to Bushman's Baob near Liwonde to have an open roof safari trip. Some students also got to ride out a boat into the Lake Malombe. It was just such beautiful scenery! I really miss the country and would do anything to go again! I made so many friends in the schools and as the days went by they began to feel like my family members.
    I also stayed at the GBC! It was fantastic accommodation but I felt from this experience I never got to experience what it would actually be like living in Malawi. We were treated as guests constantly and not a part of the local community. This was one of the reasons I decided to do more volunteering in Ghana. I was working in Chichiri Primary and Secondary developing the classrooms and school facilities. I didn't get to do much heath-related activities here, however we went to visit the local rural villages, some of the problems were astonishing. Seeing people living in such conditions with serious, untreated health problems and being so happy at the same time was amazing. There may be a few problems in our NHS but people do not understand how lucky we are to live here.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone know if Southampton offer both dissection and prosection during teaching?

    Is there an elective option in later years (maybe to carry out an intercalated degree)?

    How big is the BM5 year when the BM6's join?

    What is the general BM5 course outline by year? - I have been trying to find this online but with no luck!

    Neostignine, did you find the professional practice throughout the BM6 useful? I think it is amazing and I don't understand why more medical schools do not offer this! I think nowadays, some medical schools are teaching students to pass exams and not how to be good doctors. I think Southampton is fab for having a 'future doctor' approach rather than a 'medical student' one!
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by o.nalhady)
    LOL, you know something... I still ddon't understand how they pick the 40 people out of the 700.. most of us would have had similar stuff on the PS and if the interview is as straightforward as you constantly reassure us... how are people gonna stand out as individuals who deserve a place to study medicine??
    LOL PSs are not as similar as you may think. And an interview being straightforward doesn't mean in anyway that it doesn't allow people to shine.

    They don't pick 40 from 700. They pick 100 from 700 by grading the personal statement on the non academic entry requirements.

    They then pick 40 from 100 by seeing how well they perform at interview.



    "As you constantly reassure us" - would you rather I tell you that it's awful and people come out crying? I am just telling you guys the truth and trying to be helpful. Lots of people really enjoy their group task and having spoken to applicants while working at the interview dates I like to think I have a pretty accurate understanding of it. Most come out saying that it was actually fine and nowhere near as scary as they thought it would be. Some people come out saying that it was okay. I've never had anyone tell me it was awful.

    There is an individual interview which is obviously a good chance to show people why you deserve to be a medical student and there are aspects of the group task that allow people to show their individuality.

    While I understand that you would want to know how people stand out, until you know about how the whole interview is structured you can't really know :no:. But you're given time to prepare on the day. Part of the challenge of the task is to be able to do this I guess!













    Good luck to everyone with an interview.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joanne9495)
    Does anyone know if Southampton offer both dissection and prosection during teaching?

    Is there an elective option in later years (maybe to carry out an intercalated degree)?

    How big is the BM5 year when the BM6's join?

    What is the general BM5 course outline by year? - I have been trying to find this online but with no luck!

    Neostignine, did you find the professional practice throughout the BM6 useful? I think it is amazing and I don't understand why more medical schools do not offer this! I think nowadays, some medical schools are teaching students to pass exams and not how to be good doctors. I think Southampton is fab for having a 'future doctor' approach rather than a 'medical student' one!
    Neither prosection or dissection in BM6, but in BM5 you do prosection with the option to do dissection if you want to.

    If this disappoints anyone I am happy to find my post about why prosection is (in my opinion) way better.

    There are approximately 200 BM5 students and BM6 take the year group up to 230ish.



    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/medicin.../bm5_a100.page

    ^ Course structure is on there in written format. I'll try and find you a nicer version though.

    It was useful yes. It gives you an understanding about the job youre going into that just isnt covered in BM5. It also gives us placement experience which is useful but also keeps you motivated.

    My research project (that you will do during BM5 year 3 for your BMedSci) looks like it will be looking into professional practice and it's usefulness Something I am really interested in as I agree that it's a rare but useful thing.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joanne9495)
    Does anyone know if Southampton offer both dissection and prosection during teaching?

    Is there an elective option in later years (maybe to carry out an intercalated degree)?

    How big is the BM5 year when the BM6's join?

    What is the general BM5 course outline by year? - I have been trying to find this online but with no luck!

    Neostignine, did you find the professional practice throughout the BM6 useful? I think it is amazing and I don't understand why more medical schools do not offer this! I think nowadays, some medical schools are teaching students to pass exams and not how to be good doctors. I think Southampton is fab for having a 'future doctor' approach rather than a 'medical student' one!

    Oops missed that one.

    Elective is a different thing all together where for 10 weeks you go anywhere in the world and practice any sort of medicine you like. This will happen in your final year.

    With regard to intercalating - you do a research project in BM5 year 3 (BM6 year 4) where you will be awarded a BMedSci. When you graduate you therefore automatically get BMBS BMedSci. You can take a year out and do the last year of a BSc either at Southampton or elsewhere (so you get BMBS BmedSci BSc) or you can do an extra year to take your BMedSci to a masters (BMBS MMedSci).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    Oops missed that one.

    Elective is a different thing all together where for 10 weeks you go anywhere in the world and practice any sort of medicine you like. This will happen in your final year.

    With regard to intercalating - you do a research project in BM5 year 3 (BM6 year 4) where you will be awarded a BMedSci. When you graduate you therefore automatically get BMBS BMedSci. You can take a year out and do the last year of a BSc either at Southampton or elsewhere (so you get BMBS BmedSci BSc) or you can do an extra year to take your BMedSci to a masters (BMBS MMedSci).
    THANK YOU!

    You need to be hired by admissions, you are brilliant!
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joanne9495)
    THANK YOU!

    You need to be hired by admissions, you are brilliant!
    It's no trouble. When I applied there was no one giving out any information so I am just trying to be helpful and fill in the gaps. Med school applications are stressful enough.

    You're asking really good questions though :yes:. Keeps this more interesting for me and shows you're doing your research! Good luck x
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Just out of interest what were the ukcat scores by those who received interview invites.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by johnabdul)
    Just out of interest what were the ukcat scores by those who received interview invites.
    635 - band 1
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by johnabdul)
    Just out of interest what were the ukcat scores by those who received interview invites.
    It's not used for BM6 :nah:.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.