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    Off to hand in my dissertation soon, and that's my degree complete

    This is the greatest feeling I have ever felt.
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    That is one the best feelings eveer! Lol such a weight of ones shoulder!

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    (Original post by Sobzi)
    Ive graduated in biomedical science and there aren't a lot of job in hospital for a trainee if any. I loved my course (I was at MMU) and no there was hardly any chemistry, it was genetics, histology, pathology, pharmacology, haematology and transfusion, immunology, microbiology and food and health (which was my favourite!)
    From my own experience I graduated from a well known uni, thinking it would open doors but it didnt. My course had a biochemistry unit at the beginning but it wasn't too hard.

    If you want to progress with a biomed degree pick a discipline (say histology) and gain as much experience as you can in that discipline. Show enthusiasm and a willingness to learn as this impresses those who have been working in the lab for a while.
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    I have just finished my AS level and I'm thinking about doing biomedical science. Can anyone tell me more about it? And what universities are the best? And what grades should I have in order to apply? My AS subjects are biology chemistry physics and maths. Are these subjects enough to apply? Can someone help please??
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    I know what you mean, I wanted to specialise in haematology or microbiology but its very very hard in this economic climate when for experience you only get a few weeks not paid or 3 month one off contracts (few and far!). I thought my job in a pharmacy would give my cv a boost but no such luck. And now I have been forced to look elsewhere as like anyone else I want a stable career rather than temp contracts. I think last year's, and the next couple of years graduates may not have much luck in getting a job in hospital because the laboratories and nhs is undergoing major changes and they're trying to train employees in the nhs already. I believe the names changing to healthcare scientists now?
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    (Original post by Sobzi)
    I know what you mean, I wanted to specialise in haematology or microbiology but its very very hard in this economic climate when for experience you only get a few weeks not paid or 3 month one off contracts (few and far!). I thought my job in a pharmacy would give my cv a boost but no such luck. And now I have been forced to look elsewhere as like anyone else I want a stable career rather than temp contracts. I think last year's, and the next couple of years graduates may not have much luck in getting a job in hospital because the laboratories and nhs is undergoing major changes and they're trying to train employees in the nhs already. I believe the names changing to healthcare scientists now?
    (Original post by francois)
    From my own experience I graduated from a well known uni, thinking it would open doors but it didnt. My course had a biochemistry unit at the beginning but it wasn't too hard.

    If you want to progress with a biomed degree pick a discipline (say histology) and gain as much experience as you can in that discipline. Show enthusiasm and a willingness to learn as this impresses those who have been working in the lab for a while.

    Did you guys take a year out for a sandwich placement? Does it help in getting a job?
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    hey 2468,


    I have seen students do their placement year successfully and I do believe its beneficial. Talking to these students, it appears that they either wanna continue working in a lab or quit the dream of becoming a BMS!

    You will get HCPC registration at the end of your degree if you a placement year and complete a portfolio.

    In regards to the other quote, I am currently a Specialist Healthcare Scientist - the title is not protected (in comparison to being a BMS) however this may change in the future.
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    Hi, can I ask are a recent graduate? And how have you felt getting into the job, did it take a while (1+yrs?)?????

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    Looool, i remember the day after I got my degree I applied for jobs - they said I had very little experience so I got rejected.

    I graduated in 2007 and got my first lab job in the NHS in 2011 (i worked in retail and clinics in between). I would say keep applying dont just go for NHS jobs, there are private ones too or look at working in a uni research lab etc.
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    (Original post by doctor92)
    and why is that?
    Once you get a job it is VERY difficult to get someone to help you do a portfolio.

    Plus its very repetitive
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    (Original post by francois)
    hey 2468,


    I have seen students do their placement year successfully and I do believe its beneficial. Talking to these students, it appears that they either wanna continue working in a lab or quit the dream of becoming a BMS!

    You will get HCPC registration at the end of your degree if you a placement year and complete a portfolio.

    In regards to the other quote, I am currently a Specialist Healthcare Scientist - the title is not protected (in comparison to being a BMS) however this may change in the future.

    Oh okay. That sounds good. I've applied to a few hospitals for a placement for September, just waiting for a reply yet. Fingers crossed!
    Also emailed ALOT of other labs across England but they all have been replying saying their committed to other Universities or that they are re-organising so cant take on trainees :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by 2468)
    Oh okay. That sounds good. I've applied to a few hospitals for a placement for September, just waiting for a reply yet. Fingers crossed!
    Also emailed ALOT of other labs across England but they all have been replying saying their committed to other Universities or that they are re-organising so cant take on trainees :rolleyes:
    Can I ask, do you have a preference to which discipline you work in?
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    (Original post by francois)
    Can I ask, do you have a preference to which discipline you work in?
    I am interested in Haematology. However, I'm keeping my options open...
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    (Original post by francois)
    Looool, i remember the day after I got my degree I applied for jobs - they said I had very little experience so I got rejected.

    I graduated in 2007 and got my first lab job in the NHS in 2011 (i worked in retail and clinics in between). I would say keep applying dont just go for NHS jobs, there are private ones too or look at working in a uni research lab etc.
    Our IBMS officer person thing () told us to look at vet jobs too.
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    Can't wait to start my degree!
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    Got my results today!

    First class honours! absolutely over the moon!
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    Congratulations!

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    I'm trying to find out which course I want to study at uni. I thought about biochemistry, biomedical science, molecular biology, something along those lines. But I don't know which ones right for me. So could someone like explain the main differences to me? Also in biochemistry, is it very chemistry based? And which unis would be good to study at and what degrees are seen as better than others. Plus, does it make a big difference which jobs i coud pursue depending on what of those sort of courses I study? I'm grateful for any sort of information on this topic
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    Hi there, Biochemistry is all about studying biology from a molecular, often atom level view and being able to interpret biology from a chemical point of view, basically if you like biology and chemistry you will love biochemistry. Most biochemistry courses have some chemistry involved but its usually more biology and less chemistry. Biomedical Science looks at biology from a medical, particularly human perspective so you will study physiology, disease processes etc. Molecular biology is somewhere between the two I would say, perhaps with an emphasis on the technique and applications that have lead to advances in biology particularity in the post genome revolution.
    Most Russell group universities (ie 20 top universities) offer these kinds of courses and if you graduate form one of these with a degree in any of these subjects you will be eligible for a wide range of jobs and careers from graduate entry medicine, PhD research, phama companies etc. Pick a course in a good university, work hard and get a good degree, take opportunities to expand your CV as they come along etc and you will be fine. The major thing to get right is choose a university where you are going to be happy as well as educated! Eg Warwick and York are very much campus (everything on one site) universities whereas Manchester, UCL, Imperial tend to be more spread out in city centers. Go on some open days and get a feel for the university.
    hope thats useful
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    can someone recommend me some good biomedical science books and what sections to read for first year? ty
 
 
 
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