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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I need advice on this though. What do I do?

    I have a class on year 8s who aren't naughty, but there is CONSTANT background chatter and I can't get them to shut up. The problem is there are too many who are doing this to use my usual methods. My mentor told me that writing names on the board and pinpointing them won't work because it is about 80% of the class who are talking. I can't keep them all in either because that punishes the 20%. Whenever I get them quiet it literally is noisy again after seconds. Nothing I say or do will get them to be quiet. What do I do?

    I saw my mentor teach them for one lesson today and they were fine for her yet she does nothing different. I am convinced I just don't have chemistry with this class and that the lack of relationship means I'm never going to be able to control them. Is this true?

    I've tried everything my mentor has said but it is hard to do on a class wide basis. She tells me to state the obvious - "you're talking over me", but I can't say that to the whole class because it means nothing. It is good for just one but not all. Then things like moving around the class when trying to get them quiet because they need a physical presence - made no difference. Competition with points on desks today - made no difference.
    It really is difficult to get a handle on them when they're not really 'yours' and they know it. There will always be classes you just don't click with, and you will spend all your time hating them just as much as they hate you.

    With low level background chatter with one of my classes. I took about 30 minutes of a lesson once and lectured them on their poor manners and lack of respect. They don't like being told they are 'bad people'. I explained the implications of their noise and the impact this has on other people and that their downright selfishness is not appropriate for the classroom. Rather than being angry with them, a hurt/ disappointed approach worked better for me. I then implemented an "I will warn the entire class 3 times about noise levels, on the third warning you work in silence" plan.

    Or you do a 10 min plenary in which they right down the classroom rules they think should be implemented. They hand this in, you sift through and come up with 5 basic rules from what they have written. You start afresh next lesson and punish them by their own rules.

    Other than that, put a stopwatch on the board and press start every time they start talking and inform them that that is time they owe you.

    Or pit them against each other for a reward of leaving the classroom first (works well before lunch or end of day). I do girls vs boys. Naming names and liberally adding points to the other side gets mine pretty angry with each other.

    Or a simple, "the next person to interrupt me comes back at lunchtime".

    Or you put them in silence for an entire lesson and give them nothing but boring crap to do and tell them you won't be teaching them properly until you think you can trust them enough. That their behaviour has FORCED you to do this to them. Anybody speaks and the sanction is applied immediately. (Mentor might not like this idea lol) This one really worked for the class I mentioned above, with permission from my hod. Now I need only say "oh, perhaps we need some silence for the next task?" and they shut up quick.

    Or you kill them with kindness. You thank those who are doing as you have asked. You shower them with praise and ignore the rest. You have the list of activities for the lesson on the board as they enter with some nice "work with a person of your choice" for a 10 min task or a wandering around scavenger hunt and take away their privilege of doing this if they can't be respectful enough to listen to your instructions. Some of mine respond well to being given that bit of extra freedom, (even though I'm hesitant to give it to them because they're too noisy) and they then respond well to the next task.

    And a final thing I'm guilty of (having lots of year 9 in the final period of the day) is giving them a good 5 minutes to get in and get their stuff out and say everything that needs to be said before I ask for quiet. Don't try and get them to be quiet before they're all sat down with their stuff out.


    Depends on your kids and school overall, really. I don't think I work in a particularly 'good' nor 'bad' school, but they certainly understand the value of respect and don't want to be told that they are disrespectful. It has taken me months and months to be satisfied with the relationship I have with some of my classes. Don't be too hard on yourself if you don't get there with them.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I need advice on this though. What do I do?I have a class on year 8s who aren't naughty, but there is CONSTANT background chatter and I can't get them to shut up. The problem is there are too many who are doing this to use my usual methods. My mentor told me that writing names on the board and pinpointing them won't work because it is about 80% of the class who are talking. I can't keep them all in either because that punishes the 20%. Whenever I get them quiet it literally is noisy again after seconds. Nothing I say or do will get them to be quiet. What do I do?I saw my mentor teach them for one lesson today and they were fine for her yet she does nothing different. I am convinced I just don't have chemistry with this class and that the lack of relationship means I'm never going to be able to control them. Is this true?I've tried everything my mentor has said but it is hard to do on a class wide basis. She tells me to state the obvious - "you're talking over me", but I can't say that to the whole class because it means nothing. It is good for just one but not all. Then things like moving around the class when trying to get them quiet because they need a physical presence - made no difference. Competition with points on desks today - made no difference.
    I really can relate to this. I have a similar dilemma. They're year 8s and they just don't respect me. With their usual teacher they are a nice group, but as soon as I am left alone they just don't shut up. I can't get anything done and I always struggle to plan because I feel I can't control them enough to do the things I want with them. It sounds awful to say 'we hate each other' but that is how it really feels to me. When I leave I will be glad not to see them ever again. I'm less intimidated by my year 10s than this class.
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    (Original post by Grant2007)
    It is difficult but it really is about building an ethos of mutual respect which is really hard for a student teacher to achieve, especially if it has gone on for a wee while. Rewarding good behaviour does work but it can take time to establish. Is your mentor in when you teach to observe and give feedback as that would be most useful really?

