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Edexcel FP3 - 27th June, 2016 watch

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    (Original post by ホク水ね)
    Is reflections in planes and lines in vectors on the syllabus? I've seen questions of it in June 2014 IAL etc. but it's not specifically in the spec or in the textbook?
    Yes it is. It's in the review exercises. It's from C4, I believe.
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    (Original post by Ayman!)
    Yes it is. It's in the review exercises. It's from C4, I believe.
    do you think there will be vector proofs. like convert the equation of r.n=p, into cartesian equation form by replacing r by xi+yj+zk and n by n1i+n2j+n3k
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    what would In = the integral of sin(nx)/sinx be
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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    I chose to go all out on S2 tbf, it's an easy 100%
    Is that for everyone?
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    Can someone please explain how to do this?

    This is from June 2013.

    I understand how to get the B value. But not the rest?? It always messes me up!
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    (Original post by Inges)
    Can someone please explain how to do this?

    This is from June 2013.

    I understand how to get the B value. But not the rest?? It always messes me up!
    The line that the planes intersect at is parallel to the perpendicular to both planes, hence why we take the cross product of both directions of the planes.

    We then let either x, y or z equal zero (as the lines are infinite, there will be a point when either of these three values equal zero.

    We then set up a system of simultaneous equations, substituting either X=0, y=0, or z=0 into both equations of the planes (might need to convert to Cartesian to see this).

    Once done, you have a point on the plane (from the above) and the direction of the line.

    You can then shove it in your equation of a line
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    (Original post by Inges)
    Can someone please explain how to do this?

    This is from June 2013.

    I understand how to get the B value. But not the rest?? It always messes me up!
    i explained this question to someone on this thread try going to the other pages to look for my comment but in return could you help me with a question?
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    could someone please help me with this question. found it when looking through fp3 spec.
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    (Original post by Major-fury)
    i explained this question to someone on this thread try going to the other pages to look for my comment but in return could you help me with a question?
    I've just thumbed up your question dude cause I have no idea how those two reduction formula work first time seeing them!

    I have a feeling its where you set you U and dV/dX the other way around to get an increasing reduction formula? Does that ring any bells?
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    (Original post by Inges)
    I've just thumbed up your question dude cause I have no idea how those two reduction formula work first time seeing them!
    i just figured it out got someone to explain it to me lmao
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    (Original post by Inges)
    I've just thumbed up your question dude cause I have no idea how those two reduction formula work first time seeing them!

    I have a feeling its where you set you U and dV/dX the other way around to get an increasing reduction formula? Does that ring any bells?
    you let sin(nx)=sin((n+2)x-2x) and then the rest is trig
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    (Original post by Major-fury)
    could someone please help me with this question. found it when looking through fp3 spec.
    Consider using In - In-2, and combining the two to form the integral of one fraction.

    You integrate once at the very end, and it is just a basic integral (no parts or anything like that).
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    Whats the area of a parralelpiped?
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    (Original post by Major-fury)
    i just figured it out got someone to explain it to me lmao
    I've just found your explanation as well and figured my problem out!

    Easy peasy. Thanks dude
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    (Original post by Hineshtailor)
    Whats the area of a parralelpiped?
    |a.(b x c) |
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    (Original post by Inges)
    I've just found your explanation as well and figured my problem out!

    Easy peasy. Thanks dude
    no problem man
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    Name:  IMG_0037.jpg
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    Thoughts on this one? No idea where to start! I was thinking using the sin A - sin B formula that we never use in C3.
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    (Original post by oinkk)
    Name:  IMG_0037.jpg
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    Thoughts on this one? No idea where to start! I was thinking using the sin A - sin B formula that we never use in C3.
    Where did you find this???
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    (Original post by Major-fury)
    no problem man
    Hey dyou think you could write out on a piece of paper how you'd do the sin nx integral and upload it?

    I just tried it using the manipulation you said but I cant hack it??
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    (Original post by Inges)
    Where did you find this???
    It's in a book called "Further Pure Mathematics" and was written around the time of the Stone Age.

    This actual question is from 1976.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/085...7JL&ref=plSrch
 
 
 
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