OCR Physics A G484 - The Newtonian World - 11th June 2015 Watch

[email protected]
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#601
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#601
(Original post by buxtonarmy)
On SHC so you might want to see answer
Can anyone explain June 2012 4b to me,
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Leechayy
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#602
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#602
(Original post by [email protected])
So hhow do you do it :P
Right let's see if I remember this:
Mass= 600kg
Angle=40 degrees
Radius=50m
1. Resolve horizontal and vertical forces
Rcos40=600g
600gsin40 =centripetal force

600gsin40 =mv^2/r
And from there it should be EZPZ

Actually, you're right it does seem more like a Mechanics question

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randlemcmurphy
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#603
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#603
(Original post by Leechayy)
Right let's see if I remember this:
Mass= 600kg
Angle=40 degrees
Radius=50m
1. Resolve horizontal and vertical forces
Rcos40=600g
600gsin40 =centripetal force

600gsin40 =mv^2/r
And from there it should be EZPZ

Actually, you're right it does seem more like a Mechanics question

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Would the centripetal force not be 600gtan(40)? As the component which is the centripetal force is Rsin(40) and we know that R=600g/cos(40)
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Leechayy
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#604
(Original post by randlemcmurphy)
20.3 ms-1 to 3.S.F.?
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Leechayy
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(Original post by randlemcmurphy)
Would the centripetal force not be 600gtan(40)? As the component which is the centripetal force is Rsin(40) and we know that R=600g/cos(40)
That might be it actually

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Zargabaath
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#606
(Original post by buxtonarmy)
Can someone explain specific heat capacity to me? Like what would a high specific capacity mean? Thanks
Specific Heat Capacity is the energy needed to increase the temperature of a substance. Water has a high SHC so needs a relatively high amount of energy to increase it's temperature. Oil has a low SHC so needs less energy to increase its temperature by the same amount.

It's quite a weird concept to get your head around, but basically some things heat up quicker than others.
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[email protected]
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#607
Simple harmonic motion is Kinetic energy and potential energy,

What form(s) does the potential energy take?
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randlemcmurphy
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#608
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#608
(Original post by [email protected])
Simple harmonic motion is Kinetic energy and potential energy,

What form(s) does the potential energy take?
If it is a mass-spring system, along with G.P.E. you would also consider the elastic potential energy of the spring.
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Leechayy
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#609
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(Original post by randlemcmurphy)
Would the centripetal force not be 600gtan(40)? As the component which is the centripetal force is Rsin(40) and we know that R=600g/cos(40)
Yeah, went through it again, it is 600gtan(40)
Thankss:smug:

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shorty.loves.angels
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#610
Quizlet.com for a website with 'packs' of flashcards. Also similar but different revision methods for definitions/ descriptions; 'scatter' is good, 'space race' for picking your speed up. Useful for not wasting too much time on one answer qs
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Leechayy
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#611
(Original post by randlemcmurphy)
20.3 ms-1 to 3.S.F.?
Did it again + got 22.1ms[sup]-1[sup] to 3sf.
How are you doing it?

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that________guy
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#612
(Original post by [email protected])
Can anyone explain June 2012 4b to me,
(i) A-B: Increase temp. therefore increase in Kinetic energy of particles, with little/no change in potential energies as seperation between molecules is unchanged

B-C: Opposite pretty much.... so increase in PE, and NO change in KE

(ii) As you can see in the two positive grad. lines the second one has a smaller grad. compared to the first one.... therefore cos E=mc(delta T) & so C=E/m(DELTA T)
hence for the first one (cos the gradient is greater) the c will be smaller as they are inversely proportional
so.. specific heat capacity in liquid state is GREATER than c in solid state.
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randlemcmurphy
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(Original post by Leechayy)
Did it again + got 22.1ms[sup]-1[sup] to 3sf.
How are you doing it?

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I got 600v2=600gtan(40)*50
So then v2=50gtan(40)
Leading to v=(50gtan(40))1/2

Finally v=(411.578....)1/2= 20.3 ms-1 (3.S.F.)
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Leechayy
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(Original post by randlemcmurphy)
I got 600v2=600gtan(40)*50
So then v2=50gtan(40)
Leading to v=(50gtan(40))1/2

Finally v=(411.578....)1/2= 20.3 ms-1 (3.S.F.)
I'm so stupid, I forgot the tan(40)
Yeah. You're right

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BrokenS0ulz
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#615
(Original post by randlemcmurphy)
I got 600v2=600gtan(40)*50
So then v2=50gtan(40)
Leading to v=(50gtan(40))1/2

Finally v=(411.578....)1/2= 20.3 ms-1 (3.S.F.)
I don't get why it's tan. I've done a diagram.
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Leechayy
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(Original post by BrokenS0ulz)
I don't get why it's tan. I've done a diagram.
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I thought so at first but the only thing is that R is put in terms of mg.
Rcos 40 = mg ---> R= mg/cos40

Sub that into Rsin40 and you get mgsin40/cos40 ---> mgtan40
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BrokenS0ulz
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(Original post by Leechayy)
I thought so at first but the only thing is that R is put in terms of mg.
Rcos 40 = mg ---> R= mg/cos40

Sub that into Rsin40 and you get mgsin40/cos40 ---> mgtan40
Ok I get it now. But don't you think this is beyond the spec? I didn't know that sin/cos = tan, and it's not on the formula sheet.
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Leechayy
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(Original post by BrokenS0ulz)
Ok I get it now. But don't you think this is beyond the spec? I didn't know that sin/cos = tan, and it's not on the formula sheet.
It was an extension question to be honest.
I don't know, does OCR assume everyone taking A2 Physics has taken AS Maths?
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Makashima
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why do we measure in kelvin, whats your standard answer guys?
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ETRC
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(Original post by Leechayy)
It was an extension question to be honest.
I don't know, does OCR assume everyone taking A2 Physics has taken AS Maths?
they are not allowed to. they have to assume no students take maths a level hence there is no calculus involved.
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