    Are you really clear and pointed with your learning intentions and success criteria so they know exactly what they are learning and if they are succeeding as that is really useful too as it can motivate them? Make sure it is something achievable within the one lesson are are active and interesting. For example I wanted a class to hold a debate so I mocked up a newspaper article saying that they were going to use wave power on the coast at the beach and the beach would be closed all summer. They were livid and really motivated. I did tell them before at the end of the lesson , after pointing out how they had been really successful, that I had made it up!

    Hope this helps...


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    Thanks for this. Yes she observes and gives useful advice but I think she just doesn't realise that if I copy her tactics they aren't necessarily going to work because the kids know I'm new.

    I do know what you mean by learning objectives. They are bottom set, and they are often clueless and it can be hard to tell them what we are doing and explain it when they won't even listen. I think they lack confidence so get distracted easily because they don't believe they can do the work. Perhaps a lesson aimed at building confidence would work well first.

    And yes, topical lessons that get them motivated are useful. They are an opinionated bunch. Sadly the current unit doesn't lend itself well to that...

    (Original post by rachel.h)
    It really is difficult to get a handle on them when they're not really 'yours' and they know it. There will always be classes you just don't click with, and you will spend all your time hating them just as much as they hate you.

    With low level background chatter with one of my classes. I took about 30 minutes of a lesson once and lectured them on their poor manners and lack of respect. They don't like being told they are 'bad people'. I explained the implications of their noise and the impact this has on other people and that their downright selfishness is not appropriate for the classroom. Rather than being angry with them, a hurt/ disappointed approach worked better for me. I then implemented an "I will warn the entire class 3 times about noise levels, on the third warning you work in silence" plan.

    Or you do a 10 min plenary in which they right down the classroom rules they think should be implemented. They hand this in, you sift through and come up with 5 basic rules from what they have written. You start afresh next lesson and punish them by their own rules.

    Other than that, put a stopwatch on the board and press start every time they start talking and inform them that that is time they owe you.

    Or pit them against each other for a reward of leaving the classroom first (works well before lunch or end of day). I do girls vs boys. Naming names and liberally adding points to the other side gets mine pretty angry with each other.

    Or a simple, "the next person to interrupt me comes back at lunchtime".

    Or you put them in silence for an entire lesson and give them nothing but boring crap to do and tell them you won't be teaching them properly until you think you can trust them enough. That their behaviour has FORCED you to do this to them. Anybody speaks and the sanction is applied immediately. (Mentor might not like this idea lol) This one really worked for the class I mentioned above, with permission from my hod. Now I need only say "oh, perhaps we need some silence for the next task?" and they shut up quick.

    Or you kill them with kindness. You thank those who are doing as you have asked. You shower them with praise and ignore the rest. You have the list of activities for the lesson on the board as they enter with some nice "work with a person of your choice" for a 10 min task or a wandering around scavenger hunt and take away their privilege of doing this if they can't be respectful enough to listen to your instructions. Some of mine respond well to being given that bit of extra freedom, (even though I'm hesitant to give it to them because they're too noisy) and they then respond well to the next task.

    And a final thing I'm guilty of (having lots of year 9 in the final period of the day) is giving them a good 5 minutes to get in and get their stuff out and say everything that needs to be said before I ask for quiet. Don't try and get them to be quiet before they're all sat down with their stuff out.


    Depends on your kids and school overall, really. I don't think I work in a particularly 'good' nor 'bad' school, but they certainly understand the value of respect and don't want to be told that they are disrespectful. It has taken me months and months to be satisfied with the relationship I have with some of my classes. Don't be too hard on yourself if you don't get there with them.
    Wow thanks for all this advice. Much appreciated!

    With the lecture you gave your class, I did that to them earlier in the week and got told it was a bad move because they don't care if they are rude or disrespectful. My mentor wrote on my notes 'so what?', which is quite accurate for this class because they couldn't care less. They know they are disrespectful and rude and pointing it out sadly makes no difference. I wish I had kids who did care about that!

    I love the stopwatch thing, I've used it in the past and forgot about it to be honest. The absolute pain is that I mostly have them at the end of the day and I'm not allowed to keep them back at all because of buses . I think telling them to come back at break the next day won't work. Most won't turn up and then I'll have to push it further for something that didn't need to go that far, if that makes sense. So that is really irritating. I do have a couple of lunch time lessons I can make use of that with though.

    Competitions are something I need to put some thought into more. The class is 80% boys and obviously they love a bit of competition. It is finding something effective because I have tried a couple and it hasn't influenced them as much as I'd like. I give sweets out at the end for the table that got the most points and they get really annoyed then that they didn't get sweets, but they still don't try harder to actually get them!

    Thanks for all your pointers though. I am definitely going to try and adapt some for my class. I need to start thinking creatively.

    (Original post by bonniex123)
    I really can relate to this. I have a similar dilemma. They're year 8s and they just don't respect me. With their usual teacher they are a nice group, but as soon as I am left alone they just don't shut up. I can't get anything done and I always struggle to plan because I feel I can't control them enough to do the things I want with them. It sounds awful to say 'we hate each other' but that is how it really feels to me. When I leave I will be glad not to see them ever again. I'm less intimidated by my year 10s than this class.
    Again, it is nice to know I am not alone. I feel the same about my year 10s. They are hard work but I feel like I can talk to them like adults more. These year 8s are just stupid and it's like talking to a brick wall.

    Am I right in saying you're a trainee too? Has your mentor commented on your year 8 class?
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Wow thanks for all this advice. Much appreciated!

    With the lecture you gave your class, I did that to them earlier in the week and got told it was a bad move because they don't care if they are rude or disrespectful. My mentor wrote on my notes 'so what?', which is quite accurate for this class because they couldn't care less. They know they are disrespectful and rude and pointing it out sadly makes no difference. I wish I had kids who did care about that!

    I love the stopwatch thing, I've used it in the past and forgot about it to be honest. The absolute pain is that I mostly have them at the end of the day and I'm not allowed to keep them back at all because of buses . I think telling them to come back at break the next day won't work. Most won't turn up and then I'll have to push it further for something that didn't need to go that far, if that makes sense. So that is really irritating. I do have a couple of lunch time lessons I can make use of that with though.

    Competitions are something I need to put some thought into more. The class is 80% boys and obviously they love a bit of competition. It is finding something effective because I have tried a couple and it hasn't influenced them as much as I'd like. I give sweets out at the end for the table that got the most points and they get really annoyed then that they didn't get sweets, but they still don't try harder to actually get them!

    Thanks for all your pointers though. I am definitely going to try and adapt some for my class. I need to start thinking creatively.
    You're welcome The only true advice one can give on behaviour management is that you just gotta keep ploughing on. As for the competition, getting the ringleaders involved first is the key to cracking them. Get them into it and the sheepy ones should follow. And if you have them at the end of the day like I do, maybe the winners can leave first. Then the second team/ third etc. The losers have to put all the chairs up, or collect dictionaries in or something.

    Literally any time you have them just before lunch, you have them over a barrel. Put their name on the board and then just keep adding minutes. The minutes go too many for lunchtime detention, fine.... they've earned an after school.

    Like I say, I'm still going... Teenagers are like unexploded bombs. You never know what they'll do next.
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    (Original post by rachel.h)
    You're welcome The only true advice one can give on behaviour management is that you just gotta keep ploughing on. As for the competition, getting the ringleaders involved first is the key to cracking them. Get them into it and the sheepy ones should follow. And if you have them at the end of the day like I do, maybe the winners can leave first. Then the second team/ third etc. The losers have to put all the chairs up, or collect dictionaries in or something.

    Literally any time you have them just before lunch, you have them over a barrel. Put their name on the board and then just keep adding minutes. The minutes go too many for lunchtime detention, fine.... they've earned an after school.

    Like I say, I'm still going... Teenagers are like unexploded bombs. You never know what they'll do next.
    Yeah, I know what you mean. What is really annoying with this class is that they are on a carousel, so I have them for three weeks and then get a new class and never see them again. So it sometimes feels that as soon as I start to get a grip on them I lose them and get a new class!

    One thing I forgot to mention actually is that my mentor has told me that I need to pick one pupil, take them outside and completely let loose on them, just loud enough so the class can hear so it establishes my authority. But I've been totally honest with her and told her I don't think I can do that. I am just not comfortable with one to one screaming with kids. Not yet anyway. And if that makes the difference between a grade 1 or 2 for me then so be it.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Yeah, I know what you mean. What is really annoying with this class is that they are on a carousel, so I have them for three weeks and then get a new class and never see them again. So it sometimes feels that as soon as I start to get a grip on them I lose them and get a new class!

    One thing I forgot to mention actually is that my mentor has told me that I need to pick one pupil, take them outside and completely let loose on them, just loud enough so the class can hear so it establishes my authority. But I've been totally honest with her and told her I don't think I can do that. I am just not comfortable with one to one screaming with kids. Not yet anyway. And if that makes the difference between a grade 1 or 2 for me then so be it.
    Yup, making an example of one of them works too. I'd do it in the classroom, but that's me. And I'd have to be sure it was a kid who wouldn't want to show off and walk out. Plus, you can absolutely blast some kids and they'll just stare back blankly because it's what they're used to. That sounds vile, but it is an unfortunate reality.

    Your call. Make sure every lesson starts afresh and you aren't expecting (even though you are) any background chatter. You could also get involved in the conversation as they get their stuff out , so their attention is on you as you end the conversation and start the lesson. I have some year 8 lads I've gotten on side that way.


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    Maybe ask to try a stand alone lesson to grab their interest...? A building confidence lesson might work too. Don't give up, you are nearly there... Once you have your own classes it is totally different.


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    I had a bad group at to establish my authority i said i was fed up with the behaviour of this class so they were now on a short leash. They had 2 warnings and then they would get a half hour after school detention. Their name went up on the board for the first warning, got a tick for the second and a line through it when they got the detention. I made a show of waving the printed out sheets at them to show i was prepared to write them up there and then.
    the first lesson there were 3 detentions and 2 close calls, 2nd lesson 1 detention and 2 close calls...now, they enter in total silence and i usually just have to issue a single warning to the worst characters. They had a relapse the other week with 2 detentions and one of those continued to push me so i just relocated them to the head of department, they quickly remembered to behave.
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    I am so utterly embarrassed

    Been feeling a bit ill the last few days with a sore throat and stuff. This morning I woke up about 5 with no voice and feeling horrendous, debated calling in sick but decided against it. On my walk in I felt awful and started getting the sweats and was going to ask my mentor if I could leave when I'd taught my lessons for the day.

    Got into the staffroom and got asked if I was okay and I just burst into tears, said I was feeling awful and my mentor and another teacher sat with me in the medical room for a bit. My mentor didn't even entertain the idea of me teaching today and he sent me home. Threw up at school so I know I needed to not be there...

    I feel so so embarrassed and eurgh, I just feel like such a wimp especially as a fair few teachers saw me cry.

    I also feel bad because it meant my mentor had to take my classes and I don't feel like I gave him enough warning
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    (Original post by Samus2)
    I am so utterly embarrassed

    Been feeling a bit ill the last few days with a sore throat and stuff. This morning I woke up about 5 with no voice and feeling horrendous, debated calling in sick but decided against it. On my walk in I felt awful and started getting the sweats and was going to ask my mentor if I could leave when I'd taught my lessons for the day.

    Got into the staffroom and got asked if I was okay and I just burst into tears, said I was feeling awful and my mentor and another teacher sat with me in the medical room for a bit. My mentor didn't even entertain the idea of me teaching today and he sent me home. Threw up at school so I know I needed to not be there...

    I feel so so embarrassed and eurgh, I just feel like such a wimp especially as a fair few teachers saw me cry.

    I also feel bad because it meant my mentor had to take my classes and I don't feel like I gave him enough warning
    Tears on a PGCE is like a rite of passage. Some unis don't let you graduate until other teachers have seen you in full-on sobbing mode Don't worry about it, dude. They've all been there, I've been there and so has everyone else on here.

    Plus we've all had to wing lessons. Bet he had a nice poster-making one with your classes!

    GO TO BED.
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    (Original post by Samus2)
    I am so utterly embarrassed

    Been feeling a bit ill the last few days with a sore throat and stuff. This morning I woke up about 5 with no voice and feeling horrendous, debated calling in sick but decided against it. On my walk in I felt awful and started getting the sweats and was going to ask my mentor if I could leave when I'd taught my lessons for the day.

    Got into the staffroom and got asked if I was okay and I just burst into tears, said I was feeling awful and my mentor and another teacher sat with me in the medical room for a bit. My mentor didn't even entertain the idea of me teaching today and he sent me home. Threw up at school so I know I needed to not be there...

    I feel so so embarrassed and eurgh, I just feel like such a wimp especially as a fair few teachers saw me cry.

    I also feel bad because it meant my mentor had to take my classes and I don't feel like I gave him enough warning
    Don't feel embarrassed or guilty at all!

    Every teacher has been there so they all know how you feel and won't think badly of you for crying.

    I have gone in and had to go home three times. Twice I convinced myself I was fine, struggled through teaching (god knows how I taught skipping to three year olds!) And then as soon as I could leave suddenly felt abysmal and threw up. The other I had been doing overtime (in a nursery) for a couple of months, so 50 hour weeks with the children, and it stopped me getting over a cold which just got worse. I got through the morning then lay down and cried at lunch, they sent me home and I cried again at the doctors lol.

    I also cried three times on my PGCE... In the toilets, at home (WHAT IF I'M JUST A TERRIBLE TEACHER?!?!) and once in a meeting with a mentor after an abysmal lesson. But only once in my NQT year, and that was because another staff member told a member of SLT I'd spoken nastily to them, which really upset me because I would never want to upset or speak nastily to anyone, I pride myself on being nice and really liked this staff member, plus it was right before an observation. The SLT member was lovely though, she shut the door and just listened and let me wait, offered to rearrange the observation and said she understood.

    So it happens!

    Hope you're recovering well.

    Xxx

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    How do you arrange your class folders? I'm all digital and it's causing a bit of worry at school so I'd like to sort them out properly over this weekend.
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    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    How do you arrange your class folders? I'm all digital and it's causing a bit of worry at school so I'd like to sort them out properly over this weekend.
    My folders aren't organised. That's this weekend's job too. I am mostly digital.

    Wwhy are your school worried about that?

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    Ive had to spend so long on my folders and need to try and finish them this weekend. I have 2 weeks left of placement and my school need to sign off my evidence folder for the teaching standards. Plus my mentor has said she wants to see all of my mark sheets for my classes and my reflection sheets before she writes up my final report and mark so she can see Ive actually been doing what she asked me to. So much to do :/
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    My folders aren't organised. That's this weekend's job too. I am mostly digital.

    Wwhy are your school worried about that?

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    I think they're thinking a bit traditional. It's not a massive worry but I'm at the point where I don't want to do anything that might cause them to agree with my uni tutor and extend me.

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    (Original post by Ratchit99)
    Ive had to spend so long on my folders and need to try and finish them this weekend. I have 2 weeks left of placement and my school need to sign off my evidence folder for the teaching standards. Plus my mentor has said she wants to see all of my mark sheets for my classes and my reflection sheets before she writes up my final report and mark so she can see Ive actually been doing what she asked me to. So much to do :/
    Oh god I hope I don't have to show marksheets and reflections - I haven't done any!!

    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    I think they're thinking a bit traditional. It's not a massive worry but I'm at the point where I don't want to do anything that might cause them to agree with my uni tutor and extend me.

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    Yeah I guess there is no harm in sorting out some physical files.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Don't feel embarrassed or guilty at all!

    Every teacher has been there so they all know how you feel and won't think badly of you for crying.

    I have gone in and had to go home three times. Twice I convinced myself I was fine, struggled through teaching (god knows how I taught skipping to three year olds!) And then as soon as I could leave suddenly felt abysmal and threw up. The other I had been doing overtime (in a nursery) for a couple of months, so 50 hour weeks with the children, and it stopped me getting over a cold which just got worse. I got through the morning then lay down and cried at lunch, they sent me home and I cried again at the doctors lol.

    I also cried three times on my PGCE... In the toilets, at home (WHAT IF I'M JUST A TERRIBLE TEACHER?!?!) and once in a meeting with a mentor after an abysmal lesson. But only once in my NQT year, and that was because another staff member told a member of SLT I'd spoken nastily to them, which really upset me because I would never want to upset or speak nastily to anyone, I pride myself on being nice and really liked this staff member, plus it was right before an observation. The SLT member was lovely though, she shut the door and just listened and let me wait, offered to rearrange the observation and said she understood.

    So it happens!

    Hope you're recovering well.

    Xxx

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    Oh dear, the good old 'Oh god, what if I'm just crap and will never pass' PGCE cry. I know it well


    Had another big observation yesterday and my CfC was reviewed. I've got it for another week but I've gone from a 4 to a 3 in two weeks which is good. Obviously I'm worried about being a 3 at this stage but just taking it one step at a time. I'm just glad it's the weekend right now!
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    (Original post by Samus2)
    I am so utterly embarrassed

    Been feeling a bit ill the last few days with a sore throat and stuff. This morning I woke up about 5 with no voice and feeling horrendous, debated calling in sick but decided against it. On my walk in I felt awful and started getting the sweats and was going to ask my mentor if I could leave when I'd taught my lessons for the day.

    Got into the staffroom and got asked if I was okay and I just burst into tears, said I was feeling awful and my mentor and another teacher sat with me in the medical room for a bit. My mentor didn't even entertain the idea of me teaching today and he sent me home. Threw up at school so I know I needed to not be there...

    I feel so so embarrassed and eurgh, I just feel like such a wimp especially as a fair few teachers saw me cry.

    I also feel bad because it meant my mentor had to take my classes and I don't feel like I gave him enough warning
    I know how you feel! I seem to be constantly off ill (at least once a half term!!) and I feel like such a massive let down.
    The last time I was feeling so bad that I had to go home I had gone in determined that I would not let it get to me, I got into my classroom started preparing everything fro my first lesson and getting ready for form. 5 minutes before the form bell went I started wanting to cry in the classroom, I sucked it up (as there were kids in there) and decided to go for a little walk to the maths staff room/ I calmed down a little bit, pored myself a drink and then when the bell went I started crying. I tried to hide it from my colleagues but then my subject leader walked in, looked at me and I tried to turn away but she caught it, asked someone to go and take my form for me and made me sit down.
    I cried like a big baby and they told me to go home. I ended up sitting down, and falling asleep for the first period and then went home.

    I hate the fact that I have been caught crying quite a few times this academic year... and all because I was feeling poorly. I got caught crying last academic year (during my NQT) quite a few times based on how rubbish I felt at being a teacher. Things get better. HONESTLY!

    You are allowed to be upset and vulnerable at times!
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    For my interview on Weds I have to prepare an hour and a half lesson plan, but only deliver the first 25 mins. They want the lesson plan to show 1.5 hrs of the lesson, but do you think I am okay preparing my powerpoint for only the 25 mins I have to deliver?
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I just can't control them at all and they feed on it. My mentor has given me tips but nothing is working. Worse still, I was on track for a 1 but my mentor said I can't get a 1 if I can't control this class.

    My behaviour management is normally based on my strong relationship with the pupils, which is said to be one of my strengths. But I hate this class and they hate me, so I can't build up a relationship with a class so unlikable, meaning I've lost my key strength here.

    It sounds pathetic to cry over a class. I just feel they are holding me back and making me realise how crap I am.

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    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    I could have written this post, and I'm an NQT! Today I cried at lunch because of my y9's who I hate. They hate me. Like you, my strength during my PGCE and this year was creating a strong relationship with my classes. I don't have one inch of a relationship with this class and today was 1 hour of pure hell with them. No constructive advice but I do feel your pain! xx
    I could have written your posts. I've also always been complimented on my relationships with classes, and that's what I use to control them. But with a year 8 class I just haven't been able to develop that; I found out when I was particularly annoyed with them that their normal teacher lets them do what they want and doesn't really teach them (which would explain why this 'top set' is significantly underachieving). I think with some classes it's just a case of pupils knowing that you're a student teacher (and let's be honest, they almost all do) and so not really caring about their relationship with you - this really clicked for me yesterday when a girl got up in the middle of my lesson to ask the normal class teacher to go outside to have a drink after I'd just said no, and she responded "bu you're not my teacher" after having taken them for 2 months...


    (Original post by Airfairy)
    For my interview on Weds I have to prepare an hour and a half lesson plan, but only deliver the first 25 mins. They want the lesson plan to show 1.5 hrs of the lesson, but do you think I am okay preparing my powerpoint for only the 25 mins I have to deliver?
    I can't see why that would be an issue - planning for something you simply won't be teaching is just a waste of time.
 
 
 
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